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dmtaylor and Mr_road have good answers, and aiming for a temperature in-between is the easiest way to achieve your goal. However, you can increase or decrease your temperature if you want to try. Here are a few tips (some that I found here: https://homebrewacademy.com/missed-mash-temp/ ) To increase temperature Add boiling water Heat the mash directly ...


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For most of our brews we shoot for 65°C (148°F)for 90 min, we find this gives us a highly fermentable wort with enough longer chain dextrins for good mouthfeel. This is the usual temp I see most of my colleagues going for apart from those doing the more weird stuff. For stouts we shoot for 68°C (155°F), for more mouthfeel. I believe that in older less well ...


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Excellent question, which I know every detail-focused brewer wonders about at some point. The reason we don't go up to alpha temperature right away and then drop down is that the beta enzyme denatures relatively very quickly above about 150°F (65.6°C). You could look into the actual science on this but in my estimation it seems the majority of beta ...


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That all looks correct to me. Well done. P.S. Gosh... I haven't calculated a recipe by hand like this for many years. I used to do so a long time ago, when I first adopted homebrewing software (I use StrangeBrew 1.8). But I also understand the want or need to develop your own spreadsheet, and cheers to that! (I love Excel. I live in Excel. I've used ...


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You could start with this question from this forum to know how to turn potatoes into a sugary solution fit for fermentation. Mind you, mashing not only means to mush the potatoes, but to add crushed barley malt and water. The crushed barley malt enzymes will turn the potato starches into sugars. Click on the tag "mash" to get more information. However, ...


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