6

Well you don't steep any grain "during the boil". But to avoid upsetting mash pH you can steep all your non mash required grains in the wort during runoff in the kettle before you start the boil. I routinely add my roasted and crystal malts to a grain bag and steep them this way when I make stouts. Another application of steeping malts is to actually make ...


5

You may get some oxidation of the "specialty" wort letting it sit like that. You aren't really saving any time though. Start your steep in cold water while you heat it up. By the time its at 160F you are generally good to pull the grains out and keep on heating to boiling. I know most instructions when I started extract and grain brewing says to steep in ...


5

Both will work, in the sense that you will get beer at the end, but they will have different results. The 160F steep for a few minutes will not extract much sugars from the base malt, and those that are extracted will be dextrins, non-fermentable sugars that give body, and also starches which will give the beer a haze. Combined with the use of extract ...


5

A question akin to "how long is a piece of string?" I hope knowledgeable readers will forgive me rehearsing the "received wisdom". Malting is the process of causing the barley seed to sprout and in the process release/produce enzymes (basically "amylase" and perhaps "protease") that inter alia can be used to convert contained starch to fermentable sugars. So ...


5

Absolutely! I rinse after use then throw them in with my laundry whites. Couple tips. These don't have to be sterile or even sanitized. A good rinse is really the only functional need they have. If washing with laundry. Use fragrance free detergent with an extra rinse cycle. I just use oxyclean. Makes them soft and bright again. Air / line dry them. Don'...


4

Yes, you use the wort you create by steeping as part of your boil volume. The method looks fine. I wouldn't worry about steeping efficiency. You won't get more than a few gravity points out of it unless you steep several pounds of grain. Also, be aware that not all grains are suitable for steeping. Some need an actual minimash.


4

(Yes, it's semantics: the words have different meanings. :) Mashing is the enzymatic conversion of starch to sugar, using alpha- and beta-amylaze naturally present in grain at the specific temperatures to activate them (~150°F). Steeping is using hot water to extract flavor and color compounds from grain.


3

The end result is the same, but mashing implies that enzymes are converting starches into sugars. These enzymes work when held around 150°F. The two enzymes are alpha and beta amylase. Alpha works more at higher temperatures (optimal at 158°F) and cuts starches randomly into long chain sugars (only some of which are fermentable). Beta works at lower ...


3

I've done it maybe 5-6 times and there's no problem. I keep the liquid from the steeping refrigerated overnight and boil it the next day. But as has been said, there may not be much time saving from it. If you think it would help you, there's no problem with it, though.


3

There's no upper limit in terms of how much speciality malt you can actually use and still extract sugar - the limit is more to do with taste. To my mind, in an extract brew, 20% is the maximum amount of caramel/crystal malt that I would use in a recipe, simply because of the amount of residual sweetness left, which is on top of the sweetness left by the ...


3

You're right that flaked barley normally has to be mashed to extract the potential yield. However, the main contribution of the flaked barley isn't so much the sugar potential, but beta glucans and proteins. The beta glucans contribute to the thicker mouthfeel, and the proteins to the foam (head). While you may get a little starch in the beer from steeping ...


3

I disagree with Denny's assessment. Compare the theoretical results of not crushing them to grinding them into a powder. The the first case you'll get little flavor/color; in the second you get maximum flavor/color. So the crush does indeed have an important impact. The key is to do it the same way every time for consistency brew to brew. That way an ...


2

With the 'tea' being added to your 60 minute boil, and as long as you follow good sanitation procedures, I don't see any major problems that you would run into. But, you can much more easily just steep your grains in your brew pot while bringing your water up to a boil. This won't add time to your brew day, and will save you time having to deal with ...


2

I don't think it would be a problem, just transfer it to your clean & sanitized fermenting bucket and put the lid and air lock on. the next day transfer back to the boiling pot. the only real down side I could see is it will take longer to bring to a boil.


2

So it looks like your source just took an all-grain recipe and converted by just taking the base grain and subbing in light DME, and then using ALL the flavor grains in a steep. Typically, one would choose some darker malt extract to compensate for some of the steeping grains, such as Jordan suggested. However, yes, this is one way to do what you want. 7....


2

You can go both ways on this. You can let it slowly drip out, or you can squeeze (definitely with gloves) as long as a few extra precautions are taken. I would recommend setting a sieve/fine-mesh strainer over your boil kettle to catch any protein matter that comes out of the bag when you squeeze, and be aware that if the pH of your water while doing the ...


2

Based on having done it myself, you will possibly have a burned, smoky flavor and not in a good way. Whether it's safe to drink depends at least partially on what the bag is made of. If the bag was muslin, it's likely safe. If it was nylon, I'd be more worried.


2

You typically do not need to mash Cara-helles or Caravienne. They are fully converted during the process used to make them the crystal malts that they are. They can be steeped in your wort post lautering and pre-boil.


2

For the sake of convenience I would replace them with nylon bags either from your LHBS or nylon paint strainer bags from your hardware store. The nylon bags clean very easily and have a very fine mesh so husk doesn't get stuck in them.


2

Either way will work and not make much difference. However, if you steep at 180 you'll denature the enzymes that convert the starches to sugar. The steep should be done between 145-160F for best results.


2

Basically any roasted malt have little to no enzymes from the heat in processing the malt and have already had thier sugars converted internally from enzymes. Mashing them does nothing special for them. So steeping crystal, carmel, roasted, carapils and carafoam can give the same results as adding them to the mash. Possibly even better results given the ...


2

As far as I understand, the hop utilization is affected by the specific gravity of the wort. E.g, the Daniels formula for calculating IBUs takes the boil gravity into account. My only source is this ppt :) Steeping grains does not substantially increase the gravity and should thus not affect hop utilization. According to Daniels, brewing with a boil ...


2

Depends on the water/grist ratio you want. Generally 0.33 gallons per lb is common, but much thicker and thinner ratios are used for different mash manipulations. So 5kg = 11lb, 3.8 gallons = 14.38 Liters


1

Depends on what you're trying to do. All grain varieties that do not need a mash step to help convert them can be steeped. I have steeped many a variety to make different beers. If I had two recipes that were very close in gravity and use the same base malt, I have made enough base malt wort to cover both brews, then split the wort and steeped the ...


1

I believe this would be a protein rest, though the temperature is considerably lower than what I have heard before. John Palmer, in his excellent book, says to use a temp between 113 and 131 degrees. Here is the link http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14-4.html. I have used this method quite a bit and seen a noticeable difference in the beer head ...


1

I've done the same thing with a hop sock. I'm pretty sure there nothing in them that could be harmful IMO. I was lucky and did if with an IPA so couldn't taste anything.


1

I use bags too. I have my rinse water ready to go and use the multi dip method of rinsing, like if you are dipping tea bags in a mug. Then, I use a stainless spatchula and a steamer tray from my rinse pot that sorta looks like a shallow collander (stainless), that came with my pot used for rinsing. I put the bag in the steamer and press with the spatchula to ...


1

There's no need to split each grain into its own bag, unless you want to remove them at different time intervals for whatever reason (hint: you don't. ;) If they'll all comfortably fit in one bag, great. If not split them up. Maximizing water contact is … probably negligible, here.


1

At that color, there isn't much if any, diastatic power to the malt. Steeping will be fine.


1

It's not clear which malt you mean - there no "Aroma" malt from Weyermann. It could be either CaraAroma or Aromatic malt. CaraAroma This you can steep with no concerns about the starches. CaraAroma is a crystal malt, which has had all the starches pre-converted to simpler sugars by the maltster. Steeping at 160°F is fine for this malt. Aromatic Malt ...


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