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12

The main difference is the yeast, Ale is brewed with a top fermenting yeast s.cerevisiae[1] whereas Lager is brewed with a bottom fermenting yeast s.pastorianus[2]. From this comes the fermentation temperature, ales are fermented at higher temperatures(14-20 C) than lager(10-12 C). A lager you would also allow to warm towards the end of the primary ...


6

In addition to Mr_Roads answer. Lager yeast is unique from ale yeast in that it can breakdown and use melibiose, which is a sugar not fermentable by ale yeasts. This is one reason lagers are generally "cleaner" in mouth feel and residual sweetness over ales with the same recipe.


6

Mistake 1, really doesn't matter all will be fine. You may end up with a little more bitterness extraction, but is has been reported that FWH can lead to a more mellow bitterness. I really would not worry at all. Mistake 2, not really all should be fine You would get a cleaner flavour profile if you had used 2 packets of yeast,but your yeast should be ...


5

Oxygenating the Wort and use of Yeast (Micro)Nutrients This made a noticeable difference to my beers, especially those over 1.070.


5

Simply put, there are two overarching umbrellas in beer... ales and lagers. An IPA is an ale. GENERALLY speaking all beers fit under one of these two umbrellas. Once under one of these umbrellas the main difference is brewing technique. Even if you use the exact same ingredients and technique between a beer with ale yeast and the other with lager yeast, one ...


5

I would give it a try. I have done this with a Sanke keg several times. Couple thoughts: - If it is an old Pepsi corny, you may be able to unscrew the pressure relief valve, remove, use an air lock or blow off tube. - Once activity has slowed, (Like only a few points above terminal gravity) replace the pressure relief valve and let it naturally carbonate. ...


5

A Spinzall culinary centrifuge in continuous mode – fed by a built-in peristaltic pump – could feasibly accomplish this, provided that the compressed volume of gunk in a normal home brewing batch is less than about 500ml (which would fill the open bucket rotor and require a pause to clean it out and re-sterilise). Incorporating normal home brewing ...


4

Hop residue will be a problem. Even if you use pellet hops, you will get clogs in the dip tube or valves when trying to purge the trub from the bottom of the keg. I know this from a disastrous keg-hopping experiment. You'll want to exclude hops when transferring the hot wort to the keg.


4

This is not a great hobby if your goal is to save money on beer costs. It takes a long time to recoup the cost of equipment when you save pennies per glass. And there is always more equipment to try... That being said, the cheapest and lowest risk way to get into the hobby with making one-gallon batches. You can get a one-gallon recipe/ingredient kit from ...


4

This is an old thread, but I cannot believe no one answered to use the Brew in a Bag method which means you mash in your boil kettle. No extra vessel needed. You line your boil kettle with a mesh bag and when the mash is complete you remove the bag and all the grain. This is how I brew every time now, and I don't have to store the mash tun any more.


4

This is a super old thread but I had to deal with this recently and I was very happy with my results. Living in a walk-up second story apartment in Chicago, space being limited I purchased one of these Ikea BRIMNES wardrobes. As a 5 gallon + 1 gallon extract brewer, this fit all of my equipment perfectly, gave my carboys a nice quiet place to sit during ...


4

I wouldn't advise. Idk if the husk has tannins but I assume it does, because "corn hair" does. In any case boiling will extract tannins if the water isn't treated to be blow 6.0 pH. I'm sure if you still wanted to try it, you could taste the water before hand to see if it has the astringent properties of tannins. Best to just add some flaked maize to the ...


4

If you are using grapes, you can perform a maceration, where you will stir the solids in your must (or punch down the cap). But this is before fermentation. After the first racking, where you get rid of the gross lees. You end up with fine lees at the bottom of your container. Those may be stirred before the following racking (to keep them longer), as ...


3

I started off brewing in a dorm room. If you bottle in 12 oz bottles it is more work, but they'll fit under a bed (or at least the one we had). You can easily fit batches of beer under there. Another good option is the bottom of the closet and stack things on top. For both, I like to keep them in the 24 bottle boxes you purchase new ones from.


