7

The problem is that the hydrometer is used the amount of sugar in the solution, not the amount of alcohol. So you can measure the original gravity (OG), and the final gravity (FG), but in kombucha the alcohol produced by the fermentation is transformed into acetic and other acids. So you can not measure if there really is alcohol in the kombucha. The only ...


6

I had a pretty decent hard iced tea made by a fellow homebrewer one time. Don't remember his exact recipe, but it consisted of fresh brewed organic black tea, a whole bunch of brown sugar and some yeast nutrient (and yeast, of course!). 1 lb of brown sugar per gallon of tea should yield a brew of about 4.5% ABV. Here is a good list of fermentables you ...


5

You can't ferment straight tea, because the yeast won't have anything to eat. You need to add some kind of fermentable (sugar, honey, etc) and some yeast. You're probably better off taking a recipe for something that's already fermentable (beer, wine, mead) and adding your tea to it for flavor.


5

Fruit fly eggs are yellow 1/2mm long and will generally hatch into larvae in ~30Hours, so if they are still there 2 days later then they are specks of stuff, if the hatch then they are larvae, which will likely fall into the liquid and drown. I hope that helps you. Edit: Oh, also CO2 tend to put the fruit flies to sleep, so if they were to fly into the ...


5

This question kind of brings up some more fundamental questions about fermentation (like whether or not you could even call something kombucha if it's not made with a 'proper' SCOBY, given that a SCOBY could just be said to be 'some collection of microbes that, together, produces kombucha'). It's a bit of a chicken-and-egg situation. For most cultures (...


4

"Primary fermentation" with SCOBY is really about inoculating the brew. Three days should be enough after which one can remove the SCOBY (kombucha "mother") and use it elsewhere. How long to leave fermenting in the secondary stage is really a question of how much sugar/nutrient has been added, what the ambient temperature is and how sweet/sour one likes one'...


4

My ginger beer SCOBY has grown in a jar for over 9 years. If kept hydrated and fed (with ginger and sugar and occasional fresh lemon juice) it seems to keep well enough. If I do not produce/bottle ginger beer for a time then I rinse the SCOBY monthly (or so) and replace the old water which removes any build up of by-products. I still use the orginal "plant" ...


3

My recipe 1 cup sugar (5.7 oz) 6 liters water (1.58 gal) 1/4 cup loose black tea I've never measured the OG or the FG, but the recipe calculates to OG 1.014. The reason why I've never measured the FG is because I just tasted it every so often, and pull it off the SCOBY when it tastes right to me. There is no reason to having booch that's too sweet or too ...


3

Suggested OGs are around 1020-1030 from a number of forums, but people are making big 1090 OGs. Regarding FG I recall they end quiet dry as there is often only simple sugars and very little tri-saccharides or longer polysaccharides. so I would expect around 997-1004. What little I can find on the google seems to agree, I have a book at home I will dig it ...


3

Don't add anything with oils (eg. herbs, herbal and fruit teas) to your initial brew. The flavours will stay in your scoby and the oils will go rancid and impair future brews. Add it to your bottles for the secondary ferment and just remove or sieve before serving.


3

You can always measure the specific gravity of any liquid with a hydrometer, but unless you know the starting gravity (as in, pre-fermentation), the reading won't actually tell you much. This on top of the fact that the byproducts of a mixed fermentation (alcohol, acetic or lactic acid, &c) will all have different densities makes a hydrometer reading ...


3

Cold alone is not really an option, since yeast will not die but become dormant, and could be reactivated after heating a little. There are a few ways to acheive this: Pasteurization This will kill the yeast, but heating could affect the final product in some cases. Filtration A very fine filter can remove yeast particles. Sweeteners/Less sugar Adding ...


2

Basically, nothing short of a scoby being fuzzy, hairy, bright blue or green, smelling like a diaper pail or biting you is all ok! Mold is pretty much the only absolute no-no. If it isn't moldy and you are happy with the smell (should be slightly vinegary) just taste it. You'll know if it's ok or not by whether you spit it out or not :).


2

If you are willing to drink a lot of beer and recycle the bottles, then Newcastle Brown Ale comes in clear cap-able bottles. Thats where my clear bottles come from. Enjoy!


2

Basically, you need something with sugar for the yeast to eat to ferment anything. If you're trying to make Kombucha, you just need sweet tea and a starter SCOBY. Here is a good how-to A scoby is a Symbiotic Colony Of Bacteria and Yeast (SCOBY). The yeast eat the sugar, making alcohol, and the bacteria eat the alcohol to make a vinegary tasting beverage. ...


2

Well in your specific kombucha I won’t be able to tell you but I can give you some math that should help you figure it out and should be able to be used by any brewer to figure out the caloric effect of fermentation on your brews. So just to hit you with the math right now and ill break it down later the equation to figure out the change in calories caused ...


2

We use flavoring ingredients like herbs and berries during the initial steep. We don't add anything after the fermentation. We use mint in one of our recipes, and it works well. The advice I would give you is that some ingredients can hamper bacterial growth (for example, we've found that ginger can slow down the fermentation a bit, and rosemary as well) and ...


2

During secondary fermentation (bottling stage, aka 2F) of kombucha brewing, there is a correlation between sugar as an input and carbonation as an output. If you increase the sugar in the 2F ingredients, carbonation will increase. If you're getting too much carbonation during 2F, you can do one or both of the following. Burp the bottles throughout the 2F ...


2

This site recommends you keep culturing for less than 6 weeks. For longer, they recommend two options. "Feeding" the scoby every 4-6 weeks, where "feeding" consists of draining off the existing solution and adding fresh, sweetened tea. That site also recommends adding sugar over nothing. Dehydrate the scoby (see the link) However, neither option claims to ...


2

Yes, it will probably be related to the large Scoby. Either trim the scoby, or use a larger container. That seems a very short ferment too though. What size is your scoby, and what volume of tea are you using?


2

If you want to play it safe, over-pitch (sorta) by pitching a regular amount of yeast to ferment the beer, and as a secondary fermentation pour in a bottle of your favorite basic kombucha with no flavor additions after the first fermentation has completed. The hops may slow the souring, but in reality, that's probably a good thing unless you're aiming for a ...


2

Not sure it's possible. SCOBY does what she wants. She likes to make floating pancakes. The best you might hope for is a high fill with a super narrow neck to keep the SCOBY as small as possible.


2

Kombucha contains a variety of micro-organisms, the most important ones of which are brewing yeast (Saccharomyces Cerevisae) and Acetobacter. The S. Cereviseae converts sugar into alcohol, after which the Acetobacter combines the alcohol with oxygen into acetic acid (vinegar). If both are in good shape and present in the proper quantities, and your Kombucha ...


1

More time is fine. Due to growth rates, if you use only 1 pack then you will need approximatley 2.5 times as long in the fermnter.


1

In my personal experience, cold crashing does help to clear the booch a bit. I'm a homebrewer who has started to brew kombucha. I've only got 4 kombucha brews under my belt and I've been kegging since my 2nd batch. After a day our 2 in the keg (and a cloudy pour or 2) the kombucha is very clear and has a hint of color from the fruit used. This is also ...


1

Some info about Cold Crashing. Cold crashing will definitely help that problem of cloudiness and yeast sediments on the bottom. I recommend 10 days at as close to 0 celsius as you can. e.g. 1 degree celsius. Cold crashing will make most of the yeast flocculate (clump together and fall to the bottom.) and they will hibernate in the cold. However, cold ...


1

When I grew Kombucha it looked quite like the pictures supplied. Kopmbucha is a SCOBY that does not conform to any one typical shape or colour pattern. I have often heard the growing SCOBY compared to an exotic "jelly fish". I have also heard it said that different colours can develop with different fermentation basis. Some of the colours are definitely pH ...


1

Probably caused by the larger SCOBY, next time round trim down the SCOBY and try again. If it smells OK and tastes OK then you are most likely fine, if it has sulfur notes or anything else unpleasant, then ditch it and start again with a trimmed down SCOBY.


1

Matter cannot be created nor destroyed So really the only calorie loss during fermentation is that in which the yeast burn and what is concentrated from the loss of c02 escaping. Ethanol has 6.9 calories per gram Sugar has 4 calories per gram Here is a calculator http://realbeer.com/spencer/attenuation.html#calories If you play with the numbers for ...


1

What you're describing is a "gusher infection", wild yeast that can consume normally unfermentable sugars like dextrins. Usually leaves a beverage with little body and other issues. In beer after the cap pops a gusher will just usually slowly volcano, taking most the beer with it as foam. Some can over carb so much to vacate the bottle almost ...


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