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6

Excellent question, which I know every detail-focused brewer wonders about at some point. The reason we don't go up to alpha temperature right away and then drop down is that the beta enzyme denatures relatively very quickly above about 150°F (65.6°C). You could look into the actual science on this but in my estimation it seems the majority of beta ...


5

You could start with this question from this forum to know how to turn potatoes into a sugary solution fit for fermentation. Mind you, mashing not only means to mush the potatoes, but to add crushed barley malt and water. The crushed barley malt enzymes will turn the potato starches into sugars. Click on the tag "mash" to get more information. However, ...


4

Yes, your thinking is on the right track. Mashing with crushed grains at an appropriate temperature (about 150 F or 65 C) for at least 45-60 minutes then draining off basically creates your own "extract" so you don't need to add any DME or other sugars. From there you will continue to boil and add hops and brew in the normal way. For a great introduction ...


2

Unadjusted readings from refractometers are accurate only with no alcohol present in the sample. So taking a reading on fermented beer will not give you an accurate specific gravity. Also, as an aside, mashing cooler would cause higher conversion rate (not lower). As long as you had it hot enough (but not too hot to cause the denaturing), then the ...


2

The amount is dependent on desired speed and temperature constraint, possibly the condition of the grain. Make test batches and time how long they take to reach full conversion under your conditions. Any amount of enzyme held at a temperature within its active range will eventually convert all of the starch. Too slow of a conversion and you risk ...


2

When making spirits, the goal is usually to create a quick and clean fermentation of mash. If the tap water in your area would prevent the fermentation from being clean or fast, then a mineral or spring water would be fine. I see no problem in using either water if both are good for yeast.


2

For most of our brews we shoot for 65°C (148°F)for 90 min, we find this gives us a highly fermentable wort with enough longer chain dextrins for good mouthfeel. This is the usual temp I see most of my colleagues going for apart from those doing the more weird stuff. For stouts we shoot for 68°C (155°F), for more mouthfeel. I believe that in older less well ...


2

As mentioned, all-grain brewing replaces the DME (and LME) used in the brew-day part of extract brewing. However, I thought it might be helpful to call out a some exceptions and related concepts that might be helpful as you're getting started. Firstly, DME isn't necessarily 100% absent from all-grain brewing. DME is often used when making yeast starters and ...


2

I suppose you want to know how cold does it need to be, so that once it is combined with the other half, you get 70°F ? It depends on how hot is the wort on the stove, once you know that temperature, you can calculate it based on the volume. In any case, you can't let it freeze or it will be hard to transfer. If one half is close to the freezing point and ...


2

That all looks correct to me. Well done. P.S. Gosh... I haven't calculated a recipe by hand like this for many years. I used to do so a long time ago, when I first adopted homebrewing software (I use StrangeBrew 1.8). But I also understand the want or need to develop your own spreadsheet, and cheers to that! (I love Excel. I live in Excel. I've used ...


1

This sounds like a simple case of mis-interpreting the refractometer. But the typical way to check for lowest possible final gravity (i.e.: remaining unfermentables) is to do a "Forced Fermentation Test". Essentially this is taking a small sample of the wort and giving it an abundance of yeast and warmth to see just how low the yeast will take the ...


1

If your OG was only 1.022, you must have done something wrong during crushing or mashing, it is way too far. You can test the conversion at the end of the mash using the iode test. This will give you an indication if the conversion was a success. Did you follow instructions regarding mashing? To brew the Rogue Chocolate Stout clone homebrew recipe, ...


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