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5

Specifically when using S-04 (or most other English Ale yeasts) they are very sensitive to temperature drops. Other strains might tolerate starting so high, but the cooling wort is likely to send an English strain into hibernation early. While pitching S-04 at 80F may or may not effect viability; as the wort cools the yeast might go dormant. Most English ...


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Sorry, but your beer is probably not going to be drinkable. If you're lucky, the wort was infected by a wild yeast. In this case, it may taste a little funky but will still be beer. The more likely scenario is that your beer was infected by bacteria or mold, and will be unpleasant or undrinkable. Since you've already pitched the yeast, you might as well ...


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With a starter that large, it's best to pour off the starter wort. To do this, you can either leave it for a few days for the yeast to settle out, or put the starter in the fridge a few hours before it's needed. Either way, once the yeast have settled, you can pour off the starter wort. You can then put the yeast somewhere that's close to pitching ...


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As Fraklin commented, the best way to know is by measuring the specific gravity. This will tell you how much sugar is in the wort/beer, both before and after fermentation. When you are getting stable gravity readings over a couple/three days, then you the yeast is done. If the gravity is still "too high", then you know the yeast have stalled out, or the ...


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From my perspective, you're taking this temperature thing way too seriously. I mean, it is important to respect temperatures when brewing, (especially for mashing) but in the fermentation process, you should not see any significant differences within the range of 2-3°C. your yeast performs best in the range 18-23 degrees, a 0.9°C difference should not ...


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The Mr Malty yeast calculator (need flash installed) has an option to calculate how much yeast cake you should re pitch. Its a ballpark estimate since one yeast cake isn't the same as the next, buts it at least attempts to quantify how much you should use. You can also scoop up some of the cake, put it in a glass jar with some water and shake it up, and ...


2

No specific proportion. Quite a few people reuse the whole "yeast cake". There are a few gotchas, though. One of them you kinda mentioned - it's not just yeast in the "cake", but all other stuff you don't want to bring to the next beer, like hot/cold break, grain particles, hop material. Another gotcha is that yeast in the cake is usually tired: it ...


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If the starter was on the stir plate it is aerated already. You will however, be introducing oxidized wort from the starter into the beer. This could be an issue for flavor later on, but it being a big beer with rich flavors it might not be noticeable.


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OK, a couple things. One, don't make a starter for dry yeast. It has many more cells than liquid so a starter isn't needed. In addition, dry yeast is coated with a nutrient and if you make a starter that nutrient won't be available in your beer. Second, the OG isn't all that high. A single pack of rehydrated dry yeast will be plenty. Make it easy on ...


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I often pitch the yeast as soon as I reach the highest temperature that is supported (depending on the yeast it can be around 25°C to 28°C). Many books and articles mention that the wort is most vulnerable when it is cooling down. The heat no longer protects the wort and other bacteria could contaminate it, so it is better to pitch the yeast at high ...


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I suppose you want to know how cold does it need to be, so that once it is combined with the other half, you get 70°F ? It depends on how hot is the wort on the stove, once you know that temperature, you can calculate it based on the volume. In any case, you can't let it freeze or it will be hard to transfer. If one half is close to the freezing point and ...


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The esters which provide the banana aroma are only formed at the start of the fermentation, when the yeast grows and multiplies. And indeed underpitching is part of this. However, after your first beer, the yeast has multiplied, and so if you would or had pitched your new beer on this yeast cake, no more (or much less) banana esters would have been formed. ...


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If it's a style suited to souring, maybe it'll end up interesting… :S But you left un-sterilized sugar-water alone for 6 days. Bacteria reproduce really fast, much faster than yeast actually, but the side-effects of a healthy pitch of yeast usually crowd them out. I don't have high hopes. If you're limited on fermenter space, dump it and get the next ...


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Not particularly worrying. If temperature is under control and yeast amount is right, then head space as others say - as well as using a blow-off tube rather than a traditional air lock.


