6

Usually the biggest concerns of a slow chill are.... DMS (cooked corn flavor) is created from SMM when wort is hot. DMS will form until below 140°F (60°C). SMM is boiled off during boil, it's why we do an open lid boil. SMM has a half life of 37 minutes. 90minute boils usually reduce SMM levels below the perception threshold. Unwanted bittering late ...


5

No chill, slow chill = more IBU from late hop additions No chill concerns for hops is late additions will continue to isomerize until below 175°F. Removing the hops will help, but any alpha acids already released in the wort will continue to isomerize. Some recent studies show that 175°F isn't like a switch, but temperature and time follow a curve for ...


3

I've been doing this for years but with the spear removed and a 2" tri-clamp fitting. Fermenting a no-chill IPA now!


3

I've done this once with second runnings with a corny keg. I filled the keg right after flame out, then placed into the cooler. Once chilled I transfered to carboy for fermentation. Had no negative effects on keg or beer. The pressure drop from contraction is so minimal the keg and valves are unaffected. I guess if there was say 50% head space then the ...


3

You're right that dead yeast is a good nutrient for live yeast. The growth medium used for yeast in the lab is YE (yeast extract) plus some sugar. This plan will probably provide some nutrition to the yeast, and work out OK for a few batches, but I think that problems will crop up. You won't actually make yeast extract. Yeast extract is made inducing '...


3

Regular Polypropylene will release mild to moderate toxins at high temperatures. While Polypropylene (PP) is food-grade safe at room temperatures, and commonly used for containers (arguably safe for chilled wort according to comments in the previous link), the Energy Working Group gives it a "low" rating for overall hazard. My recommendation, don't use it ...


3

I can't comment on the safety of the material, but I can say that No Chilling does not really work if you try to drop the wort temps down before adding the liquid. When the wort goes into the tank, it is the fact that the wort is very close to 100C/212F that guarantees against infection while its sealed. The super-hot wort does a wet pasteurization of all ...


2

I made a great Falconers Flight IPA using no chill last winter. I simply added a sufficient bittering charge 40-50 IBUs at 60 minutes. Then added 3 oz of pellets at Flameout. Put the lid on and walked away. I transferred to the fermentor the next day. With a couple days left in fermentation I added another 2 oz of FF pellets to the fermentor. 5 days ...


2

I'd suggest you do a basic bittering addition, then do a massive "flameout/cube" hopping, like 3-4oz of something pungent. Ferment with a clean yeast, and that will give you some idea of a baseline for non-dry-hopped hop aroma and flavor. I did this basically with EKG once, and it was underwhelming, but good hoppy beers are tough to nail and it could have ...


2

You should be fine. I always boil the hops normally (without a bag), then filter the boiling hot wort through cheese cloth to get the hops and protein out. After that the still very hot wort goes in a closed fermenting bucket and stays on the counter over night to get to pitching temperatures. This works fine, but don't try to let unfermented wort sit for ...


1

Try No Chill brewing where you don't worry about chilling the wort. https://beerandbrewing.com/no-chill-brewing/


1

I can think of a few possible things that might differ (assuming your recipe takes the cold water addition into account): You've already mentioned the sterilising effect of boiling. Boil volume can have an effect on hop isomerisation - the lower the volume, the lower the IBU. pH has an effect on hop isomerisation. A change in cooling rate will also affect ...


1

I just realized that after fermentation is done, I will need at least an extra keg to transfer my beer out of the fermentors, anyway. My batches are of 3 kegs. So I will need to take an 4º keg to transfer the first. After that, I could just drain and clean the emptys one by one and do the other transfers. So what I've done was to fill the 3 kegs with ...


1

I think you could skip the CO2 & shaking in step 2: The bike pump should be able to make more than enough pressure to seat the seals, especially if they are well lubricated. The only question is whether air will go in fast enough. So maybe use a mountain bike pump, not not a road bike pump. The bubbles from the pump will do a more than adequate job of ...


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