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6

I think what you made is safe, but there's no way to not produce alcohol with that method.


2

It's no problem carbonating half a keg, other than you use twice as much gas (you still have to fill the whole keg of gas at the same pressure.) For me, a refill for my 20lb CO2 tank costs about $120 so it's quite expensive. So, to get the most from the CO2 I'd just make up a full keg of syrup and carbonate that. Give your customer the half keg he wants and ...


2

Any fermentable sugar can be used to ferment. Sucrose, glucose, maltose, honey, corn syrup and cane sugar are all good examples. Molasses treacle and candi sugar are other more flavoured examples. Ultimately most ripe sweet fruits will ferment themselves - like grapes. If you are trying to carbonate your drink then adding up to 10g of sugar to a 1 Litre ...


2

20 feet of 3/16" (vinyl) beer line is 60psi of resistance. Even at 35 psi, I'm surprised you got any flow. 5 feet of 3/16" beer line is 15psi of resistance. 35 psi is an extremely high carbonation level (for beer, not necessarily for soda), even near-freezing. I'd suggest using the 5ft beer line at 16-20 psi. That should get you 3-4 volumes of CO₂, ...


1

I would re-bottle with carbonated water. One trick you can use is based on the fact that the amount of CO2 (or any gas) which can be dissolved in a liquid increases as it is chilled. If you chill soda water to near zero, it will be visibly far less fizzy. You can pour it between vessels and lose little gas. In practice, simply storing it in a fridge should ...


1

Soda is simply water, sugar, yeast, and flavouring (artificial or natural). The above directions are helpful. I have made a couple of batches of hard ginger ale, and will be experimenting with various flavourings with my current batches. I will be trying strawberry kiwi, raspberry, and mint. There are multiple recipes for the hard ginger ale online. The ...


1

Agree with Evil Zymurgist 100% but wanted to emphasize something. I've never heard that lower fermentation temps will encourage ester production. Also, definitely use a hydrometer for any level of precision. Forty hours is enough time to ferment a significant percentage of your sugars. I'd be willing to bet you've probably been getting a higher alcohol ...


1

13 brix / 1.050 SG and 21°C/69°F in a 10liter / 2.6g batch your yeast is going to go nuts leaving almost no residual sugars and make the complex alcohols making the nail polish (solvent-like) off flavor, and a 4-5%ABV "soda" if allowed to complete. Generally a ginger beer uses a "ginger bug" that ferments just enough to carbonate. Or is stopped by ...


1

Check the flow on the keg with water, you may have a blockage that's preventing clear flow through the faucet.


1

The thing about champagne yeast (and other wine yeasts) is that they have been selected to eat a lot a of fermentable sugar with little nutrients around. Another facet of this is, even though the yeast is recommended for a particular temperature doesn't mean it won't ferment outside that range, or wake up later to finish the job. As long as there is live ...


1

Provided you aren't making a fermented soda, making soda is like bottling day for beer. You are essentially preparing the ingredients and carbonating. If you do this with priming sugar and yeast, you do actually create a small amount of alcohol (~0.25%). However, you do have some of the the same sanitation concerns and precautions. If you bottle your soda ...


1

I have had some accidents with my new brewing software and I ended up with 10 liters of beer instead of 18. I kegged and carbonated and it worked fine. I have never tried kegging cola, but I am sure that the process is the same. As long as the regulator is set to a specific level you should be good.


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