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7

It's fine. I assume the beer is still actively fermenting, in which case not only will freshly-produced CO₂ (somewhat) displace the O₂ in the headspace, but the yeast can still clean up any O₂ that does dissolve into the young beer. Many high-gravity beers actually forcibly inject O₂ during the early stages of fermentation to get a solid ferment. RDWHAHB.


3

One thought I have is it's due to incomplete fermentation. Cold crashing a beer after a week will not necessarily make the best beer. Try leaving it in primary for 3 weeks and see if it improves.


2

Probably nothing to worry about. As the yeast drops out of suspension, the perceived colour becomes darker, as less light is reflected by the yeast. The yeast in the darker batch is likely dropping faster than the lighter batch. Give them a few weeks and the colours should be the same.


2

An extra airlock isn't a bad idea, but I'd also recommend having a bucket and some sort of tubing/equipment for a blowoff tube setup. There seem to be a lot of ways people set this up, and it's nice to be able to swap out the airlock for a blowoff tube (I actually have a disassembled airlock with some tubing attached that I keep in a bucket for this purpose)...


2

I would presume the beer is still good to bottle - but leave it (at least) for a full 14 days before attempting to prime/bottle/keg. I have had the plastic lid blow off the fermentation bucket on previous occasions. I put it back on and continued with the brew. Once the beer was a little more sour than I might have liked but it got drunk anyway... The rest ...


1

As Denny Conn suggests in his response, the simple answer is to leave the beer on the yeast for longer. During the secondary fermentation stage, the yeast is still working. part of this includes "cleaning up" some undesirable by-products of fermentation. I would guess that it is some of these compounds you can smell. Dropping the temperature to 25F / -4C ...


1

It could be oxidation causing the color change. This can happen if the cider is sloshed/splashed during transfers after fermentation is complete.


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