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3

OG should be 1.073, 75 IBU, FG somewhere around 1.013. Maybe NB uses a different efficiency to calculate things. I gave them my numbers.


3

Let's start with your hops replacements. Traditionally (before hops became common) all sorts of other herbs were used. These all had something in common: an intense bitter flavor. You need the bitterness to offset the otherwise cloying sweetness of the beer. While green tea, orange peel or coriander may work to flavor a beer (not sure I'd enjoy a coriander-...


3

Using today's highly modified malts, mash temp makes a lot less difference than it used it. I'd say it's the rye. I have made many, many rye beers and as the % of rye rises, the beer gets a thicker, more intense mouthfeeel.


3

Generally the temperature of the mash can give a thicker consistency to the beer as you move from 63-68 degC for you mash temperature the high you go the more dominant alpha-amylase will be. This cleaves off unfermentable tri-saccharides (three unit sugars) which give a full mouth feel, where as beta amylase which is most active ~63-64 degC cleaves single ...


3

Probably not. Typically people rack to secondary once most signs of active fermentation are done in the primary fermenter. 1.022 seems too high for primary to be completely done, but it's impossible to say without knowing what the gravity was the day before and after that, how many days it's been fermenting, what the activity level is in the fermenter, etc....


2

Quick Version I don't know about the flavour. As long as you are using it with a base malt you can use up to ~50%, you don't need to get malted triticale or pre-cook it(see below). Also, I have no idea where you could find some in the UK; if you can find some flaked then try that. PS: if you know where to find some please post a link here, because I am ...


2

Rye malt is generally similar to wheat with a projected distilled water mash ph of 6.04 for a %100 wheat grist. Select "Wheat" in your water profile calculator, and mash ph estimator.


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I would actually encourage you to HOLD UP on changing the yeast. First of all, you didn't indicate what yeast you actually used. I'm assuming its a neutral ale yeast (US-05, Nottingham, Muntons, etc) because you really don't want a ton of yeast flavor in a Rye Pale Ale. That style highlights the weird spicy flavor of the rye along with a nice hop wallop, and ...


2

Link Ferluic Acid Rest This rest is one that people who make wheat beers sometimes use. It is short but its at 111-115 degrees. It develops ferulic acid. Doing this rest aids to the clove like flavors that are in wheat beers.. Yeast: The Practical Guide to Beer Fermentation "Performing a Ferulic asic rest around 110F(43C) can increase the level of ...


1

I would get some honey, maybe some fruit, bakers' yeast and make a mead. Factory produced bread yeast generally has an alcohol tolerance of around 14% AbV. https://www.growforagecookferment.com/mead-recipes/ You can probably also buy malt extract (cooking grade) in the baking section.


1

It's my understanding that ferulic acid is released in the mash and produced by yeast in fermentation. Typically unmalted rye is used in sahti this may have similar properties as malted wheat concerning ferulic acid giving you the clove ester. But clove can be obtained easier by yeast esters. The sahti style has no boil and a starting ABV of 7%. While ...


1

No hate here would love to know how this turns out. Here is a list of Edible flowers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_edible_flowers You could also try a Belgium yeast strain to get a nice spread of esters, that will complement your raspberries.


1

I like the fruity and florals from London Ale yeast. Sounds fun. Let us know how it turns out. Curious though. Why not just use rye grain and then add the smoke infused berry solution in secondary? Or smoke the grains with the flower.


1

At least here in the US, the dominant yeast suppliers are Wyeast and White Labs. Since you're talking about the differences of switching between strains of yeast I'd say it'll be most beneficial to consult the lab whose yeast you're getting. They'll give you tons of strain-specific info about flavor production, optimum temperatures, pitch rates, all that ...


1

I have brewed dozens and dozens of rye beers...maybe more than most people, and I have never encountered that. I'd say that either you're extremely sensitive to something about rye or you're misinterpreting the cause.


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