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9

It's not at all ruined. The airlock is working exactly as intended. Unless there is a growth of mold all the way up the blow-off tube and into the fermentor, you're fine. It's not so much that the bleach evaporated as it was denatured by the copious blow-off material. You don't need to "re-up" on bleach (you really don't even need bleach) so much as discard ...


4

Seems like pieces of a pellicle from bacterial infection. Sanitize everything with bleach, rinse properly with water and then starsan.


4

It's likely that your pellets had some very finely chopped hops in them. They have escaped the bag and triggered a bit of bubble formation in the beer, bringing them to the top of the beer. Hopefully they'll stick to the fermenter when you rack or bottle.


3

StarSan is a sanitizer, not a cleaner. I'd use Craftmeister alkaline cleaner. Amazing stuff and makes PBW look weak. Or just buy a new bucket.


2

Your Mold or fermentation is not touching the edge of the carboy due I would imagine to the dished bottom or side form of the carboy, which is forming the interesting looking krausen. Looks like yeast is getting started. I would always pitch a packet of yeast along side wide fermentors, but I am paranoid. Good pictures btw.


2

I'm reasonably certain its beer ;) Even a pale ale looks dark in a carboy when it clears. Your yeast is settling to the bottom and in that process the beer at the top is clearing. But this beer is having trouble clearing. That looks like a lot of sediment for a secondary on a pale ale, to me. My recommendation would be to crash cool it. That will help ...


2

I was once told that a general rule is any white infection is salvageable as a sour if you so choose, any green must be dumped. Personally I hate sours and will dump all infections, and that's definitely infected. Dump it, don't even bother tasting it


2

Toxins produced by fungi (mycotoxins) will often not be broken down by heat. If you have had a funky mould growing on your cider before fermentation, then I would probably ditch the whole lot and start again. Mycotoxins can be exceedingly dangerous. This paper is relating to beer toxins but similar applies to cider: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/...


2

IMHO mould growth is not often fatal to brewing but you should remove the fungal mycelium, preferably before it spores, with (e.g.) a spoon and continue fermentation. Seems like a lot of air/head space above the brew in the bucket. Maybe worth using a smaller container to assist the build up of CO2 and make the protective "gas blanket" that CO2 provides.


2

Unless whatever you're bottling is genuinely, horrifyingly undrinkable- I'd never pour anything out before bottling. At any rate- it won't hurt you. It's really difficult to tell on a picture through a carboy- but it's probably normal coagulation of some oils and starches in your beer. The rough picture may have some folks tell you it's a lacto infection- ...


2

Yeast is a mould (fungus), so you want your ginger bug to have mould. If it has brightly coloured mould - black, red, yellow, discard it. Generally yeast will stay in suspension for a while, before settling to the bottom, making a creamy-white layer. While it's fermenting, yeast produces a lot of weird smells. If it's stopped bubbling, the yeast has ...


1

Looks like a standard beginning fermentation. I wouldn't worry yet. Give it time, it will likely turn out alright.


1

It's difficult to know for sure. There are many, many kinds of mold out there, some are harmless, and some are toxic. I'm hoping someone can chime in who knows more about mold than I do, but here are my thoughts: A 20-minute boil definitely killed the mold organisms. Assuming it's in a sanitary container now, I wouldn't be concerned about the mold coming ...


1

Depending on what bucket you use, it might just be easier to buy a new one. :) Otherwise, get an unscented soap and wash properly. Rinse, wash again, just to make sure. Rinse well. And verify that you got everything. You can now use StarSan to sanitize your fermenter. after it has been cleaned.


1

Wine vinegar? If the acetobacter was still alive it could be eating up the new alcohol, making more acid and maybe the floculant stuff too. Idk, just a thought. Also, may not have caught a wild yeast, and there is no alcohol, and any number of organisms can be at play. Did it carbonate? Did you take OG / FG readings to get an ABV?


1

You can get very close to free with using a little diluted dollar store bleach. When you rinse it, rinse it well, then take a blow dryer and run it through the airlock for a few minutes and it will be dry.


1

Couple of things if you plan to keep using these air locks it's fine to rinse everything with water but run sanitizer through it. I keep sanitizer on hand in a spray bottle for all sorts of things. Try spraying a generous amount in the air lock after rincing gunk out of them. It might not be "free" but throwing out a bad batch because of an infestation is ...


1

What you're describing is called a colony of cells called a pellicle. According to Home Brew Talk's wiki: A pellicle is a lumpy, slimy white film that is formed by some strains of wild yeast, notably brettanomyces, during fermentation. A film on your beer in the fermenter or the bottle almost always indicates an infection, unless you have ...


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