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Good luck with starting a brewery! A two week fermentation time is a bit long for a commercial brewery, I believe. You can probably shave a few days to a week depending on your gravity, yeast, and pitch rate. Your cold crashing and carbonation time is going to depend on your equipment. How fast can your equipment chill the volume of beer you will be ...


4

Don't rely on Beersmith/software for the timing of any stage of the process. Brewing is predictable to some extent, but it's not that clear cut. Ferment your beer until it's done. You already see to understand the stable FG rule so that's good. After fermentation, you'll transfer to a bottling bucket and add your sugar. You want the beer to condition (...


4

Simple and IMHO best advice is to continue with the brewing/bottling process as normal. Nothing that has been written above indicates any immediate problem. I would advise not so much opening and closing of the vessel during the main part of fermentation. IMHO it is good to take the O.G. then leave the brew to ferment for (say) 12 days without being examined....


3

Totally possible. It's all about the style, equipment, and mostly how much yeast. A standard beer with low ester requirement can be fermented, fined and carbonated in litterally a matter of hours with enough yeast and right equipment. IPAs are best fresh but many need dry hop time which would add to your production time and is hard to rush. There's no ...


3

Maturation begins the moment fermentation completes, up until it is consumed, therefor no, it does not need to be carbonated. Since maturing the beer is another way of saying "aging the beer", the temperature will vary depending on the current stage it is at. For instance (assuming an ale yeast strain), once primary fermentation completes and maturing ...


3

One thought I have is it's due to incomplete fermentation. Cold crashing a beer after a week will not necessarily make the best beer. Try leaving it in primary for 3 weeks and see if it improves.


3

The presence of yeasty dust in the bottle and some carbonation leads me to believe you can expect these to carbonate normally. I have lagered beer at controlled temps for at least 5 months and gotten successful bottle conditioning. Issues holding yours back are likely the temp swings. Move the bottles to someplace closer to 70F and try and hold them there....


2

After 5 months of cold storage, there would but next to no viable yeast left in the beer. Store it for a couple more weeks, somewhere warm, and you may get lucky. If not, you'll want to remove the caps, add a couple grains of dry yeast to each bottle, and recap. Don't worry too much about oxygen, as the renewed fermentation should consume any oxygen that's ...


2

Aging in the carboy or demijohn or whatever is called bulk aging. Once it's bottled, it's called bottle aging. As you have noticed, it's different, and primarily results from the volume of the container. Large containers age slower than smaller ones, however you want to bulk age so it's all aging together before you divide it out into individual bottles. ...


2

Dry airlock - You may be ok, it's not an ideal scenerio, but the dry air lock alone may have been enough to protect the beer for a couple days. Cross fingers. Super bitter - check your recipe, double check hop addition times and amounts, type (pellet, whole). If the recipe doesn't call for aging, some over hopping may have happened. Time will most ...


2

Never had bottle bombs, but what I would do is the following: refrigerate all bottles, and carefully open and re-cap each one. You release the extra pressure, when opening the bottle and will stop the yeast from producing more CO2 with cooling the beer.


1

That's only aroma, how it smells. You are lucky. It could also smell sulphury, which does not in itself indicate a problem, but in that case it could be that the yeast had not had enough nutrients. However, if it smells like champagne or wine, and it gets you an appetite, that is a good sign. Also, since this is a rather light beer, it will not smell as ...


1

Did you use pellets instead of leaves? If so, you need to adjust the amount downwards. My experience is that there is not a one to one relation between pellets and leaves. Erlo


1

When you bottle do you add a yeast inhibitor like Camden / Potassium Metabisulfide? Or do you allow bottle conditioning to produce some carbonation? Both methods for still or carbonated wine have an impact on the finished flavor. Slightly more attenuated carbonation adds a little bite to flavor and dryer mouthfeel. Camden depletes oxygen to prevent further ...


1

As Denny Conn suggests in his response, the simple answer is to leave the beer on the yeast for longer. During the secondary fermentation stage, the yeast is still working. part of this includes "cleaning up" some undesirable by-products of fermentation. I would guess that it is some of these compounds you can smell. Dropping the temperature to 25F / -4C ...


1

I think you're confusing two different things. the reason to raise the temp toward the end of fermentation is to make sure the yeast is active enough to finish the fermentation. That's commonly done with both ales and lagers. as an example, I ferment most ales around 63F, but after 5-7 days at that temp I raise it to make sure fermentation is done. after ...


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