Hot answers tagged

18

The "cara" in CaraMunich indicates that it's a crystal malt. It's essentially "mashed" in the husk, then kilned to produce sugar and a glassy kernel, like other crystal malts. Munich malt does not go through that process. It's a relatively dark kilned malt than can be used as a base malt. Their flavors and uses are very different. Munich can be combined ...


9

This technique of holding back the extract until the end of the boil is a fairly new concept that's caught on in the last few years. Here's some reasons why its a good idea in general: Faster time from the start of the boil to the 1st hop addition Less chance of a boil over Less caramalization/Mailiard reactions of the extract (leading to lighter colored ...


9

Even if jsolarski's hunch is incorrect (that your extra DME is for priming the bottles), and it was actually meant for the boil, the beer won't be ruined at all. You just missed the original gravity target, which means: the beer will finish drier than it otherwise would have (lower original gravity will usually lead to lower final gravity) the balance of ...


8

How are you measuring gravity? I would double-check your gravity readings. If you are using a refractometer, you'll need to correct your reading because they are not meant to be used after fermentation begins (because of the presence of alcohol). If you're using a hydrometer, you need to de-gas your fermented sample enough to ensure that your hydrometer ...


8

I would think not. SMaSH means single malt and a single hops. The point is simplicity and purity, where emphasize the flavor of a single malt and single hops. Adding additional ingredients will change the attributes of the beer, which will means that it is no longer a single malt. But IMO, the more important question is why do you care? Beer is a beverage ...


7

DME stays fresh far longer than LME. Old, oxidized LME has been pointed to as the source of "cidery" off flavors in homebrew.


6

They're possibly weevils. The one in the middle looks like it has a long 'snout' that weevils tend to have.


5

The definition of SRM scale is based on the absorption of light at a single wavelength, so it's only measuring one aspect of color. The way the SRM views color is similar to how things look when you put them behind a yellow filter. Beer color is of course more than one-dimensional - reds, oranges, even some green, but these are not taken into account ...


5

Like Tobias said, corn is made mostly of starch and lack any enzymes which can convert the starch to fermentable sugars. Since you are asking for stove top, I am going to assume DME/LME and the corn will just be your adjunct. However, if you are just going for corn, you will just need a lot of it. So back to your question! Yes, you can does this on stove ...


5

I strongly doubt it will stand up to boiling water. Also boiling water isn't a guaranteed way to sanitize equipment - bacteria can still remain in hard to reach places. You should instead get hold of a sanitizer specifically developed for brewing: Iodophor, Star San are the two most popular.


5

Do not do this! Speaking from experience. I accidentally put my auto siphon into a bucket that was full of near boiling water. I turned away for just a minute and the plastic had softened enough that I now own a "J" shaped autosiphon. Needless to say I can't use it anymore. If you want to boil sanitize equipment like this you can get a stainless racking ...


5

A question akin to "how long is a piece of string?" I hope knowledgeable readers will forgive me rehearsing the "received wisdom". Malting is the process of causing the barley seed to sprout and in the process release/produce enzymes (basically "amylase" and perhaps "protease") that inter alia can be used to convert contained starch to fermentable sugars. So ...


5

As the other answers have stated, the malts are indeed different. As with all malts, they can vary between malt companies but these varieties are different regardless. Perhaps more importantly, Munich is a base malt that is provided by many maltsters, while CaraMunich seems to be a Weyermann product. As for the individual differences, I find that viewing ...


4

LME is 20% water, so if you're changing a recipe, make your conversions appropriately. Provided they're both fresh, I can't speak to noticing any quality differences, but that's just me.


4

English chocolate malt provides color with more smoothness and less roast character than typical US chocolate malt. Brewery.org says this on it's malt 101 page Chocolate Malt - ( Brown malt) 400 L British Chocolate malt is ideal for British Porters and Brown or Mild Ales and even Stouts. It's a little darker than domestic Chocolate malt yet it ...


