7

A ginger bug is simply a lactic acid culture started from raw ginger root (with skin still on) and sugar mixed together in dechlorinated water. When you "add the ginger bug" to your drink recipe, you're adding the liquid from this culture after straining out the chopped ginger bits. After the ginger bug has been allowed to mature to a slightly fizzy state (...


5

Bacteria like to hang out in soft surfaces like rubber and plastic, which for us usually includes things like buckets, hoses, and o-rings. Also any metal fittings for your valves, etc. Glass bottles have none of these problems. You can safely clean and sanitize your bottles and reuse them for any kind of beer. If you are very concerned, the best way to ...


5

Ginger juice alone does not have enough sugar to be fermentable. However, ginger beer is a popular, slightly alcoholic beverage made from ginger root, sugar, water and citric acid. Take a look at this question and answer.


4

While I am no expert on this topic, I did a little bit of research to help you out. It is generally understood that in winemaking metabisulphite inhibits bacteria and yeast growth, so I would think that this could cause a problem for you. This topic has been discussed on winemakingtalk and there is a consensus near the bottom of the thread where H2O2 (...


3

Wort It will be good, if you will have a good way to stir. In 30 liters I found temperature differences of more than 20°C to be possible, and ones around 5-10°C to be pretty common. So make sure some kind of automatic stir is there, or heat really, really slowly. Safety Be sure to use system that, if probe is short circuited or missing, switches off heating ...


3

The enzymes beta-amylase and alpha-amylase have ideal ranges. Doesn't mean they will not work they just take longer if a little too high or low. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4460087/#!po=49.0826 Basically what it says is that our brewing enzymes will still function until pH induced denaturing, which happens around pH 2.0 Though they lose a ...


3

This previous question may help you a bit: Is brewers' Lactobacillus heterofermentative or homofermentative? This is taken for Wikipedia According to metabolism, Lactobacillus species can be divided into three groups: Obligately homofermentative (Group I) including: L. acidophilus, L. delbrueckii, L. helveticus, L. salivarius Facultatively ...


3

There's a good article about the ginger beer plant (which I think is your ginger bug) on this website. http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2008/07/ginger-beer-plant-101.html.


3

A bit tricky to tell, but it could be early stages of a lactobacillus or pediococcus contamination. The flaky white patches are typical of lactobacillus, while short segments of ropes you see are typical of pediococcus, although I would swing towards lactobacillus on this one. Lactobacillus contamination: Pediococcus contamination: Either way, it's ...


2

Ginger Bugs can provide very sharp amounts of ginger flavor depending on the quality and quantity of ginger used in the ginger bug. It is a fun, easy, inexpensive and surprisingly versatile ferment that I encourage noobs to master first. Then also do the GingerBeerPlant (GBP) grains when you can find a source of GBP. GBP grains are very similar to water ...


2

IMHO mould growth is not often fatal to brewing but you should remove the fungal mycelium, preferably before it spores, with (e.g.) a spoon and continue fermentation. Seems like a lot of air/head space above the brew in the bucket. Maybe worth using a smaller container to assist the build up of CO2 and make the protective "gas blanket" that CO2 provides.


2

Yes. Potassium Metabisulfite works by depleting oxygen to inhibit aerobic growth. It doesn't "kill" yeast or bacteria in the short term. Potassium Metabisulfite can be defeated by adding a lot of oxygen. In my experience shaking or a stirplate alone is not enough. It needs a very good dose of pure oxygen much more than what you would add to beer to get ...


2

Addressing your homefermentative comment, how do you know this Yakult pitch is a single strain of microbes? It could have some other strains to a smaller % and they are giving you your off smell. There isn't much regulation in the purity of yogurt cultures. Its more of a what is the largest population pitched to make the product. It doesn't mean there ...


2

Although I have no experience with Lactobacillus, I think part of the answer is in the Brewer's Notes. Some strains of Lactobacillus work better at much lower temperatures... Lacto pitch rate is important... I believe since this recipe has 2 yeast strains, the pitch rate is more critical than when you have only one. So if you don't have the stir plate, ...


1

If you have a beginning gravity and an end gravity, it's pretty easy to figure an approximate ABV for your beverage. The only way to definitively tell how much alcohol is in a solution is to run it through a Ebulliometer, which is essentially a tiny alcohol still. Sorry, that's the only real ways to do it!


1

This is what is called a "kettle sour", because you're souring it in your boil kettle, then reboiling. This gives pretty precise control over how much you sour it. This IMO, is the main reason for the specifics on the starter. You're leaving it in there for a short period of time, and you need a good yeast count for it to get the job done. The author of ...


1

Although we use acidulated malt kettle sour, we too always get an off putting smell during kettle souring boil does rid most or atleast some of the smell, but fermentation does the best job of getting rid of the smell assuming we have the same nose... Does it smell similar to nuts and old yogurt? If so you have a good start and not to worry it will be fine. ...


1

Have others soured using Yakult? From what I can tell it's a specific strain of Lactobacillus (casei Shirota). Specifically designed as a probiotic to aid digestion. Kinda makes sense it would smell septic. I would say boil it and see how it turns out. I've had many great beers where fermentation smelled terrible.


1

I have made ginger beer from regular old yeast before so there is nothing inherent about ginger that makes it unsuitable for yeast fermentation. Yeast technically speaking is a fungus not bacteria so how things that have anti bacterial qualities interact with fungi I'm not sure.


1

Lactobacillus delbrueckii does very little to effect the appearance of your beer. In terms of flocculation (dropping out of suspension in the beer, leaving a clear appearance), I would compare it to a medium/high flocculation Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strain. With proper aging and use of fining agents if desired, it will not impart a significant haze on ...


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