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15

First of all, there is no rule about time for beers. The beer makes its own schedule. In terms of aging, there are no rules either. The beer is ready when it tastes ready to you. I prefer IPAs without a lot of age on them so that the hop character remains fresh. But you should try one occasionally and see what you think.


11

The main difference is the yeast, Ale is brewed with a top fermenting yeast s.cerevisiae[1] whereas Lager is brewed with a bottom fermenting yeast s.pastorianus[2]. From this comes the fermentation temperature, ales are fermented at higher temperatures(14-20 C) than lager(10-12 C). A lager you would also allow to warm towards the end of the primary ...


11

Thick mouthfeel and body can come from a few sources and even more methods to manipulate them. Most how to brew books have an entire section dedicated to the topic. But here's some bullet points to piont you in the right direction for further reading. Thicker body is from protients, unfermentables and starch. Protiens: These are manipulated with the grain ...


10

Most Ales do well at 68°F primary, to limit phenols and undesirable esters made by yeast during growth phase. Secondary can go up to the higher end of recommended temp of a strain since there isn't much left for yeast to feed on and it's at this time the yeast consume those byproducts made in primary. So the higher temp encourages yeast metabolism. There ...


9

The hop pellets are not supposed to dissolve into your wort. Rather, the boiling isomerizes the alpha acids in the hops (and the isomerized alpha acids will dissolve into the wort), giving the wort its intended bitterness. However, it is totally normal to get an "oil slick", film or foam of hops on top of the boiling wort. Hops have three purposes: ...


7

Referring to the BJCP Style Guidelines, the following is true: English Pale Ales (ESBs): 25-50 IBUs American Pale Ales: 20-40 IBUs IPAs: 40-60 IBUs for English, 40-70 IBUs for American, 60-120 IBUs for Imperial IPAs Based on this, the answer to your question should be in the 40+ IBU range to differentiate bitterness between pale ales and IPAs. Bear in ...


7

I think the primary factor would be how much you're dry-hopping with. More hops means more of the volatile aromatic compounds that produce those aromas. Most of the recipes I've seen call for somewhere from 1 to 4 ounces of hops in the fermenter but I've heard of people using as many as 10+ ounces for dry-hopping. I'm not sure how that matches up with what ...


7

In addition to the other answers which I agree with. Late boil additions are very important too at last 1-5 minutes or whirlpool. These add a "deep" aroma for lack of a better term. They seem to bond to the wort at this temp and hang on through fermentation. Dry hopping in early fermentation while does add aroma and flavor tends to have much of it blown ...


7

What they're referring to is a process called "dry hopping", which is used to promote hop aroma and flavor in the beer. It's very common and has been in use for hundreds of years. You don't need to worry about contamination from the hops for several reasons...first, hops were originally used for their antibacterial properties. Second, after fermentation ...


6

It's not contradictory so much as it's all valid. :) To answer the titular question: yes, you can dry-hop in primary. Long-term aging is really the only reason to rack to secondary. Dry-hopping, fruit additions, &c. can all happen in primary just fine. Anything that happens w/in 6 months can happen in one vessel (primary) or two (primary and secondary).


6

In my opinion a "secondary" should be viewed as a tool. A potentially useful tool, but best used by someone who really has a grip of their brewing process and using it for a very specific purpose. I agree with Palmer, dont chase what the big brewers do, they have different issues then homebrewers. I would definitely suggest dry hopping in your primary vessel ...


6

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time. You should not worry as you are not setting it down for it to pick up bacterial contamination. Yes there is a tiny ...


6

In addition to Mr_Roads answer. Lager yeast is unique from ale yeast in that it can breakdown and use melibiose, which is a sugar not fermentable by ale yeasts. This is one reason lagers are generally "cleaner" in mouth feel and residual sweetness over ales with the same recipe.


5

It was a lucky guess. There is nothing in that grist bill specific to an IPA. AAMOF, it's NOT an IPA! The OG is too low, for one thing. The recipe even calls itself a pale ale, not an IPA. As to what makes an IPA an IPA, the best ROT is the BU:GU ratio. An IPA will usually be in the 1.060-1.075 OG range and have at least a 1:1 BU:GU ratio.


5

The Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) makes an attempt to describe styles such as this. One such style is IPA (grouped into 3 subcategories: English IPA, American IPA, and Imperial IPA). Have a look: http://www.bjcp.org/2008styles/style14.php You're right that the hop character defines the IPA style. However, a traditional IPA has some restrictions on ...


