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3

For any brew, if you think it might be stuck, watch the must, and watch the airlock. If you see any sign of bubbles rising, there's a chance that things are still plugging along. That said, CO2 can take a while to dissipate, so the presence of bubbles is not a guarantee of continued yeast action. A better measure, although it requires a bit more patience, ...


2

It sure looks like fermentation has happened to get that much sediment. Since you didn't take an initial gravity reading it's going to be hard to tell for sure but you can track if it is still changing and as Lucas points out, you should be able to have a rough guess on initial OG. Agitating the the must might get the yeast going again. I'd possibly be ...


0

I've seen these go up to 16%, but not 18.8%. Three options here: Your hydrometer is off You actually had very good yeast nutrition and managed to push it even higher (e.g. some Champagne yeasts have been reported to go up to almost 21% abv with a good yeast nutrition schedule) Assuming you did not heat up your must, you may have a wild yeast. It's unlikely ...


8

A few things come to mind: Two weeks seem a bit short for fermenting out a mead - I would say it can take 3-4 weeks. Your mead might still be tasting of honey and water because there is not full alcohol development yet. Do not taste test - but use a gravity meter. The good thing about honey is that it's pretty predictable when it comes to calculating OG ...


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