10

This is no problem at all. To address your questions: "what effect (taste, strength, yeast effects) might I expect from adding the sugar at the start of fermentation?" Priming sugar (almost definitely glucose a.k.a dextrose), being nearly tasteless and highly fermentable (90+%), will increase ABV% without adding either residual (unfermentable) sugar or ...


9

Most of the priming sugar available at homebrew shops is finely granulated dextrose/corn sugar. It can be confused with; but it is not confectioners sugar. Most confectioners sugar contains anti-caking agents in it, like cornstarch or silicates. Neither of these are necessarily good for your beer. I stopped buying "priming sugar" from the shop and ...


9

You will need to add the right amount of priming sugar to carbonate the beer in the bottles. There are lots of online priming sugar calculators. In theory, you could bottle the beer before fermentation had completed, and let the remaining sugars carbonate the beer, but this would be very hard to do right. If you bottle with too much residual sugar, your ...


6

I use the same amount of priming sugar, in the batch, and I use a mix of bottles. 12oz and 32oz. and they carbonate the same. if you are adding sugar to individual bottles, then the amount would be different. so the answer is Yes, for priming the batch, No if you add to each bottle.


6

Bottle bombs are usually beers that are about 10 gravity points above terminal gravity for standard 12oz bottles, then hit TG in the bottles. So 1.020 SG when 1.010 is TG. For typical normal carbonation, 3-4 points above TG. Most 5 gallon batches call for about 4oz of monosaccaride priming sugar. Rather than trying to make bombs and risk a mess and ...


6

If you have added approximately the right amount of priming sugar and your beer is not carbonated at all, your problem probably is not the amount of sugar added. A common problem is inadequate mixing of the priming sugar in the batch, but this doesn't apply here because you indicate that you added sugar to each bottle individually. Other potential problems ...


5

Based upon what you said, namely that you only have the one container and it is currently filled with your cider, here are what I see for the pros/cons: Adding it directly to the bucket will give you a consistent carbonation because, as has been mentioned, you can make sure it is uniformly mixed. The downside to this is that you'll stir up the junk that is ...


5

If you follow a process like this, you won't be far off: Dilute the syrup to create a 10% solution. E.g. add 10g of syrup to 90g of water and stir well. Take the specific gravity of the 10% solution, e.g. 1.030 Express this as a fraction of a 10% solution of sucrose, which has specific gravity 1.040. So, our example of 1.030 is .75 the gravity of a 10% ...


5

In your case, I believe you are asking whether you can bottle without adding anything and expect the beer to carbonate based on residual sugar -- on that point, yes, you do need to add some sort of fermentable substance for the yeast to produce the CO2 for in-bottle carbonation. But for the record, if we read your question literally, then no -- there are ...


4

Given the time factor, and that it has lost it's body, I would bet on contamination here. While a white ring in the bottle is a typical indicator for contamination, it isn't a necessary factor. One other thing to try is to degass some of the beer by stirring/sloshing in a large container and then take a gravity reading. My guess is that it's below 1.007, ...


4

Optimal about 18C-20C. But almost any temperature between 5 and 25 will work. If cooler then it takes longer. It is possible to go higher but there may be some more fruity esters produced although not very much... Best keep it at lower temperature range of 15-20C for about two weeks or so.


3

Everything is fine. Apple juice is almost entirely fully-fermentable sugar; there's no real reason to add more sugar unless you want more alcohol. If you do add sugar, though, you should probably dissolve it either in the juice itself or some water, before adding it. Only 8 hours into the fermentation, you could probably get away with gently swirling the ...


3

Corn sugar is a monosaccharide where cane sugar is a disaccharide. Both are entirely fermentable but the disaccharide must be cleaved first. If your yeast are stressed they'll have a easier time with the monosaccharide. Corn sugar monosaccharide is usually glucose. There is some evidence that glucose fermentations produce higher ester levels. All things ...


3

In short corn sugar is more similar to the sugars in the wort so it's easy for the yeast to consume both. Other sugars are harder or easier for the yeast to consume and come with their own issues. Typically corn sugar is preferred. As adjuct and priming sugar.