5

I don't have a lot of experience with recipe design, but I can provide some links. Check out this excellent 2010 article from Brew Your Own magazine on Black IPAs. It says that the Great American Beer Festival adopted that style as "American-Style India Black Ale", and the characteristics are: Color = 25+ SRM Original Gravity = 1.056–1.075 Final ...


5

I cold crash (and fine with gelatin) at 30F for two or three days before kegging. I have found that 30F for two days clears my beer better than weeks at 38F in my refrigerator. If you plan to bottle the beer, you might fear that you'll drop too much yeast out, leaving you with too little yeast to carbonate the beer. That isn't a concern. Plenty of beer has ...


5

There isn't an ideal temp for any of this. There is a recommended range offered by the manufacturer to help guide the end user towards a higher degree of success that something will ferment. As for US-05 yeast, I've heard of people using it at weird temps outside the "recommended" range and having success. But success for them may be different than ...


5

From my experience thesquaregroot got it mostly rigtht - fresh hops and sufficient quantity. There is one more really important factor. As far as my experiments go, 4 days before adding hops and bottling are optimal. Any more or less time means less aroma - it either didn't dissolve in your beer yet, or already started to evaporate. And never, ever dry-hop ...


5

Simply put, there are two overarching umbrellas in beer... ales and lagers. An IPA is an ale. GENERALLY speaking all beers fit under one of these two umbrellas. Once under one of these umbrellas the main difference is brewing technique. Even if you use the exact same ingredients and technique between a beer with ale yeast and the other with lager yeast, one ...


5

Good luck with starting a brewery! A two week fermentation time is a bit long for a commercial brewery, I believe. You can probably shave a few days to a week depending on your gravity, yeast, and pitch rate. Your cold crashing and carbonation time is going to depend on your equipment. How fast can your equipment chill the volume of beer you will be ...


5

Bottle conditioning, not to be confused with bottle aging, is only for natural carbonation. You want to use a monosaccharide sugar like powdered corn sugar so it's easily and completely consumed by the yeast. Using DME, honey or anything more complex will leave unfermentable sugars and other compounds in the beer, resulting in flavor and mouthfeel changes....


5

Wait!!! Does the beer taste good? If so, just leave it, it wont be as bitter as the recipe sure, but good beer is good beer. It's probably OK. Hop additions are numbered by the amount of boil time in minutes. So a 60 minute addition boils for 60 minutes, and a 0 minute (or "flameout") is added at the end of the boil. So given you reversed your hop ...


4

You don't need a starter since you're pitching to 1/4 batch size that a whitelabs vial is good for. Normally you'd use 2-4 vials for a 20 liter batch, depending upon gravity, so that's equivalent to 1/2 to 1 a vial for a 5 liter batch. For the detailed figures, see Always making a starter vs. following package description. One way to know the OG prior to ...


4

The key piece that's missing here is extraction efficiency - how much sugar you can get out of the grains. In the calculator, it's set at 80%, but it's doubtful you got that just from steeping and lautering in a pot. You typically need continual recirculation to get 80%+. With my old equipment (a large cooler with a hand-made series of pipes with slits.) I ...


4

The earlier in the process you add it, the more flavor you'll lose. The aroma will be boiled off or driven off by CO2 during fermentation. Boiling might extract flavor, but I'm guessing. no idea Add both


4

Your brew will definite taste salty with that quantity of minerals added. I would use a third of that amount. 150ppm calcium and 250ppm sulphates is really the upper limit of what you can comfortably use in the beer, and you will still taste a little salt up front, but often it goes with the style. Here are some guidelines from the HBT wiki, Calcium: ...


4

I agree with the advice given in the other answer that your own judgement tells you when the beer is ready. However it's still possible to give an estimate: I'd say 5 weeks from brewday for low alcohol, under 4%, 7 weeks for medium - 4-6.5% For big beers, you'll need to see how the beer cleans up. As others have said with an IPA, on the one hand you want to ...


4

While some claim that the addition of hops to their beer have contributed to contamination, it is quite rare considering how hops are anti-microbial in nature. While not having any way of confirming it, I would suspect contamination on those situations occurred due to some other unsanitary practice (didn't sanitize the bag, weights, or it was already ...


4

Hey experimenting is half the fun of brewing! If you keep good notes on recipes and final product you can really start to understand what works together and produce better and better beer. Without knowing what your grain bill I would say this looks a little aggressive. As a reference, let's say you were shooting for a 1.065 o.g. (6.5% ish) your current hop ...


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