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8

You can't fix Sh!t beer. Invest your time and money on re-brewing it the way you wanted to brew it. Pouring the beer into a fermentor will only oxidize it and make it worse, regardless of what you want to add to it. If you are really hell bent on keeping it, go to your favorite bottle shop and buy the strongest double IPA you can get. And blend to taste ...


6

IMHO, play this batch to its strengths, e.g. cooking ribs or perhaps serving on nitrogen, or mix at pouring time with another beer. You could try salvaging the batch by blending, but if it still doesn't turn out as you like, then you will have wasted two batches. Since it's already bottled, that would deter me away from trying to rescue it, and instead I ...


5

There's no reason to dump a beer that isn't contaminated. After 1.5 weeks and a trip to 80F, the beer should be done fermenting. And warm temps late in fermentation have little impact on flavor. You can try stirring up the yeast, but a re-pitch of active yeast is probably worth doing. If you can make a starter that would really help, since the partly ...


3

The Dupont strain is a kinda special beast. We found in an experiment on Experimental Brewing that you need to open ferment it to prevent the stall. Whether it's pressure or CO2 toxicity hasn't been determined. Assuming you're using an airlock, remove it and use a piece if foil loosely over your fermenter. That should fix it. https://www....


3

You're simply being impatient. It's not at all uncommon for it to take that long for yeast to start. Be patient for another 24 hours and you should see fermentation. Although you say you made a starter, your timeline is so short that your starter wouldn't have had time to do much.


2

While it may just be taking its time to start up, I would say you should pitch another batch (or two, depending) of yeast. The amount will depend on whether or not you used a starter for your yeast. I'm guessing you did not, and if you are brewing a 1.060 gravity 5 gallon ESB, Mr. Malty's yeast pitching calculator tells me you needed 2.1 batches without a ...


2

WY1084 can be a slow starter. On at least 3 occasions has 1084 left me with no visible signs of fermentation for 72 hours, and then it springs into life. Give it 72 hours and then decide what to do. I'd be very surprised if the yeast really are dead. More than likely you'll see signs of fermentation. You can use either campden tablets (1 per gallon is ...


2

I vote for #1. First of all, the reason to smack a pack is to assess the viability, not to grow more yeast. Maybe you were already aware of that. Did it swell at all? Your OG was higher than I like to direct pitch, but not so high as to give you real problems. Your wort should still be OK given good cleaning and sanitiation procedures, but you could ...


2

I have never tried this personally, however I remember an episode of "Basic Brewing Radio" titled "Hopped Vodka" or something like that. This guy used Vodka (and a specific procedure) to basically make a hop extract. The hops were soaked in the Vodka and a couple different distillation procedures were used (freezing and removing water, and something else) ...


2

You're going to have to take a gravity reading in order to determine whether or not fermentation has completed. It clearly did ferment given your description of events, but now it becomes a question of how much, and whether or not it has completed. I suspect you may have under-pitched despite using a yeast starter, which would cause an extended ...


2

Certainly doesn't sound like it. Oxidation can take a number of forms other than "wet cardboard". It can manifest as metallic flavors or weirdly caramel notes. It sounds more like an infection than oxidation to me.


2

No matter what the gravity reads, that beer is done. What was the OG? Was it an extract batch? I doubt repitching will make any difference.


2

In my experience yeast gives up early when I see it drop out of high krausen / exponential growth / feeding phases in 1-2 days. It's the first sign for me to be diligent in taking readings and making adjustments to keep it going well. There's many reasons why this effects final gravity. Over all its speculated that when the yeast works too fast in growth ...


2

I strongly advise against yeast nutrients, unless you are sure that this addition will not be sensed in finished beer even if yeast will fall to eat it. Once I had a batch less than optimal due to this. First, you can just stir gently. This may sometimes be all you really need. Second, more reliable way is to add a packet or three (yes, three, really) of ...


2

One can pitch dry powdered yeast directly into a brew. It often works well but sometimes not. In my entire brewing career(?!?) I have never used a yeast nutrient(!?!). Some do, some don't. I usually recommend making a starter with yeast in sugar solution as this is the easiest way to check the yeast is actually active before pitching. I have used powdered ...


2

From my perspective, you're taking this temperature thing way too seriously. I mean, it is important to respect temperatures when brewing, (especially for mashing) but in the fermentation process, you should not see any significant differences within the range of 2-3°C. your yeast performs best in the range 18-23 degrees, a 0.9°C difference should not ...


1

An update to my original question in case anyone stumbles across this in the future. Around 24-36 hours after asking this question the primary fermentation began - indicated by a krausen which formed at the top. This is the slowest start to a fermentation I have had and I can only assume is down to conditions described in the OP damaging the yeast somewhat. ...


1

If the water in the sauce pan was hotter than 80°F. I'm thinking it was since it only took a few seconds for a few° rise. What mostlikley happened is most of the yeast in closest contact to the pan water was instantly killed. The other yeast also would have experienced a rapid expansion damaging the cell walls. Repitch it. This time just put your yeast ...


1

Well, first of all, the grain bill is not one of red flanders. There's no place for chocolate malt, nor for flaked corn. 8 kg base malt is gonna give you too high OG for the style (assuming you're doing 5gal/20l batch). Too much hops, too (again, assuming 20l batch, but too much even for 40l). The share of special malt of caramel-ish type should be much ...


1

It looks like you aren't the only one having this problem, however it may just be that it's finished: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=161961 http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=376552 If you wanted to be sure, you can just pitch the yeast in directly... from what I have read, starters aren't needed for pitching dried packet yeast.


1

Without doing a cell count using dye, microscope and hemocytometer. You really won't know the viable cell count. Otherwise it's all just guessing based on apperances and volumes. I would just pitch a single jar in 5gal and get on with life.


1

I would start by just swirling the carboy so that the yeast bed breaks up. Leave it for a few days and take another reading. It there is no or little change, then do as Pepi says; make a starter and re-pitch to the same fermenter.


1

001 is a pretty attenuative yeast. You're simply impatient. In a beer of that OG, I wouldn't even begin to worry until it had been over 3 weeks. Leave it alone for another week or so and see where it is then.


1

Yeast activity will lag longer than a day if the cell count is low. For a 5gal batch, one pouch is generally considered a medium-to-low cell count. Some people just buy 2 pouches, other people make their own starter... You are shooting for the pitch yeast to reproduce about 3 generations before reaching the population levels where fermentation really gets ...


1

The bag should puff up a little, but as it says on the back, it does not have to puff up all the way to be working. As Denny said, patience grasshopper. If you want super fast starts then re-pitch some of the yeast cake from the primary of the last batch. That takes off like a rocket. And if you're buying the nice, but expensive, wyeasts, then it makes ...


1

I'm in line with brewchez and mdma when they say not to rescue the beer especially since it has already been bottled. Everything tends to get better with time, so cellar the beer, forget about it and revisit it around November or December and see if it's gotten any better. If not, I'll give you my address (I'm one state over) and you can ship it to me. NEVER ...


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