3

The process used by many home brewers is roughly this: Boil the priming sugar with enough water to make a syrup. Cool the sugar solution and transfer to a clean, sterilized bucket Transfer the finished beer to the bucket, mixing with the sugar syrup Stir gently so the sugar is evenly distributed. Be careful not to splash as this will introduce oxygen and ...


3

"Or do I rack to a larger 5 g bucket/carboy with no spigot, and mix in the priming sugar at at once. Then just siphon out into the bottles." Given the equipment that you have and your objectives, this is the best option.


3

4 g/L is a reasonable amount of priming sugar. It will add around 1 volume of CO2. Beer fermented at room temperature will contain round 1 volume of dissolved CO2, so adding the priming sugar brings the total CO2 volumes to 2, which is a typical carbonation for many styles. There are a lot of priming calculators available online. You enter the beer's ...


3

I have been using regular supermarket sugar cubes ( Domino Dots ) in 12 oz bottles. They are 198 to a lb which is 2.3g per cube. Which is 2.5 volumes of CO2. I ferment in my bottling bucket so my choice is cubes for about 1¢ each or carb drops for 9¢ each ( 60 for $5 ). Sugar Cubes have worked for me.


3

You are correct when you say the warmer the brews are stored the faster carbonation will complete. Carbonation is a mini fermentation, so ideally you would want it to complete around the same temperature as you brewed your beer. Higher temperatures for carbonation can produce or accelerate the production of of flavours in multiple ways, the first that ...


2

Hehe, yeah, 10 days very unlikely to be enough time for fermentation to complete and is less than the "old school" method of 7 days primary, 7 days secondary, 2 weeks bottling. I once (notice the "once") bottled after 9 days because I was leaving on a trip and wanted the beer to be done when I returned. Although the gravity was close to where I thought it ...


2

Yes, it is standard to add sugar for priming, as most beers are fermented to completion before bottling. The chocolate roasted malt does not have extra sugars, exactly. The kilning process is going to convert some sugars, caramelize some and also produce some other color and flavor compounds, but those sugars are going to be present (and some unfermentable) ...


2

It is almost certainly not confectioner's sugar, but instead dried malt extract (DME), which has a very similar super-fine powder consistency. While DME is all malt sugar, confectioner's sugar is a mix of finely-ground table sugar and corn-starch. You do not want corn-starch in your beer. Alternatives for priming sugar are pretty much any pure fermentable: ...


2

I suspect it has to do with the ratio of liquid volume to gas (head) volume. When bottling each bottle has a certain amount of headspace, while when kegging the amount of headspace relative to the liquid vloume is much smaller since there is only one vessel. Now, I am not talking about the speed of carbonation, just the final result (the equilibrium): http:...


2

I think that 80g seems like not as much as you could've gone, however you'll still definitely see some carbonation. I'd recommend something about 100-105g or 150g of DME dissolved in some warm water. Other than that, you should be fine. It's better to under carb then over carb and get bottle bombs!


2

adding your sugar to secondary then cold crashing, the yeast may start eating sugar and fermenting again even at near freezing temps (not likely but possibility), and then you would need to add more sugar to bottle, but you would have to know what your SG is before and after cold crash, to calculate how much more to add. what i would do is transfer to ...


2

I think you mean a 5 gallon batch (19 L)? I don't know your specific recipe, but the corn sugar is usually for priming the bottles for carbonation after the beer is done. So you would boil your extract and hops, cool it down and put it in your jar or bucket for fermentation, add the yeast, and wait a week or two for it to be done. After all that, when the ...


2

Yes in theory it is. but no real way to tell, until serving time. one way to tell is either hook up a regulator to it and get the pressure, or press the gas in valve without anything hooked up to see if its building up pressure.


2

I wouldn't expect to hear anything. It's a closed system, the CO2 is dissolving into the beer, not bubbling to the top - as there is no pressure difference for the bubbles to "gurgle-into" (your bottles don't gurgle right!?) It would be absolutely normal for this to work fine. Even clear beers can have ~100 ppm of yeast cells. So unless this beer was ...


2

No need to cool it down. I don't. Beer turns out good anyway. Yeast doesn't die because it's such a small volume of hot liquid in a much larger volume of beer.


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