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IMHO PET bottles will keep beer very well for up to 6 months. Beer can be kept longer than that but I have noticed that "fizzy drinks" PET bottles can lose pressure after a year or so. Apparently the PET used is very slightly gas permeable. There are bottles on the market with an O2 barrier inserted in the bottle walls, eg - Coopers brown plastic bottles. ...


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If its food grade plastic then sure it shouldn't be a problem. I wouldn't recommend racking after a few days for no reason other than getting into a new container. You don't want to separate the cider (or beer or wine) from the fermenting yeast too soon. After a few days some of that yeast is likely to already be flocculating out, but its still active and ...


3

Although it doesn't say they are food safe, those plastics are relatively safe at room temperature. Beer lines are made from PVC and PTFE is used a lot in kitchenware. Of course, we don't know exactly how they have been processed/handled, this is still guesswork. No-one here can tell you if they are food safe/acid-safe etc.. just by looking at them. An ...


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I'm guessing you are talking about making a data logger to monitor fermentation temps, mash temps, etc. Your question is quite vague and you need to clarify it to get better answers. What temps are you talking about, environmental conditions, etc. What parts are going to contact the beer/wort? A drawing would help. I've used weatherproof electrical ...


2

A lot of brewers use silicone tubing for hot liquids, but there's no reason aside from cost not to use it for racking as well. That will take if the tubing part but you've still got to deal with the racking cane which is rigid. Copper or stainless tubing could be bent into the correct shape.


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It seems the problem you have is with being able to keep pressure in a controlled way. If the only issue what the container you could always use a PET carboy or something similar. There is no way this could be made to handle the amount of pressure a normal beer would be carbonated at; both in the wall of the container and the cap. My suggestion would ...


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Its your first brew; I wouldn't worry about it. It will get consumed fairly quickly. Certainly before an big bad PET issues arise...if you believe in that sort of thing. Don't worry about putting the whole batch in the fridge either. Just put in what you can and replace them with other bottles as you have space. It is recommended to put them upright. ...


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Hosing is a pain to clean, no two ways about it. If a soak in oxygen wash (PBW, etc) and vigorous pumping won't do it, there are long, thin brushes they make for this purpose. However, it's advisable to just simply replace the hosing every so often, and keeping extra hosing around is always a good idea. It's probably the cheapest part of your brew system, ...


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According to the guys at this sour-only brewery they use only glass, stainless or wood. Plastic lets in too much oxygen, leading to acetic acid. Also, the shape of a barrel allows them to eliminate the air space above the beer by topping up periodically with fermented beer. BTW that link is a 3-1/2 hour podcast, but I'm 95% confident the content is in ...


1

I've had a number of beers and meads that after a week, fermenting in fridge, have had the bucket covered in mold. I don't know which kind of bucket you use, I use these. Since they are very well sealed, every time I had this "problem", I washed the exterior with a washing brush and sprayed a sanitizer all over the exterior. Until now I had no contaminated ...


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Yes! The spigots will be able to support your desires to mash. That being said: to maintain efficiency - because single walled vessels lose heat via conduction more easily than double walled vessels. The other point is that your mash is bound to get stuck in the spigot. The other downside is that it involves more parts to clean that can house bacteria and ...


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For anyone else looking for advice on this here it is from my experience. PET bottles are fine for storing beer from 6 months to a year (perhaps even longer) in the right conditions. In my experience I brew and bottle and place the PET bottles in boxes in the garage, the garage ranges from 8 degrees C (I am in the UK) in the Winter to 25 degrees C in the ...


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Probably - but I wouldn't Material Type: Plastic This is not very informative, and i couldn't find any details. If there is a food safe symbol on it, it shouldn't introduce any toxins to your food in realistically expected use cases. Including common accidents like unintentional boil of your mash. And there is no real difference between accidental or ...


1

Large plastic containers (especially food grade containers) usually make excellent fermentation vessels if a bubble trap is fitted or any closure/lid/cap is not fastened tight but can allow CO2 out as fermentation proceeds. Failure to allow CO2 to escape will cause bottle inflation and possibly bursting. Many home brews are made in 25 litre plastic buckets ...


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I am convinced that the answer is that the PTFE probe is definitely safe, and it is unclear whether the PVC is safe, or whether it would leach unknown quantities of pthalates into your beer. PTFE is the chemical name for Teflon. As we know, Teflon is considered chemically inert and safe for use in food applications, including on no-stick cookware, as long ...


1

WOW! good detailed question! I have no actual experience with this specifically but I can sympathise with the chemical/material compatibility question. I have most always had success with searching the great world wide web, with "*** vs. ****", in your case "PVC vs. alcohol" (by the way a search for Polyvinyl Chloride worked better than "PVC"). In the link ...


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If the sanitizing solution is no rinse, you shouldn't rinse it...that's what "no rinse" means! If you rinse you pretty much negate the effect of your sanitizer. There is no need for the bottles to dry before using. Just drain out as much liquid as possible.


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If vinyl isn’t the gold standard for homebrewer’s tubing, I don’t know what is. It’s good to ~170° F max. As Tobias mentioned, silicone tubing is used for higher temp transfers. Purchase anything anywhere “Food Grade” and you’re good-to-go for low-temp homebrew, but I wouldn’t get too creative with random hardware store DIY bric-a-brac without the “Food ...


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Yes you can! Just make sure that he threads and inner seal of each cap is good before you sanitize them and pop them onto your brand new fresh brew! A good thing to watch out for is overtightening just like simone above mentioned, the pressure bulges the cap up and can compromise the airtight and beer tight seal.


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I know your looking for larger, but thought others that find this thread might want to consider this. Large volume isn't the only reason to go to conical $100 http://beersmith.com/fastferment-an-affordable-conical-beer-fermenter/


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