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7

Grats on your first brew! Ultimately you need to draw beer from above the trub (sediment). If your fermentor is designed for fermenting and has a spigot, it should have an adjustable arm you can turn to draw beer from above the trub. If it's a bottling bucket you can prop up the bucket a couple inches while it's settling to get trub to settle away from ...


5

Sorry to say that looks like the beginning of a pellicle, meaning your beer is infected. But if you drink it quickly, you may avoid the worst of it. Best case, it might even taste good! And NEVER put that heater in your beer! Put the beer in a tub of water and put the heater in the water.


4

Brettanomyces comes in many forms, leading to many different flavour profiles. The main three you will come across commercially are: B.Claussenii - Fruity with mild funk B.Bruxellensis - Tasty Horse Blanket (this is Orval) B.Lambicus - heavy funk with sour fruits Depending on when you add the Brett to the fermentation will determine how soured your beer ...


3

Brett beers can be very interesting, and aren't necessarily sour unless the source also was sour. Brett usually gives more of a leather or "barnyard" character which can evolve with longer aging. Brett works very slowly so the 40-day guideline isn't far from the truth but you might need to wait even longer, many months possibly, to get much out of it. If ...


3

There are yeasts which can ferment lactose, but these are not beer yeasts. Since saison yeasts are normally single-strain beer yeasts, they lack the property to ferment lactose. Bacteria and other wild yeasts (including brettanomyces) are able to ferment and/or metabolize lactose.


3

The Dupont strain is a kinda special beast. We found in an experiment on Experimental Brewing that you need to open ferment it to prevent the stall. Whether it's pressure or CO2 toxicity hasn't been determined. Assuming you're using an airlock, remove it and use a piece if foil loosely over your fermenter. That should fix it. https://www....


3

It's possible that the aromatics went volatile in the boil and was then gasses off in fermentation. Leaving only oils that manifest aroma at warm temps. Try the zest as a secondary addition, or a flame out addition or both. Also there could be other flavors and aromas over powering the zest.


3

It's hard to say what is making the pellicle. But as for your white dots, they are too uniform for an organic IMO. I would say they are just co2 bubbles trapped under the pellicle.


3

Yes, a beer can still get bacterial/fungal contamination when its SG is below 1, though it will be a much less hospitable environment than higher SG beers since the available nutrients will be less. A finished beer with a specific gravity of 0.996 actually does have residual unfermented/unfermentable extract, which some microbes can make use of to grow. I ...


3

Nope. Keep your priming sugars the same. Explanation: The sugars we usually use for carbonation is 100% (or near 100%) fermentable. Thus, it will cause the same amount of carbonation.


3

Nope, you don't need to change a thing.


2

I used WY 3724 in my last saison. My records show 60 days to go from 1.053 to 1.005, but I kept the temperature at 88 F. for most of that. For the first few days, the yeast is very active. However, the krausen falls, and the yeast slows down once 50% apparent attenuation is reached. If you raise the temperature and are patient, the yeast will keep going and ...


2

I doubt you'll have an issue. Fermwraps don't get hot enough to auto-ignite anything (It can't even bring water to a boil without melting the plastic), so I doubt anything will catch fire due to the heat of the FermWrap. If there's an electrical fault somewhere, well that's beyond the scope of this question and forum. I'm going to guess in most cases, ...


2

if people are still wondering about these results.. both of these strains were found to be S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus and contain the gene that allows them to chop up dextrins and do this very slowly. Basically you end up with lower FG's than you would expect based on the target and recipe procedure. I was myself wondering if people have bottle ...


2

In my experience yeast gives up early when I see it drop out of high krausen / exponential growth / feeding phases in 1-2 days. It's the first sign for me to be diligent in taking readings and making adjustments to keep it going well. There's many reasons why this effects final gravity. Over all its speculated that when the yeast works too fast in growth ...