3

I disagree it's perception. I have had similar issues with some beers that they are wonderful for a couple of weeks then go downhill. I'm focusing on either contamination or oxidation. I find the issue is less apparent if I prime in the keg with sugar. And I have also had it happen with one keg of 2 of a 14% beer - one keg is still pristine while the other ...


3

Pectin can make a major contribute to the methanol levels in cider(hard cider). Methanol results from the decomposition of pectin into Galactose. If you do not add pectinase and/or pasturise your apple juice before fermentation you can significantly reduce the levels of methanol in the final product. Although it is rarely above 0.2%. Here is an interesting ...


3

There are mainly two issues when dealing with pectins: The haze it can cause, and this is just cosmetics Pectins being very large molecules make filtration very difficult A rule of tumb is to use low to medium pectin content fruits: High pectin content: tart apples, citrus fruits, cranberries, currants, gooseberries and sour plums. Medium pectin content: ...


3

As long as you want. As with anything, there are considerations: Hop Flavor and Aroma This is a big one. Hop compounds break down and dissipate extremely quickly. If you want a fresh hop flavor and/or aroma in the finished product you need to serve the beer ASAP. Age doesn't impact the bittering nearly as much, however. The second consideration with ...


3

I once left a red ale in a glass carboy for almost a year. My girlfriend thought it was ruined, but I kept the airlock full.... it came out great, clear and mellow. Beer I would have paid money for....


3

5gals/24L of beer made with 1Kg of (liquid) malt extract and 1Kg of sugar will be rather weak/thin. I would recommend at least 2Kg (or even 3Kg) of malt extract with the sugar in 5gal/24L. Depending on the hop variety the hops might be increased to (for example) 100g, especially if more malt is added. Meridian is quite a dark ("amber") coloured extract so ...


3

Most of the time mead makers don't cold crash. Just let it sit and it will clear over time. If you want to speed it along look into wine fining agents.


2

After startup cost of equipment, ingredients can be cheap if you brew within a somewhat narrow style range and buy ingredients in bulk. That said you can almost eliminate startup costs if you choose to brew in smaller batch sizes that allows you to use equipment you already have. Like your largest stock pot and you sink for chilling. As you get better at ...


2

The more you do (the less others do for you) and the more you buy the cheaper it will be. Go all-grain, grind your own grain, buy in bulk. Assuming you can store them properly, begin buying base malts and hops in larger volumes. Since you'll likely have only a few malt varieties on hand, you 'll need to adjust your recipes to use the base malts you have ...


2

I always recommend to novice brewers that they try to make a 1 gallon batch before investing in all the equipment. Most people already have kitchen equipment suitable for making 1 gallon of beer and any additional equipment is easy to find like a 1 gallon glass or plastic jug. Any decent homebrew supply shop should sell 1lb bags of malt which you can make a ...


2

A boilover is an even greater disaster in a small space situation. A few glass marbles dropped into the brew pot prevents most boilovers. Don't worry, the marbles can take a lot more heat that your stove can put out.


2

Cleber, I'm trying things very close to what you're thinking. I'm no chilling, fermenting, and serving on kegs. But I think an extra keg could be a good thing. If you have one, I think it is useful to transfer from the no-chill to the fermentor to aerate your wort. I'm doing this over pressure to ensure air contact. Otherwise you can aerate another way and ...


2

In theory, you can make one, and it may be pretty tricky depending on batch size and containers. did you want to make one for 5gals? or bottles? or some other size? The hardest part is getting it balanced. if its unbalanced your going to have a disaster waiting to happen, either bearings fail, or the shaft etc. but the basic build is going to be a disc ...


2

There should be no need to shake or stir after fermentation has started.


2

In beer making, it's not uncommon to stir the yeast, "rouse the yeast" during the initial few days of fermentation - but only if you did not use enough yeast, or some other problem happened (like your temperature went very low). This moves the yeast off the bottom of the vessel (where it "flocculated" to), and re-mixes it with your beverage. It helps kick-...


2

1. Hops before boil This won't be an issue if the recipe calls for them to be a 45min+ addition. 2. Yeast pitch If the recipe calls for two, then use two. Most yeast packs are intended for 5 gallons of 1.040 wort. More yeast is needed for higher OGs. The LHBS may have been inclined to allow for more ester profile, since it's a Belgian Strong which relies ...


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