Hot answers tagged

4

I would certainly make it if I had it around. I would get a fresh pack of dry yeast. It has the shortest shelf life of the stuff you have, and is the cheapest to replace. There's probably enough cells there to bring it back with a starter, but I wouldn't feel bad about throwing away a kit yeast. Steeping grains, like Crystal/Cara grains, are just fine. The ...


3

Sour brewing doesn't mean all grain brewing by any stretch. Sour beers start with wort just like anything other beer; how you get your wort doesn't matter. Of course all-grain affords you more control and options, but that's a statement for all brewing not sour beer specific. Sour beer brewing and LME is perfectly fine. Pick a recipe that seems right for ...


3

'Is it simply a matter of stirring continuously?' Pretty much, especially with DME. Once it's dissolved fully, though, there should be no further need to stir. So really 'continuously-until-it's-dissolved'. I find it helps to add DME slowly while stirring or whisking continuously, until it has all been added, and then continue to stir until visible signs (...


3

I would assume they mean liquid malt extract as the specifically mention dry light malt extract below.


2

Based on Northwestern's website (http://www.northwesternextract.com/brewing/malt/), their Gold LME is equivalent to light LME (not extra light) from other companies. It falls right in between their Extra Light and Amber LMEs. Based on this Home Brew Talk thread (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/what-gold-lme-126714/), the last post explains that Briess also ...


2

(1) Yes, you can use a mix of DME and LME in your recipe, but it will affect your recipe. You would be better off using all Bavarian wheat DME. The classic recipe book, Brewing Classic Styles, calls for an American Wheat Ale, for example, to be made from 100% wheat LME having a color of 4°L on the Lovibond scale. Using less wheat will de-emphasize the "...


2

Boiling extract achieves a few things. Most important it kills many bacteria and wild yeast that might have made it's way into the wort. Even with properly sanitised equipment there is a risk that there is something in the water or even drifting in the air. Also boiling the extract will also make it darker and change the flavour a bit, so when you do this ...


2

You can kick up a fuss you'd be justified as it is not what you ordered. But, I'd just throw in some extra Dark Patent Malt and Roasted Barley, may be an extra .5lb of each to try and pull back the colour. Adding extra Roasted barley may lead to a more harsh bitterness, but adding more patent black should be OK. If you do nothing you should end up with a ...


2

You can use LME (or DME) from any provider, they're all basically the same. There might be slight differences in sugar content, flavor, color, quality, &c., but LME is LME.


2

Couple tips for DME You just want the water warm when adding it. 100°F is fine. What you don't want is boiling or any steam, or it will clump before even touching the water making mixing a pain. Once the "warm" wort is clump free from manual mixing then start your heat. Carmelizing will only happen if you get clumps of DME or LME sitting on the direct ...


1

If you're limited to LME you may want to just use lactic acid to sour a beer. This can be done post fermentation to taste. You can use traditional bacteria with an LME beer but it would need to be inoculated. True all grain sours are a big step in homebrew requiring a mash held at warm temp for several hours or at least a kettle with stable warm temps. ...


1

Along with the stirring it helps to turn off the heat before adding the extracts. Preheating the water helps get extract to dissolve faster. If you are using a gas stove top just turn it off. If you are using an electric stove top move the pot off the element as it will still be hot. Get the water moving and add the extract a little at a time. A good ...


1

I wouldn't dilute the extract, for a couple reasons: First, the extract doesn't need to be sterile when stored, because it contains so little water. Add some water and things will start growing. Second, if your water contains any kind of chlorine, it will probably break down and ruin the flavor of the extract. What you can do is heat the stuff up to make ...


1

You should get the water to at least 160 for a few minutes to pasteurize it. Another reason to heat it up is to help thin out the thick and syrupy LME. Also, if you want to extract any bitterness from the hops you'll have to boil them for at least 15 minutes to isomerize the alpha acids. The more bitterness you want the longer you need to boil, hence Dogfish ...


1

https://byo.com/kolsch-altbier/item/1362-shelf-life-storing-your-ingredients This site has good advice for storing your brewing supplies..


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible