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7

The prevailing wisdom on these so called "east coast" IPAs is three fold: The use of ~10% of flaked oats in the grist. A combo of super huge late kettle additions as well as dry hopping. Lastly, the use of London Ale III from Wyeast (Wyeast 1318). Despite London Ale III being a great flocculating English Ale yeast, in the presence of huge amounts of hop ...


5

Bottle conditioning, not to be confused with bottle aging, is only for natural carbonation. You want to use a monosaccharide sugar like powdered corn sugar so it's easily and completely consumed by the yeast. Using DME, honey or anything more complex will leave unfermentable sugars and other compounds in the beer, resulting in flavor and mouthfeel changes....


4

Two weeks doesn't seem like an inordinately long time for a true double IPA. Also depending on the OG 1.019 might be the bottom. As this was an extract beer I'd be surprised to see a double IPA go to 1.010; unless this is something you've brewed before and gotten to that point. I'd say warm it up to 70-72F and give it another week. Stirring, IMO, is a ...


4

The earlier in the process you add it, the more flavor you'll lose. The aroma will be boiled off or driven off by CO2 during fermentation. Boiling might extract flavor, but I'm guessing. no idea Add both


4

For an American Pale Ale, I'd stick with American hops. Saaz is the classic Czech Pilsner hop, Hallertau is a German noble hop. If you use those, you may end up with something between a Pale Ale and a Czech or German Pilsner respectively. I just had a Azacca SMASH and that was great, so my personal favorite would be an Azacca pale ale.


3

If I were to choose only one hop for an APA, it would be Centennial, similar to other hops specifically used for an APA, a little less “grapefruit” notes then Cascade, but still fruity with some pine notes with a clean finish. This one will work and you’ll be pleased with the results.


3

No Caramalt is its own thing: https://bsgcraftbrewing.com/simpsons-caramalt https://bsgcraftbrewing.com/crisp-cara-malt-15-25-kg It typically comes in around 15°L, so any crystal/caramel malt in that range should make a fine substitute.


2

I don't think you can do it with just that grain bill. For that look and mouth feel you need to use oats or a lot of wheat. Use a high mash temp for bigger protiens. Short boil to keep the proteins, avoid the hot break, basically a slow simmer just for hops and sanitation Slow chill to allow more chill haze, avoid the cold break. Doing this will make a ...


2

I would actually encourage you to HOLD UP on changing the yeast. First of all, you didn't indicate what yeast you actually used. I'm assuming its a neutral ale yeast (US-05, Nottingham, Muntons, etc) because you really don't want a ton of yeast flavor in a Rye Pale Ale. That style highlights the weird spicy flavor of the rye along with a nice hop wallop, and ...


2

Stirring won't hurt it. US-05 is not generally problematically flocculent so you shouldn't have to though. If there is still a cap of kraeusen on your beer, it's still fermenting so I'd probably leave it alone myself. Two weeks is a long time for fermentation to finish out. If you are near the bottom of the yeasts temp range, I'd suggest moving the ...


2

If it tastes like an APA, then it is an APA. The judges don't get to see your recipe. Always enter based on taste, not based on recipe.


1

You may or may not see bubbling in the airlock. With a lot of head space, it may be reduced, and you may not notice it at all. Watching the airlock is like reading tea leaves... could be true, could not be. The only way to know how fermentation is progressing is to take gravity readings. If the gravity is reasonably close to the expected final gravity and ...


1

I have actually had pretty good experiences with beet-derived sugar. Do you by any chance sterilize your sugar by boiling sugar water or by heating the sugar? Sweet, caramel and burnt sugar tastes can come from actual burnt sugar, I have made that mistake once.


1

All the "Cara" malts are malted for proteins and unfermentable sugars, to add head retention and body. (Dextrin malts) Usually Cara malts will be matched with the base malt. In your case carapils, carafoam would interchange with little flavor difference, since "caramalt" is basically crystal-20 with protein malting. Using carapils or other light cara malt ...


1

Has the yeast settled to the bottom? I'd let that happen rather than stir it in.


1

At least here in the US, the dominant yeast suppliers are Wyeast and White Labs. Since you're talking about the differences of switching between strains of yeast I'd say it'll be most beneficial to consult the lab whose yeast you're getting. They'll give you tons of strain-specific info about flavor production, optimum temperatures, pitch rates, all that ...


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