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8

I would think not. SMaSH means single malt and a single hops. The point is simplicity and purity, where emphasize the flavor of a single malt and single hops. Adding additional ingredients will change the attributes of the beer, which will means that it is no longer a single malt. But IMO, the more important question is why do you care? Beer is a beverage ...


4

I used Omega Lutra Kveik on a Bells THA clone last month and it turned out great. There is usually this slippery mouthfeel with the US-05 which wasn't there with the Lutra. I couldn't believe how clean the beer was when transferring. Be prepared for a blow off tube though. Fermentation was done at room temp which varied 72F to 75F. (update) I had a couple ...


4

Last Australian summer I did a few brews with Lallemand brand Kveik dry yeast at ambient temperatures around 26degC (79degF); actual fermentation got to between 28-29degC (82-84degF) according to my laser thermometer. The results were excellent. Clean tasting beer and no off flavours whatsoever. Kveik is described as a neutral yeast, and my results support ...


4

We did a "Farmhouse IPA" a year or so ago with Omega's Voss Kveik yeast and fermented it at 90°F. I was pleasantly surprised with how clean it was. It had the expected citrus-y notes, and paired nicely with 3+ lbs. per barrel of dry-hopping, too (Simcoe, Citra, Galaxy). "IPAish enough" is clearly a subjective term. If you're looking for ...


4

The key piece that's missing here is extraction efficiency - how much sugar you can get out of the grains. In the calculator, it's set at 80%, but it's doubtful you got that just from steeping and lautering in a pot. You typically need continual recirculation to get 80%+. With my old equipment (a large cooler with a hand-made series of pipes with slits.) I ...


2

Different specialty malts affect your beer differently: color malts: color, body roasted malts: toasty, chocolate, roasted, or coffee flavor cara-... malts: caramel flavor, mouthfeel, head retention acid malt: ph level adjustment (not a malt, but for completeness) flaked oaks: for head retention and creamy full body smoke malt: special smoke flavor (only ...


2

I assume when you describe "specialty malts" you are talking about the whole grain components of a partial mash recipe. Strictly speaking specialty malts are any grains besides the base malt. To someone who uses extract for their base specialty is probably anything that isn't extract, but to a whole grain brewer specialty malts have a more specific meaning. ...


2

The analogy used with stones in water is a poor one, the reason being that stones are large and follow stokes law for particle size. They most certainly sink immediately, however, if you crushed up almost any rock or clay to the size of a yeast cell they would be suspended in the liquid and would contribute buoyancy to the hydrometer. The density change ...


2

Yes, as you said "A SMASH beer is Single Malt And Single Hop". And wheat malt is still a malt. So yes, you can call it a SMASH beer.


2

According to Drew Beecham's article in November/December 2012 Zymurgy and associated presentation (subscription required), the term SMaSH was coined on homebrewtalk.com and, of course means, Single Malt and Single Hop. Your question highlights part of the problem with SMaSH recipes...they can be boring or lacking a quality you desire. So although adding an ...


1

I have done a couple of brews with Voss Kevik and I think it would work well. I have used it in the past, not in IPAs, but I see no reason why it should not work for you. Got a big batch of brewing next week with a combo of S04, Brett C and Kevik, touch of hops and a big bag of non-hop botanicals. I really like Kevik as a yeast and should probably use it ...


1

Pellet hops are considered 15% more efficient at utilization than dry hops (according to Charles Faram) meaning for 100g of pellets you would need 115g of dry hops for the same recipe. Using the information in this answer you can then convert the weight of dry hops to wet hops. The answer there says: "Fresh hops weigh 4-6 times more than their dry ...


1

Generally a SMASH is a simple recipe to experiment with a single ingredient at a time To be true to the acronym one would only be able to play with base malts and bittering hops. But this isn't the case. IMO it was never intended to be strict to the acronyms meaning. Single malt, single hop. But rather single malt, single hop aside from a well known base ...


1

I believe that mdma's answer to this very similar question is the more correct one, and in conflict with the accepted answer here. Helpfully, there is a citation to support the conjecture that sediment can influence hydrometer readings. It seems that best practice is to let the sediment settle out. The relevant info as unearthed by mdma from this source: ...


1

To answer this question, let's examine a few things that we know. For the most part, DME or LME (particularly, the light or pale) is made mostly from 2-row barley malt, which is notoriously flavorless (I know that you can buy Maris Otter Malt Extract). Secondly, compared to DME and LME, the steeping grains that are used in extract brewing are very cheap. ...


1

Besides the potential causes that @mdma cites (possibly mash is too thick, leading to poor contact of water with grain and poor sparging), which can be solved by having a more liquid mash (at least 0.55L of strike water per kg of grain, or 1.3 qts. per lb.), a primary cause is the fact that your efficiency tends to decline as your grain volume (OG) increases....


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