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Clove-ey flavor in my experience is due to Yeast health (namely- hot fermentations) Chloramines in water Bacteria infection My prime bet is fermentation temps- you say you ferment at 66-68F - is this ambient temp- or temp controlled? Are you pitching your yeast when your wort is hot? I would discount an infection (#3) if the clove doesn't develop to ...


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Looks just like a little bit rushed for the total schedule. It wouldn't have hurt the beer any to let it finish out at the warmer temp of 60F. Instead your data shows you started to chill it back down while it was finishing. In the future, take a sample and taste it before chilling to lagering temp. Take a sample and microwave it for 30 seconds and that ...


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It sounds like you have a sanitation problem. Clove flavors (derived from a compound known as 4 vinyl guaiacol, 4VG for short) are produced by POV positive beer yeasts (e.g. Belgian Abbey and German Weizen yeasts), by some wine yeasts, and by most wild yeasts. The latter are most likely your problem. However, not all such flavors are really clove flavors. If ...


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Possibly, but you need patience it seems/ It is probably because of the baking soda that your wine tastes like this. You can't remove the molecules that are responsible for this anymore from your wine. However, I read that this is readily used, but you need a month or two for the results of this addition to drop out from the wine. I have made wine already ...


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Short Answer: Oxygenation or Yeast Did you stir it enough to oxygenate the wort? Did you use enough yeast (you must have, sorry answered this one for you)? How did you store the yeast? Yeast age? Longer Answer: Diacetyl is made at the start of fermentation by the yeast and is absorbed towards the end of the fermentation. A brew that a weak yeast or ...


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