5

No don't boil it! Chances are you are fine at this point. Bacteria just don't hang around lonely old clothespins much. Without knowing what type yeast you pitched, I can't give a solid answer, but if you re-pitch using a strong yeast strain like EC1118, it will surely kill any new bacteria that may have been introduced. At a week old about 70-80% of the ...


5

I'm not quite an expert on beer making, but I have made honey ales a few times and was a beekeeper for about 8 years, so I have some honey knowledge. The crystallized honey is no different from normal honey. You can decrystallize it by suspending its container in warm water. This should make it a normal honey texture again, and it


4

Your options are: Leave it: You have already put the effort in to make the brew so I would say just leave it until it is ready to bottle. Buy a second fermenter: then transfer the remaining beer to it after it has been cleaned and sterilized. Fix the leak: Depending on the size of the leak you could try to stem the flow with either vasonline, tape it up, ...


3

If you picked up vinyl smell from fresh tubing it won't leave the mead. It may fade in time, but along with some of the other good smells in the mead too, because it will take a long time. And in a closed container that aroma isn't going anywhere.


2

Even if it was contaminated, as long as you plan on boiling it, it will be safe. If it was very spoiled (smelled bad), then it might have fewer sugars and the end result may taste bad. Otherwise, you should be fine.


2

The most usual suspect is oxidation, which manifests in cardboard-like flavour or cooking sherry flavour. Lack of hop flavour/aroma in a beer which is supposed to be hoppy can also be caused by age. A lambic-style homebrew may get vinegary with age, if packaged and stored improperly.


2

I don't think I would boil the wine, I am afraid it would affect the taste negatively. Any solids (like dust) will either fall to the bottom or float on the surface. In either case, you should be able to get rid of it after racking your wine. Any bacteria introduced could spoil the wine, but chances are small in my opinion. In any case, infection will ...


2

I'd consider throwing them out entirely. Grain will stale over time. Typically it should be used within a year or two, otherwise it will take on strange flavors from staling. If you're curious, you can munch on a few kernels to see what it tastes like. If you don't mind the taste, you could still brew with it. But my bet is it will taste "off"....


1

I just brewed a Chinook IPA kit (LME) from Northern Brewer that's been on my shelf for over 6 months. Granted, it's not an AG batch but the consensus is that "old ingredients" do not produce optimum results and I can attest to that since this batch did not turn out well. It tastes like a mix between a pale ale and a stout. SRM is way darker than ...


1

All beer changes with age. Delicate intangibles of hops and malts are first to fade away. Many styles are best fresh. Kolsch, Pils and anything hop forward. What happens in aging is these flavors and aromas fade and meld into the whole of the beer. Not always a bad thing. As far as worse case for homebrew. It would be infections or brewing defects that ...


1

It's not only homebrew! I needed some swing top bottles, and obtained a crate of empty bottles from the liquor store. But part of them was not empty. Those were Floreffe Tripel bottles, still sealed, but the expiration date was March 2018. Not too far out one would say, but what I smelled and tasted reminded me more of port wine. But a little bit too funky ...


1

The original Mr Beer has holes in the top half that let air out, there was no airlock. So you could have filled it higher than designed and with a vigorous fermentation some yeast leaked out. You can tape paper towels to the outside to see where the leak is, but if it's on top then it may be by design. if not, as suggested use "food grade" silicone. The ...


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