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An interesting question. 1- metabisulphite is usually regarded as an oxygen scavenger and thus a preservative by virtue of inhibiting bacterial (and yeast) growth (but not so much the metabolism). Metabisulphite in solution can also be a source of SO2 - which reacts in water to make an acid solution. That acidic solution could be regarded as acting ...


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Primarily its a subject of dietary preference to avoid additional sodium in the diet. However, its a moot point because generally a very small amount of sodium would be being added. Also potassium has a somewhat higher flavor threshold than sodium. Meaning sodium begins to taste saltier sooner than potassium. (at least this is the case on my palate) ...


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I am assuming that you are making wine. For beer, neither sorbate nor SO2 have a place, since homebrew either creates carbonation from fermentation in the bottle or via CO2 injection in a keg, and usually there is no residual sugar to worry about for "re-fermentation" later in either case given timelines for deciding when to bottle/keg, meaning re-...


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Sulphites are used in a lot of wines, ciders etc and as a general food preservative. So long as you aren't adding more than the directions call for you should be ok, especially if the packing doesn't give you warning. I use it for my wife's wine and cider at 1/4 teaspoon per 5 gallons. If you still want to rinse ensure you use sanitized water or you could ...


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1) Yes, it's true. It's not a sanitizer. 2) This is dry sodium or potassium as a by product after absorbing oxygen. Can give off flavors. 3) NO Metabisulfites (potassium and sodium) are not sanitizers. They're actually preservatives. They work by depleting solutions of oxygen to prevent aerobic organisim growth. They don't kill anything on contact as a ...


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It is possible it could work, but you have to be pretty lucky. The chance of getting some local acetobacter or wild yeast that could survive and spoil the wine would be high. If you have a bunch of grapes and used them to prime your grape juice, that could be a better way than just stirring outside, as the yeasts on the grape skins are what was the ...


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It is possible he is correct. The reason they have the message required for 10ppm is that probably the mean is 2-3ppm, but if something happens in manufacture that requires a large dosing then the level detectable is higher than 10ppm, this may be a rare occurrence or due to natural fluctuations in raw materials that require differential treatments. It is ...


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The chances of this working are about zero. It will eventually ferment, but the results will probably be bad. If you want to get yeast into the grape juice in a natural way, you can put a piece of fruit or berry into the grape juice. The best thing is to find some Organic grapes at your local grocery. I say Organic because there will be a better chance they ...


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It's kind of a poor sanitizer in general with that concentration. It's not that it is bad for beer, it takes 5 minutes to sanitize. It will work, but you're going to have to be extra patient and careful. Trying to use the rest will have not paid off if you ruin one batch. Buy a bottle of star-san and keep the metabisulphite for when you want some non-...


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Let me answer your questions... metabisulfites (potassium and sodium) in strong enough concentrations can be a very effective sanitizer. In stronger doses, potassium metabisulfite works well to sanitize your equipment, with no negative consequences. Make a solution of 8 teaspoons dry measure of potassium metabisulfite added to 1 gallon (4 liters) of warm ...


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Add the campden tablets and once they have dissolved you are good to go with your bottling. For further reading: http://www.eckraus.com/blog/add-campden-tablets-to-wine


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Yes you can. I have a video here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ayd9AKN8-R0 K-meta, i.e. potassium metabisulfate, is fine not to rinse after using, however I personally would still rinse most equipment but not bother with bottles or fermentors (I would rinse something I was going to drink within 24 hours).


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