3

Bakers yeast has been selected to ferment quickly, as the faster it ferments available sugars the faster the dough rises and the sooner you can bake your bread. Whereas, beer and cider yeasts have been selected for flavour profile, and not rate of fermentation. I have in the past brewed with Bakers yeast and if you keep the temps reasonable it can be OK, but ...


2

That sounds like it may have fermented out. What was your target FG?


2

Unadjusted readings from refractometers are accurate only with no alcohol present in the sample. So taking a reading on fermented beer will not give you an accurate specific gravity. Also, as an aside, mashing cooler would cause higher conversion rate (not lower). As long as you had it hot enough (but not too hot to cause the denaturing), then the ...


2

The key thing with mead is that you need to learn patience. It should not be done fermenting in a week or two. Not even a month or maybe not even two months. Leave it alone completely for at least a couple of months before even thinking about doing anything else to it. Time fixes a lot of things, especially with mead.


1

No, from brewing just with yeast, and even from a bit of freeze distilling, you won't get harmful chemicals in your beer. Also not from letting it stand before you added other yeast. It could get contaminated with other bacteria, yeasts or fungi, but at 7% alcohol at that point, I doubt if they would feel fine and ferment further. The test with the flame ...


1

This sounds like a simple case of mis-interpreting the refractometer. But the typical way to check for lowest possible final gravity (i.e.: remaining unfermentables) is to do a "Forced Fermentation Test". Essentially this is taking a small sample of the wort and giving it an abundance of yeast and warmth to see just how low the yeast will take the ...


1

Your mead likely won't read much more below 0.996, that is pretty well fermented. It may dry out a tiny bit over another few weeks, but depending on your alcohol content in the mead the readings can get a bit finicky that low so I wouldn't expect much movement. Still, 12 days is not very much and it's pretty early to even really start taking readings on it. ...


1

If your hydrometer is not reading correctly then yes this could be the issue. In tap water at 20 or 25 depending on calibration it should read 1000+/-0.5. If it is reading 1006 then it is a fair way off. Applying a correection factor of 1021 = 0006 => 1015 which is pretty close to your target of 1014. I I strongly suggest you get a new hydrometer. I would ...


1

How long has it been in primary fermentation? We need some extra context about what the recipe is, and what strain of yeast you used. Once those questions are answered, I can help guide you towards a guess, but truly without a hydrometer, it would be really hard to determine the state of fermentation. However, I can clear up some of what you wrote I didn’t ...


1

Obviously too late to help you, but I've used 3724 extensively and never had the stall after reading an article about saison yeasts by Drew Beechum. He said that 3724 doesn't perform well under pressure and recommended using a sanitized piece of aluminum foil placed loosely over the fermentation vessel. I use a Ss Brewtech bucket and just lay the foil over ...


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