7

Traditionally sweet stouts are sweetened by malts and underattenuation in fermentation. In recent times stouts are sweetened by unfermentable sugars like lactose. IE Milk Stout. I'm not aware of any dark malts that wouldn't provide their characters, in flavor. Though aging does make them more rounded and mild. ... After some conversation on http://hb.chat/ ...


6

So far I found no difference in head retention from various relatively highly kilned specialty malts like crystal/caramunich etc. Carafoam is a different beast in that regard. Btw likely same level of head retention, as from carafoam, can be achieved with additions of flaked barley or torrified wheat. Not mentioning that healthy yeast and good fermentation ...


5

Like Evil says, you have about three ways to make it sweeter: Add non-fermentable sugars. (In addition to the normal stuff, of course) Lactose is pretty usual for this one. I've made sweet stout extract recipes this way. Make sure your grain extract has lots of non-fermentables. This might mean mashing at a higher temp, if you are doing all-grain. You ...


4

English chocolate malt provides color with more smoothness and less roast character than typical US chocolate malt. Brewery.org says this on it's malt 101 page Chocolate Malt - ( Brown malt) 400 L British Chocolate malt is ideal for British Porters and Brown or Mild Ales and even Stouts. It's a little darker than domestic Chocolate malt yet it ...


4

They are 2 different things. Specialty grains will have a direct impact on the flavor of the beer, with a secondary impact on body and mouthfeel. Mash time, temp, and process will have a primary impact on body and mouthfeel and secondarily on flavor. But specialty grains and mash manipulation can have large effects on the beer that will overlap to some ...


4

According the Brau Kaiser, it's acidic melanoidins. Melanoidins are composed of sugars and amino acids, and are created through the Maillard reaction.


4

Using specialty malts for head retention is kind of a canard. You'll have much better luck by controlling your fermentation....http://byo.com/stories/article/indices/35-head-retention/697-getting-good-beer-foam-techniques . To answer your question more directly, neither one is better than the other.


4

Crystal Malt is a subset of Caramel Malt. Thus all Crystal Malts are Caramel Malts, but not all Caramel Malts are Crystal Malts. Confusing the issue of nomenclature is the fact that Crystal Malt is sometimes referred to as Caramel Malt, especially by American maltsters. It is not possible to tell whether a "caramel malt" is Crystal Malt or a non-crystal ...


3

I don't really view the C120 or the Special B as being roasted malts that would contribute significant bitterness issues. So one pound of Roasted Barley seems spot on and not an issue as far as bitterness is concerned. I have added more than 2lbs of RB, BP and chocolate in combination and not worried about bitterness. I would be concerned about using the ...


2

A mash is certainly more flexible and gives the brewer the most freedom, while extracts+steeping grain is far more convenient and requires much less equipment. In the mash, you can achieve a more malty beer simply by using more malt, or using a variety that has a strong maltiness to it. (I'm thinking Maris Otter, but also Munich malt) It would be hard to ...


2

That's husk fragments Winnowing doesn't get 100% removal. Looks like the grain from the bottom of the bag to me.


1

When using grains for a kit, you should steep them. That is the simplest. According to this question it is normally better to mash honey malt, but you can steep it too. For steeping put your grains in a bag and add 1,5 l water of 65°C to it. Let it rest for half an hour, then replace part of the water needed for the kit with the amount of extract obtained ...


1

Your bitter from grains will be mainly from the black barley but wouldn't be noticeable imo because of the residual sweetness from the 120 and SB. It is a lot of dark grains. Keep in mind the PH plunge in the mash from the roasted grains.


1

As has been stated already, you are talking about two completely different things from "How to Brew chapter 13.1" there are basically two kinds of malts: those that need to be mashed and those that don't. ... Specialty malts like caramel and roasted malts do not need to be mashed. These malts have undergone a special kilning process in which the starches ...


1

Great details stored here: https://byo.com/mead/item/456-chocolate-malt "There are a few different versions of chocolate malt on the market, ranging anywhere from the pale stuff (at around 200 °L) to the dark English (~500 °L). Using a broad brush, the English versions are usually the darkest and the American versions the lightest. Whichever you choose, be ...


1

Really hard to tell the difference just based on Lovibond.. You can have 2 different 350L US chocolate malt that taste very different to each other. Reason being 350L only tells you the finished darkness of the malt, but it does not tell you how its kilned ie, short time in high heat, or long time in a staggered temperature schedule. It all makes a big ...


1

Wrt the claims that the terms are used interchangably: this appears to be true in the USA, for historical reasons, but it ain't so everywhere. And the mere fact that a term is used (by some people), interchangably, does not mean they are strictly correct. As the initial answer indicates (and it is accurate), they are, in fact, different, with one being an ...


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