7

It's a rough guide to how much bitterness vs sweetness is in the beer. BU stands for bittering units, most often as IBU - international bittering unit. GU stands for gravity unit - the number in thousandths after the 1 of the original gravity. A 1.040 beer has 40 GUs, while a 1.105 beer, has 105 GUs. It's a rough guide to how much sugar and thus sweetness ...


5

The easiest way to determine the effect of starter gravity is to decant the starter so the amount is negligible. In addition, I've found that it makes better beer.


5

If the starter fully fermented, most of the 1.040 should be gone; normal yeast attenuation is around 75%, so you should have 1L of 1.010 beer in the starter vessel. 1L of 1.010 beer into 19L of 1.076 OG wort would reduce the OG down to about 1.073. (76 points * 19L + 10 points * 1L) / 20L = 72.7 points = 1.073. Though if possible, you should try to cold-...


5

I don't have a lot of experience with recipe design, but I can provide some links. Check out this excellent 2010 article from Brew Your Own magazine on Black IPAs. It says that the Great American Beer Festival adopted that style as "American-Style India Black Ale", and the characteristics are: Color = 25+ SRM Original Gravity = 1.056–1.075 Final ...


5

You could try this, if you have an accurate scale: Dilute the syrup to a 10% solution, by weight. For example, 90 grams of water and 10 grams of invert sugar. Mix it very well, and measure the gravity with your hydrometer. The Brix/Plato scale on the hydrometer is the most useful here, as it shows percent sugar, as sucrose. You can use this reading to ...


5

To answer your question "What should I do with this maple sugar?" I'll say "put it on your oatmeal". Based on my own experience and that of several friends, it's nearly impossible to get maple flavor to come through in a beer. The fermentation blows away all of the delicate maple flavor and aroma. The one beer I've tried that had any maple character at ...


5

'Do you think this will work with most recipes?' I think it will. The thing about intentionally stronger flavors is that they tend to mask other unwanted flavors that develop over time. Precisely why brewing a light beer (say, a Helles) can be so difficult; every little flaw will come through, having no strong flavor to hide it. '...add more hops, more ...


5

It's impossible to look at a beers ingredient list and derive an exact recipe from it. You have to go through a process of trial and error, using any information you can get from the manufacturer combined with experience or intuition. However, the good news is that you probably won't have to do that yourself, because its highly likely someone else already ...


5

Dry yeast packets are generally enough for 3-6 gallons. So with 1 gallon, about 1/4 of one pack is plenty for a commercial dried yeast such as Danstar Lallemand Nottingham Ale yeast. And you most definitely would not need 2 packs! Even 1 whole pack is a major over-pitch.


4

Sima is a traditional Finnish drink that is basically hard lemonade... In a large non-reactive pot (stainless steel or ceramic coated, NOT aluminum), boil 3 liters (+ 1 cup to allow for evaporation, spillage ect.) of water with 2-3 cups white sugar, brown sugar, honey or any combo thereof (more sugar = more alcohol). When dissolved, add 2-4 thinly sliced ...


4

It's the ratio of Bittering Units to Gravity Units. Higher numbers indicate more perceived bitterness. The intention is to create a balanced beer. The high finishing gravity of strong beers offsets the perceived bitterness. Hence, strong beers need more hops to achieve the same level of perceived bitterness as weaker beers. You calculate the BU:GU by taking ...


4

Recipe: Grape Juice Yeast Making wine is more about process than recipe. With the exception of quality ingredients. Standard table grapes don't really make decent wine. This becomes incredibly apparent when you actually taste the juice from a true wine grape. I've dabbled in some wine making all from kits of different grape musts. When you taste the ...


4

Adding to @FranklinPCombs's answer, if you have a CO2 canister, prefill your bottles with CO2 before filling them. That will guarantee that the head space contains no free oxygen and might buy you a little more shelf life.


4

Are you really looking for body when you say the flavor was empty? You may need a little acid blend in the final product to brighten the flavors. Cider as a beverage is normally pretty low on body. Next time I'd try an English Ale yeast which will attenuate slightly less, leaving you some natural apple sweetness. At packaging you can add in a little acid ...


4

I wouldn't advise. Idk if the husk has tannins but I assume it does, because "corn hair" does. In any case boiling will extract tannins if the water isn't treated to be blow 6.0 pH. I'm sure if you still wanted to try it, you could taste the water before hand to see if it has the astringent properties of tannins. Best to just add some flaked maize to the ...