4

If you're using a pre-hopped extract, no boil brewing is possible. All extracts have already been boiled by the manufacturer anyways; with extracts, the main purpose behind boiling is you need the higher temperatures to cause isomerization of the hop acids so the hop bitterness gets into the beer. Secondary reasons for boiling extracts are additional protein ...


4

Yes, you are correct and no they're not.


4

It can help head retention and other aspects of the beer with the right grain bill, but fully modified malts don't benifiet from it. Typically a acid / protein rest is applied to release the amino acids needed for yeast to produce good clove esters for appropriate styles. Moderately-modified malts benefit from a protein rest to break down any remnant large ...


3

Spent grain goes bad fast, and when it goes bad, it's bad. And not a little bad. bad. not even bad in fact. bad I've used spent grains in compost for a long time and if you don't mix it in while it's still hot (or if you're unlucky enough to leave it sitting for a few hours or - god forbid - days) you will face a soul-crushing, stomach-lurching, ramped-up-...


3

I have to agree with dax, it really depends what you are making. If you are in fact making a cider you might not want to boil it to utilise the wild yeast that is present on the peel of the fruit. If you are reading a recipe that is specifically mentioning your malt extract (or brewing kit) and it mentions that you need to boil it, then it probably means ...


3

Stored cool, dry and out of sunlight, DME is good for 2+ years. The main issue is with it picking up moisture, when it then becomes clumpy. But once boiled it's still good and you can use it up to 5 years in small quantities (say 1-2lb/0.5-1kg in a 5 gallon batch.)


3

In general, darker malts have more concentrated flavor, since the darker compounds created in Maillard reactions and/or caramelization (pyrolysis) and carbonization at high temperatures have a stronger taste. However, although color is a significant indicator, it's only a one dimensional indicator, and doesn't capture all the details of flavor. For example,...


3

Unfortunately, you may wind up with a cloudy beer. Boiling will have "set" the natural pectin (the stuff that makes jams and jellies thick) in the raspberries. This will likely result in a beer that will never really get bright and clear. Not that I would expect an IPA to be crystal clear anyway, really. When I have added fruit like this to a mead (...


3

In first place it's very hard to get a blood-red beer. The beers that are said to be red are actually ruby, copper or reddish brown in color. Just to make it clear because you are probably aware of that. My favorite malt for red color is Roasted Barley (in very small amounts - maximum 2% of your grist). Munich is probably one of the best too, and Vienna ...


3

I don't think you can calculate this number. They report a max extract using a standardized lab test obviously. But then the rest is subject to too many variables for there actually be something to calculate. Its system and brewer dependent on what the ppg will be. I think your calcs are spot on as far as getting in the ball park. Maybe assume a 5-8% ...


3

I say that it's unnecessary - the malt extract does not need to go into the fridge, since it's sterile from the producer. Also nothing can grow in the malt extract due to the high sugar content, so I'd say the chilling and reheating is just creating extra work. Simply leave the malt extract at room temperature and pour into the pot. If you want to decrease ...


3

Because sugar is 100% fermentable, there will be essentially no body or head retention. Flavor would range from non existent to a harsh alcohol flavor. Without additional nutrients, fermentation will be problematic.


3

Sugar doesn't contain the nutrients yeast need to reproduce properly. It's likely that you'd end up with a stuck fermentation, and off-tastes (notably cidery, from acetaldehyde). As Denny mentioned, that would be pretty much the only taste in there, so it would likely be quite unpleasant.


3

With just sugar, you wouldn't be making beer, since malted grain is a key ingredient. It would be closer to mead, and like mead, the resulting drink would have no head since that's created by protein, which there is none in sugar. There would also be no residual sweetness or any other flavoring other than the alcohol, so it would taste pretty bad. You can ...


3

Star-San is the best answer -- BUT: DO NOT use it after, ie: so as to clean and store for later use. Star-San is acidic and prolonged/sustained contact will make your plastic brittle and break (I have broken a siphon tube like this after only a few months of doing this afterbrew sanitizing). Use Star-San ONLY just before use for anything plastic/vinyl (...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible