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10

According to Brewkaiser, the ideal boil pH (room temp sample pre boil) should be around 5.2-5.4. Much lower than that, and you'll reduce hop utilitilization, but much higher and the hop utiliziation increases, but the bitterness is harsher. (The same process that causes tannin extraction at higher pH in the mash is at play in the boil also.) A higher pH in ...


9

The solution I use is to mark my spoon with permanent marker. I have marks for each half gallon. Works really well without messing with the kettle itself. This obviously is kettle specific, so if you are using multiple kettles you can have markings of different color to differentiate the different markings per kettle.


6

This is one of those things that you're going to have to decide for yourself because there is no simple consensus. Environmental lead is bad. There's no question about that. Increasingly, there's research to suggest that even low levels of lead are harmful (NIH Study). It's not just full-blown poisoning that you want to watch out for, but more subtle ...


4

Brass is fine as long as you clean it properly. John Palmer details what that means in one of the appendices of How to Brew, which is available online here http://www.howtobrew.com/appendices/appendixB.html The especially important part: The brass will turn a buttery yellow color as it is cleaned. If the solution starts to turn green and the brass ...


4

If you're using a pre-hopped extract, no boil brewing is possible. All extracts have already been boiled by the manufacturer anyways; with extracts, the main purpose behind boiling is you need the higher temperatures to cause isomerization of the hop acids so the hop bitterness gets into the beer. Secondary reasons for boiling extracts are additional protein ...


4

Based on my own experience, an 8 gal. kettle will barely work for a 5 gal. batch. Even at that, you might have to boil a concentrated wort and add top up water after the boil. Remember that in addition to accounting for trub and evaporation, you also need some headroom in there to start with. I wouldn't recommend anything less than 15 gal. for a 10 gal. ...


3

If you have this keg style 5, 7.75, 10 are marked by the bottom rib, middle weld, and top rib Paddle / spoon marks on a keggle rely on hitting that small flat spot in the bottom. I've seen people etch the inside with DIY etching made from a 12v battery charger. There is a trick to the masking using stickers and nail polish. Worth a Google. This is a pot ...


3

For a ten gallon batch, you'll probably want to have about 11 gallons of wort at the end of the boil to account for kettle losses (dead space, break material, hops). If you figure you'll boil off roughly a gallon per hour and you might want to be able to do a 90 minute boil sometimes, your kettle will need to hold an additional 1.5 gallons. That puts you at ...


3

Reapply Teflon tape. As counterintuitive as it sounds, check to make sure the bulkhead isn't overtightened; it can cause gaskets to leak.


3

It's a can of metal. If you don't feel you can get the surface clean after the fry (perhaps because of carbonization of organic matter stuck to the surface), then that will be a problem. If you can, then it's a clean surface you will have no problems brewing with in the future. I'd say: roast away! If there's a problem, lobby to get your family to replace ...


3

The problem with sight gauges with pre-defined volume labels is that the manufacturer is not able to determine what size kettle you are attaching it to, and even if you are an 1/4 of an inch off, you could possibly be a 1/4 - 1/2 gallon off the mark (depending on how wide the kettle is). I guarantee the 5-gallon mark on my Blichmann boil kettle is not going ...


3

I have to agree with dax, it really depends what you are making. If you are in fact making a cider you might not want to boil it to utilise the wild yeast that is present on the peel of the fruit. If you are reading a recipe that is specifically mentioning your malt extract (or brewing kit) and it mentions that you need to boil it, then it probably means ...


3

I use an aluminum yardstick, which let's you do pretty accurate measurements on multiple pots/kettles, without needing to use a marker on anything (I've had problems with marker wearing off and worry about toxicity of the ink). Put a gallon of water in your pot, measure how high it is, and write it down somewhere. Then you'll always be able calculate what ...


3

Just treat it like any other mash tun. Before you pull that thing out of the kettle start drawing off wort through the valve at the base (at least it looks like a valve in the picture). Collect it in a pitcher that you can easily pour from. Then slowly pour in back in at the top of the cylinder. Do this repeatedly until you think the wort looks clear ...


3

The good pots I've seen have a ferrious plate integrated into the base, with food grade stainless for food contact areas. I was looking at 20 liter+ pots which are about $500 us. For commercial pots. However the stove top for that large a pot is about $5,000. So I abandoned the search there.


2

I am a single burner all grain brewer so I figured I would share my process. Right now I have a 8.5g polarware kettle w/ thermometer and ball valve, a 4g pot for an HLT and a 10g igloo mash tun. My typical setup is heat the mash water in my polarware kettle, and then mash in to the cooler. Then, depending on how much sparge water (I batch sparge) I either ...


2

The main thing you need to consider is the boil-kettle in terms of size, because of boil off. For example, you want a 9 or 10+ gallon boil kettle for 5 gallon all-grain batches if you're doing a full boil, because you will have boil-off and generally want to start with around 7 gallons of water, and will want some room in the pot above the water line. 7 ...


2

Two ideas for you, with the caveat that I have no direct experience with pumps + BIAB, I'm just spitballing here. A false bottom will keep your bag off the kettle floor and away from the outlet. I couldn't easily see if MoreBeer makes a false bottom to fit that particular kettle, but there's probably a generic product that will fit reasonably well. A ...


2

I have aluminum HLT and BK and used a dremel to make a small mark at each gallon level. I marked with a china marker when the water was in there (adding one gallon at a time), and after I dried it out, I used the dremel. I marked in 3 columns, 120 degrees apart, so I'd be able to see at least one measurement no matter which side I was standing on. Also, I ...


2

This really depends what you're making - if you're making mead or cider, you don't have to boil anything (and I would argue you shouldn't although that's up for debate with some). Some kits don't need to be boiled as per their instructions - and this is probably what you have. You can mix the tin of goo with some hot water directly in your fermenter and go ...


2

Well, it depends on the losses you assume along the way. For 5 gallons, if you assume a trub loss of 0.5 gallons, and evaporation loss of 1.0 gallon, then you would need 6.5 gallons of wort to get 5 gallons into a fermenter. If you follow the oft-quoted rule of thumb that you want minimum headspace in your kettle equal to one-third of your boil volume, that ...


2

I usually use teflon tape to keep these from leaking. Another possibility is the gasket (sometimes a silicone o-ring), which may not be sitting flush against the kettle. This may need changing.


2

Ideally you want your thermometer in the midline of your average batch. In a keggle you want it slightly below that first rib if you ever do 5gal batches. Biggest thing is to make sure it doesn't get in the way of your immersion chiller if you use one. They don't have much use on a boil kettle other than for cool down, hops rests, maybe estimating when ...


2

If you are too close to the bottom you'll pick up more heat from the heat source itself (burner or element if electric) than as a measurement of the wort. You want to be about 1/2 or a third of the way up from the bottom to somewhat get away from that effect. The longer the probe is helps with that issue too, however too long of a probe will interfere with ...


1

Not to go off in another direction, but EZ could you elaborate on your statement that a cooler tun will achieve better results. I brew in a 70 quart crawfish pot with basket. Drop all the grains in a mesh bag and drop it in the correct temp water. Check temp every 15 minutes, depending on outside temperature may relight burner once during the process. ...


1

A cooler mash tun will get you better results. Thier only limitation is step mashes require decoction or mash infusion. Going BIAB would be a downgrade imo. Keggles have their own pros an cons. They lack insulation and need wrapped during rest. With a proper false bottom or some care with BIAB, you can apply flame for step mashes. With only a single ...


1

The kettle you linked to has has two drilled holes into which are fitted weld-less bulkheads. The bottom one has a ball valve attached to it, allowing you to empty the kettle from there (instead of picking up the whole thing and pouring, or siphoning the liquid out). The top is plugged but would usually hold a thermometer. The benefits of add-ons depend ...


1

I recently installed a weldless blichmann Brewmometer and reading the specifications for it, it recommended to install it at least 6" of the bottom. This recommended minimum height was not in order for the temperature-probe to always be in the center, or even immersed in the liquid at all times, but to prevent the heat from the stove/cooker "rolling" over ...


1

if you are talking about beer, I would say that it isn't worth doing unless the end product is going to be good, and you will likely be disappointed by a hopped extract kit. if you are doing this as sort of an experiment rather than to have loads of great beer, then there is no harm in trying... but don't think that you are bad at brewing because the sauce ...


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