3

I disagree it's perception. I have had similar issues with some beers that they are wonderful for a couple of weeks then go downhill. I'm focusing on either contamination or oxidation. I find the issue is less apparent if I prime in the keg with sugar. And I have also had it happen with one keg of 2 of a 14% beer - one keg is still pristine while the other ...


3

In my opinion, metrics and analytics are always important, and useful. The problem is pitching your idea to a broad enough audience to get it off the ground. Without mass data to back everything up, you won't be able to justify the work. If you intend to do it for yourself only, well I honestly wouldn't bother, since I know what I like, and what I don't ...


3

In your position, I'd just brew it, and see how you like the outcome. Many factors affect perception of bitterness - it's far from an exact science. For instance, if the recipe has been stored for any length of time at room temperature, the hop alpha acids in some hop varieties will have deteriorated up to 50% in 6 months. But let's look at the theory all ...


3

With a starter that large, it's best to pour off the starter wort. To do this, you can either leave it for a few days for the yeast to settle out, or put the starter in the fridge a few hours before it's needed. Either way, once the yeast have settled, you can pour off the starter wort. You can then put the yeast somewhere that's close to pitching ...


3

Purism aside about whether peated malt belongs in an Ale, I used peated malt in a Scottish Ale - just 0.7% of the grist. While I can't say I noticed a specific smokiness, there was a lot more going on in the beer ingredients-wise, but it did lift the ale and add complexity. I was very happy with the result. So, I'd go for 1%. Best to add too little and ...


3

As a Scotsman and a professional brewer the answer to how much peated malt to put in a Scotch Ale is zero. The smoked malt beers I first came across were German never Scottish. In Scottish breweries we used to pay special attention to testing for any peated malt contamination of our malt deliveries because so much peated malt could accidently come into ...


3

The ingredients definitely do not translate exactly. Like hops you will also want to add them at different times during your wort boiling or right before you seal for the amount of bitter flavor vs other aspects they can provide (preservative, sweetness, earthiness, etc). I only have a few years experience so I don't want to lead you astray with estimates, ...


3

First off you are not crazy, adding fruit to alcoholic beverages is an age old process. You have a few options, you can add the peaches to the secondary, minus the syrup. If the peaches are straight from a can they will have been pasteurized so you can add them straight in if you wish. You may want to freeze them first to break down cell walls and extract ...


3

The most important things for a beer to have a long shelf life is the quality of the beer to start with. Having a flawless beer will have nothing to hide and will age much better. One of the most common problems with hoppy beers is they cover a lot if sins, but as the hops fade they reveal the off flavors that were there all a long. Diacetyl is at the top ...


3

You've covered most the bases so without going into too much "why" here are some suggestions. The Why The key to light body sweetness are simple sugars (monosaccharides) but these are the easiest for yeast to eat. Larger molecule, harder to ferment sugars impart a cloying body and a slick mouthfeel. Suggestions Underattenuation. Stop fermentation early. ...


3

Ignore yeast in the recipe. If you can't get it, you can't get it. Look for dry yeast that meet what you need: Most yeast have "good for" style list. Choose one that's good for your style. Alcohol tolerance must be equal or higher than you expect in your beer. Temperature range you can actually get. With these three, you should get good enough results. For ...


3

I don't really view the C120 or the Special B as being roasted malts that would contribute significant bitterness issues. So one pound of Roasted Barley seems spot on and not an issue as far as bitterness is concerned. I have added more than 2lbs of RB, BP and chocolate in combination and not worried about bitterness. I would be concerned about using the ...


3

Your recipe look completely fine to me. Your malt bill looks OK. Your OG will be ever so slightly higher, and color may turn out very slightly darker but not enough to care about. "Finishing hops" are not added for bitterness, they're there for flavour and aroma and don't actually add significant bittering, since it's the extended boiling of hops that ...


3

In general, when it comes to modifying extract kits, you have a few options to make it better: 1. Add less water to increase flavor and alcohol content (ex: 20L instead of 23L) 2. Steep some specialty grain to add flavor (depends on the type of beer) 3. Add some hops (dry hopping or boiled) to add more flavor/bitterness 4. Add Dextrose (sugar) to ...


3

Scaling back just the base malts (fermentables) will lean a style to have more mouth feel body and make residual unfermentable sugars more noticeable without the alcohol to "cut" them down. These changes can also be countered by water dilution. If you had a 4% ABV recipe and scaled back the fermentables 25% it should still be pretty close to style and ...


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