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I have made many batches of pineapple and blackberry wine, and although every book says I should use campden tablets, I have friends who are intolerance to sulphides. As such I either pitch a vigorous starter, or heat the must to ~70C for 2 min to pasteurise it, then let it cool before pitching the yeast. To avoid pectin haze if you go the heating route, ...


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I've successfully made wine in corny kegs and had the wine keep for many years. I use Nitrogen to pressurize the keg, which doesn't dissolve into the beer and provides an inert atmosphere.


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The author of the article is reliable, Daniel Pambianchi has written books on homewinemaking. Avoid oxydation You need to be concerned about oxydation mainly after the completion of fermentation. Also oxidation is less prone to occur if the quantity of SO2 (sulfites) is sufficient, adding campden tablets can help if you want to age your wine for a long ...


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Yes you can. I've fermented apple wine this way on a DIY stirplate, 1 inch magnet, and a vintage arrowhead carboy (flat bottom). It wasn't powerful enough to make a deep cone for oxygenating which actually worked nice as I just wanted to deny the yeast the option to flocculate. My stirplate uses an old SCSI external 5.25 tape drive, so it's platform is ...


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Recipe: Grape Juice Yeast Making wine is more about process than recipe. With the exception of quality ingredients. Standard table grapes don't really make decent wine. This becomes incredibly apparent when you actually taste the juice from a true wine grape. I've dabbled in some wine making all from kits of different grape musts. When you taste the ...


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If you are using grapes, you can perform a maceration, where you will stir the solids in your must (or punch down the cap). But this is before fermentation. After the first racking, where you get rid of the gross lees. You end up with fine lees at the bottom of your container. Those may be stirred before the following racking (to keep them longer), as ...


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I have 20 years of winemaking experience, 15 years owning my own winery. Let me tell you what I did and what the vast majority of winemakers do. Very little. Use sulphites and maintain their levels based on pH of your wine. Keep your barrels topped up. Gently rack, but don't go overboard. Red wine, especially tannic ones, need some Oxygen to soften the ...


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I have made many amazing hedgerow wines without using sulphites. I started years ago by using recipes from old farmhouse cook books. These used just basic ingredients which I did too. Mostly I pour boiling water over the wild fruit, leaves etc. when making the first 'must'. Later (after reading more modern wine making books)I started to add some pectolase ...


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It's absolutely possible to do so. The main thing you have to watch out for is oxidation. A bottle of wine, once opened, is going to be consumed fast enough for oxidation to not be a problem. A cask/barrel will not (unless you're a true champ at drinking wine). The trick is to introduce an inert atmosphere above the wine as it's dispensed at low enough ...


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You need to check the gravity of the must/wine to see if fermentation has finished. Specific gravity tells you about the residual sugar in the must/wine. Specific gravity is measured with a hydrometer. (If you know about this then disregard) Bubbling can be from dissolved CO2 in solution. It will come out of the wine as the temperature fluctuates or if ...


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We use Campden (or the purer potassium metabisulfite or sodium metabisulfite salts). Initially, we use it to kill off any potentially harmful bacteria that may have hopped a ride in with the base ingredients we use in wine making, and to discourage any wild yeast from gaining a foothold. Campden will not kill yeast, but it creates an environment inhospitable ...


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My understanding is that commercial winemakers make extensive use of blending post-fermentation to create a consistent product. They will blend wines makes in the same year, as well as blending wines made in different years. The solera, used primarily in sherry production, is an expression of this process. Another chemical in the must that is important to ...


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A Sur-Lies is the process of allowing a finished wine to continue to sit on the lees in order to extract flavors from them. Mixing is used to accelerate the process of flavour pickup and break down of the Lees on which the wine is sitting. For a small batch I am not sure the mixing is a vital as for larger commercial operations. Furthermore, I don't think ...


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I made wine professionally for 15 years so I have punched down a lot of caps. It kind of depends on what style you are going after and what type of grape you are working with. I started off punching down 4 times a day on my red wines and later cut it back to 2 times a day after two well known wine makers told me 4 was too many. It is a lot of strenuous work ...