2

Regarding your question about yeast viability - it probably depends a little bit on how long you had the beer stored in the fridge, and how cold you stored it. Assuming you only had it stored for a few days, it's likely you will still have viable yeast left. I also believe that you have not done any harm by warming your beer. The full keg of beer has quite ...


2

Saison yeasts do not metabolise lactose, therefore it can be used to sweeten your Saisons if you wish to do so. Lactose is not fermentable by Saccharomyces brewers yeasts, there are some yeast strains that can work their magic on lactose or galactose. Some strains of Brett can ferment out lactose others cannot. Here is a table from Gilliland 1961:


1

The Saison strains are very sensitive to CO2 toxicity. Most of the CO2 produced during fermentation escapes out the airlock but some of it does dissolve into the beer. (A taste test of a small sample of any fermented beer will be slightly carbonated as a result of this). Swirling the fermentor occasionally during the fermentation process agitates the ...


1

I cannot think of any strain of brewer's yeast that will take on lactose, but as mentioned different fermentations like sours and lambics can work with lactose and its derivatives. The fact that yeast can barely digest lactose is how people get milky flavors for things like cream stouts. The milk sugar just hangs around for flavor.


1

The existing answers are hard to add to. However, making sure you end up with minimal sediment in your fermenter in the first place goes a long way in clarifying the beer. Such as using hop bags or a boil screen to keep pellet hop gunk out. Also the use of clarifying agents such as whirfloc in the boil and using a whirpool will all contribute to the wort ...


1

I've had big problems with too much trub (sediment) in my first couple of batches but now that I use an auto-syphon it isn't really an issue anymore. Hop pellets definitely will contribute to the sediment residing at the bottom of a batch but an auto-siphon is extremely helpful as you can use it to avoid sucking directly off of the bottom of the carbon, thus ...


1

You can also add gelatin to the batch before bottling. Our will cause they sediment to coagulate and settle. Then bottle using cane and a racking tip to ensure less debris. I had the same issue as well.


1

I just finished a saison using 3724. Gravity went from 1.055 to 1.009. I used the amount of priming sugar for 3.2 volumes, and after 1.5 weeks in bottles they are VERY carbonated. I was thinking I might dial mine back next time. However, I don't think you are in danger of making bottle bombs just from the bottling sugar, so I would say just try them out in ...


1

Make a starter ASAP. That is the only way to know if anything survived. Chances are slim as the frozen cells rapture when frozen. If the starter picks up, then step it up and harvest from that. If you want to freeze your yeast you need special "anti-freeze" so that the cells do not rapture.


1

The viability will have been seriously affected you may have some OK cells in there, but the formation of ice crystals with in the cells will have ruptured the majority of the cells. You may be able to make a starter from it.


1

My co author, Drew Beechum, is pretty much recognized as the master of saison. In our book "Experimental Homebrewing" he writes about 565 and how temprementl it can be. For one thing, you need to raise the temp into the 80s after the first couple weeks in order to get the yeast to finish. That will clean up a lot of the diacxetyl. Most surprisingly, it's ...


1

As long as your yeast is healthy and abundant and you're not cold-crashing the beer as soon as fermentation tails off, you'll be fine. I've fermented with a number of Saison and Belgian strains (though I can't remember which off the top of my head) and I've never had any problems with diacetyl. Also, basically any strain that's known to produce diacetyl in ...


1

If you're scaling everything else linearly, you want to do the same with the orange peel, too.


1

What yeast are you using? I've had 2-3 month primaries with saisons in the past, nothing to worry about. From http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=60 This strain is notorious for a rapid and vigorous start to fermentation, only to stick around 1.035 S.G. Fermentation will finish, given time and warm temperatures.


1

In my dealings with Saison yeast they take a bloody long time to finish primary fermentation, 105 days doesn't sound untoward to me. You'll find that it'll be slowly bubbling for the whole time. It's definitely a patience yeast, and you'll probably want to make enough so you can check the gravity every 3-4 weeks to ensure it's still going (and to give you ...


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