6

This would be the final answer for me, but I left Evil Zymurgist's answer as accepted since he pointed me in the right direction. I just wanted to let you know, in case anyone else could find this useful. Hydrochloric acid alone worked perfectly, the bottle was put into it for less than 20 minutes, and after that it was rinsed with water (almost no ...


4

I was very excited to see what the community had to offer for this problem as I am in need of a cardboard box replacement as well. Unfortunately, it appears that www.cwcrate.com is out of business. Therefore, I continued to search for a solution. I found the following sets of plans to make wooden crates: set 1 -- enclosed box: these look really nice, but ...


4

Soak in StarSan. Mix starsan as you would normally. Submerge bottles and soak for a day or so. Use a stainless steel scrubber (ball of stainless steel for cleaning pots/pans) to scrub off the paint. I've done this on 100's of bottles. It's really effortless with the scrubber. Side note I wouldn't recommend clear bottles for beer or anything hopped. (...


4

Vaseline is petroleum based and will degrade black orings. Use food grade silicone spray to keep your keg seals fresh and lubricated.


4

There actually are a number of references in the literature to this issue. In general it seems that a standard target would be pitching (or to be more accurate, ensuring there are) 1 million healthy cells per milliliter of beer. I found a few references to actual bottle conditioning, and some to cask conditioning. I can't see any reason they wouldn't be ...


3

Typically, the Hop bitterness in beer lessens over time. So, you should expect the first taste of the beer to be more bitter than the last drop.


3

For long term storage with crown corks (aka: caps), you want to keep the bottle upright, this prevents the content from damaging the seal on the cap. If you are doing long term storage with corks, you want the bottle to be left on its side, or a slight angle, ensuring that the cork is kept moistened by the contents, this prevents the cork drying out and ...


2

I would be surprised if there is any merit to it, at least as far as my understanding of the science behind the oxygen absorbing crowns go. O2 can't simply be absorbed - it has to bond with another substance and oxidize it. The idea is that there is a substance in the crown that when activated by becoming wet will bond with O2, causing the chemicals in the ...


2

It appears that there are both homebrew and commercial issues with absorbing crown liners causing some issues. There is a tweet circa 2010 by Ray Daniels (Cicerone) claiming 2/3s of a loss of aroma within a couple of weeks. I don't know how accurate this claim is; however, I can tell you that I use the caps with my beers, and if I'm drinking them within 6 ...


1

Since this question involves estimation and I haven't actually run the proposed experiment myself or recorded specific data, I'll take my guess based on what I think I might know based on 20 years homebrewing experience. To be "clear", what I personally would be aiming for is not to settle out obvious chunks of yeast and hops, but rather the finest sediment ...


1

For cold crashing we go from tank temp to 4C in about a day, that is due to the limitations of our cooling plates and chillers. If we could drop a tank from 18-20C to 1C in 12H I would take that. ~1.5C/H gets the yeast to go to sleep and drop out. Anything below 4C and even using a lager yeast it will be effectively stopped, and starts sedimenting out. Y ...


1

My version of the events is that beer wasn't completely fermented initially, and those residual sugars initially masked bitterness, which, as sugars get fermented, becomes more prominent. In keg setup the effect of that later fermentation may not be as visible, but I sometimes notice it with bottles (even when I bottle after I reach calculated FG and check ...


1

Last couple pints can be more bitter if the beer had micro hop particles that settled out. Edit: If your beer gets hazy towards the end and increases in bitterness. You have a concentration of matter that CAN increase bitterness. This can be avoided with better fining of the beer before kegging.


1

Being involved with the AHA and having judged national finals several times, I can tell you there are 2 concerns...first, there should be nothing on the bottle to identify it came from you. That's not too difficult. But with the number of entries we get these days, storage is a concern. The reason you should use standard 12 oz. bottles and caps is so that ...


1

Between checking a box and padding, you're looking at an almost unreasonable amount of space required, and considering how insane some airlines can seem to be with their checked baggage fees, I'd recommend an alternative: Go to your local store that carries clothes of any kind, the cheaper the better, buy the cheapest socks you can buy that are big enough ...


1

I have used the Pig for almostcask ale. It's okay. It goes flat within about 2 days, so I wouldn't let it sit around for much more than 48 hours. The restrictor plate could probably come out, and since there's no way to compress the container you probably need to keep the hand pump around to introduce a little pressure into the pig so the liquid can flow out....


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