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Most likely it will turn out just fine, but you did add risk of infection keeping the lid off for a while. In future you should keep the lid on it, just to keep any wild organisms from flying into the beer and causing infection. I myself will often brew in the evening then let the beer cool overnight, with the LID ON, then pitch the yeast the next morning, ...


1

I do this all the time because I'm too lazy to wait for the last 10 degree or so when I cool my wort. I rehydrate my dry yeast in some sterile warm water or wort and after it's a nice slurry, I pitch it around 85f and never had a problem. The wort is usually cooled off before the beer really starts going. Or you could pitch some Norwegian Kviek it actually ...


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Actually, no, that is not good practice. Always pitch relatively cool, and either keep the temperature stable, or only let it rise, but not too much. If yeast started at a certain temperature, then there is a big chance that it will stop fermenting if the temperature drops. And 83F (28°C) is much too high to start. It will not kill your yeast, but make a ...


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An update to my original question in case anyone stumbles across this in the future. Around 24-36 hours after asking this question the primary fermentation began - indicated by a krausen which formed at the top. This is the slowest start to a fermentation I have had and I can only assume is down to conditions described in the OP damaging the yeast somewhat. ...


1

If the water in the sauce pan was hotter than 80°F. I'm thinking it was since it only took a few seconds for a few° rise. What mostlikley happened is most of the yeast in closest contact to the pan water was instantly killed. The other yeast also would have experienced a rapid expansion damaging the cell walls. Repitch it. This time just put your yeast ...


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There's a couple of concerns regarding this: The longer your beer takes to begin fermentation, the longer it is prone to (more easily) become infected. Depending on how slowly it is being cooled, you may have clarity issues. You need to chill it quickly to form a good cold-break which is essential to clarity. That said, 8 hours isn't a terrible amount of ...


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Look up some information on no-chill brewing, which is a method for doing exactly that. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/No_Chill_Method One drawback is that if bacteria or wild yeast does make it into your wort, it will have a head start on growth, where otherwise the inoculation of brewer's yeast might overpower the bad bugs and minimize impact. ...


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Agree with Evil Zymurgist 100% but wanted to emphasize something. I've never heard that lower fermentation temps will encourage ester production. Also, definitely use a hydrometer for any level of precision. Forty hours is enough time to ferment a significant percentage of your sugars. I'd be willing to bet you've probably been getting a higher alcohol ...


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13 brix / 1.050 SG and 21°C/69°F in a 10liter / 2.6g batch your yeast is going to go nuts leaving almost no residual sugars and make the complex alcohols making the nail polish (solvent-like) off flavor, and a 4-5%ABV "soda" if allowed to complete. Generally a ginger beer uses a "ginger bug" that ferments just enough to carbonate. Or is stopped by ...


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I wouldn't risk piching your expired yeast for a kolsch, this is a style that should have very low, subtle to no yeast esters. Your old yeast may be still have a partial viable cell count, but it would produce too many growth esters for the style. If this was a style that has strong ester profile (belgian, wiezen etc). I would pitch the old yeast in hopes ...


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I would just keep it refrigerated. If your new yeast are to arrive in two or three days, it'll be faster than testing old one. And assuming old one is dead, keeping wort at fermentation temperature is far worse than keeping it refrigerated. It's already chilled, keep it that way. What I would try to do, and I hope you did if it was possible, would be to ...


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I would take some of the wort and make a starter with the yeast. If the yeast is good it should start fermenting sometime in the first 24 hours. If it doesn't I would throw it in the drain and wait for the new yeast to arrive.


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Agreeing with Franklin. Taking the specific gravity readings over 2-3 days is the best practice. You could also pick up a refractometer to take gravity readings if you need to. I use one since I do 1-2 gallon batches frequently and only larger batches when I know the recipe is good. EDIT: As a note from a commenter, refractometers do not give direct ...


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