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In beer making, it's not uncommon to stir the yeast, "rouse the yeast" during the initial few days of fermentation - but only if you did not use enough yeast, or some other problem happened (like your temperature went very low). This moves the yeast off the bottom of the vessel (where it "flocculated" to), and re-mixes it with your beverage. It helps kick-...


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There should be no need to shake or stir after fermentation has started.


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Opti-red, is a yeast derived mix of polysacchrides, which are designed to bind to polyphenols/tannis and provide fuller body and better colour stability. I would not add more than the recommended dose, not becuase it will do you harm, but due to the fact the manufacturer has calculated and adding any more is a waste and may advresely affect the finished ...


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Calcium is not going to be an issue. The sorbate as a preservative is likely going to be an issue. Pitch more yeast than you think you need to overcome the preservative.


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Scaling is very simple math and works with all ingredients. For example if a recipe is for 1 gallon and calls for 4 oz of sugar. 1 Gallon has 3.79 liters, so 1/3.79=.2638 that's your volume % To scale the sugar 4×.2638=1.055 oz sugar for 1 liter. You don't have to be so precise, 1oz sugar in this example is close enough.


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Quick answer No. Longer answer no not exactly, you may or may not notice the difference if you took a gravity reading every 30 min, but if you just take 1 reading per day you are unlikely to notice. If you were to add the same proportion of yeast to the same volume then yes, in gallon vs 10oz volumes then you would see no difference. If you add the same ...


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Measuring Tannins in wine is a complicated process and needs a lot of chemical analysis in a laboratory. It can be done, but not within reach of your average person. Here is a snippet from a pdf on the subject: Wine total tannin: Tannins are a sub-class of phenolics that can precipitate proteins. They contribute to wine texture, particularly ...


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Punchdown refers to the action of pushing down the cap. The cap is formed during maceration by the pomace (the solids) that rise to the surface. Normally punching down the cap twice a day allows the must to be in contact with the pomace to extract more flavour and tannins. To answer your question, after crushing the must will form a cap after a few hours (...


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Never boil your grapes. It will ruin the flavor and make a hazy mess. Sulfites are a well known and used anti-oxidant. It's been used for thousands of years in wine. They pose relatively low risk. Your raisins and other dried fruit have way more sulfites than wine. Having said that, there are ways to make wine without it but it involves keeping air (oxygen) ...


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My experience with mead is that you should wait. What I do personnally is I bottle (I use twist-cap bottles which are not really air-tight), wait a few months and then siphon again to clean bottles, leaving just a bit more dead yeast at the bottom. My mead usually becomes really clear after about 8 months, and stops tasting yeasty at the same time. It's ...


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As it is the stage which contains the majority of the activity (the first 3-4 days 90% of fermentable sugars are consumed), it is also the stage when the majority of waste products are produced by the yeast. The temperature control over this period plus the variety of yeast used will have the largest affect on the flavour profile of the beverage. Obviously ...


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Some commercial wine producers do care about consistency and go to great lengths to ensure a consistent product. Others believe more in the variability and craft aspects of their product with a great year making a great wine and every year being different. Wine makers can add extra water to their wines or mix in a too dry batch; not allowed in France for ...


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My friend has tried this with Concord grapes and it was okay. The recipe he used was on this page: "https://www.baderbrewing.com/content/how-make-wine-concord-table-grapes" Good luck!


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I tried once to make a small quantity of wine from grapes I found in a grocery store. I had big hopes because they got a type of grapes that looked a lot like wine grapes (very dark and small). Even thought my process was good (already made wine from wine grapes), the end result was not good. So that means the grapes really need to be wine grapes. Make an ...


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I'm a designer specialising in wine packaging and I can say that, with the exception of 'great' wines, most decisions about glass are made on purely aesthetic or economic grounds. Great wines that are always aged for long periods are stored in green or brown glass to limit the damage caused by light over time. Wines like the Grand Crus of Bordeaux which are ...


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