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7

Referring to the BJCP Style Guidelines, the following is true: English Pale Ales (ESBs): 25-50 IBUs American Pale Ales: 20-40 IBUs IPAs: 40-60 IBUs for English, 40-70 IBUs for American, 60-120 IBUs for Imperial IPAs Based on this, the answer to your question should be in the 40+ IBU range to differentiate bitterness between pale ales and IPAs. Bear in ...


4

The most important number when trying to balance bitterness in a beer is the ratio of international bittering units to starting gravity. This is often expressed as BU:GU (bittering units to gravity units). For reference, this posting has a more detailed explanation and some example BU:GU numbers for popular styles. Some Googling will get you some BU:GU ...


3

Bitterness in a big stout is more than just the IBUs from hops. There is going to be a contribution of perceived bitterness from the roasted malts as well. Sometimes hopping a big roasty beer to a certain IBU value will result in a beer that is too bitter because the IBU calculation doesn't account for that roast malt contribution. This phenomenon is ...


3

In your position, I'd just brew it, and see how you like the outcome. Many factors affect perception of bitterness - it's far from an exact science. For instance, if the recipe has been stored for any length of time at room temperature, the hop alpha acids in some hop varieties will have deteriorated up to 50% in 6 months. But let's look at the theory all ...


3

OG should be 1.073, 75 IBU, FG somewhere around 1.013. Maybe NB uses a different efficiency to calculate things. I gave them my numbers.


2

If the store told you 34, that's what it is. IBU are based primarily on boil gravity, so if you do a partial boil you will end up with a different figure than if you do a full boil. That could very easily account for some of the differences you see. But people other than those who made the kit are simply calculating their own numbers, through a variety of ...


2

Liquid extract has about 36 ppg or points/pound/gal. That means that one lb. of LME in one gal. of water gives you an OG of 1.036. You have 5 kg or about 11 lb. Multiply that by 36 and you have a total of 396 gravity points. Divide that 5.5 (gal., roughly 23 L) and you get 72, so your OG would be 1.072. Because you're doing a concentrated boil, your hop ...


2

One way to evaluate beer bitterness is through the IBU/OG ratio. In your case that would be 151/63=2.396. Now this is hugely bitter! I don't know which style of beer you are trying to brew, but to take some guidelines, the Imperial IPA style (taken as an example of extreme bitterness) should have the following parameters: OG: 1.070-1.090 IBU: 60-120. This ...


2

This is a good question, and I've talked to a few people that agree. I think it's just the nature of the recipe definition/creation process (especially historically): we control most directly the OG, not the FG, even if we're able to anticipate/estimate it. But, yes, we're really trying to control the bitterness:sweetness ratio in the consumed beer, and FG ...


2

There's plenty of commercial beers that exceed 100 IBUs, some go to absurd levels. A lot of my favorite DIPA's have over 100 (Stone's Ruination being the first that comes to mind). I've had the IBU debate with others who have made the claim of the human threshold on hops. No one has been able to cite a factual source on whether or not such a theory is at ...


2

To expand on my comment above: For most homebrewers, unless you're willing to drop some serious money on lab equipment, your measurements will be mostly limited to weights, volumes and specific gravity (and pressure, if kegging). Most of the numbers you'll be dealing with outside these things will involve calculations based on a best-fit equations for most ...


2

When making late hop additions your times need to include all the time isomerization can occur for IBU calculations. Basically whenever the wort is above 175°F. Any addition of 45 minutes or less need to consider chill time, anything above 45 minutes is considered fully isomerized and wouldn't be effected by more time in hot wort. This is where good ...


2

On the Experimental Brewing podcast, we did a test to see how close the IBUs you actually get are to what software predicts (hint:off by as much as +/- 40%). https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/episode-32-ibu-lie As part of it, we interviewed Glenn Tinseth. We were shocked to have him tell us that he never tested pellets, and if you use pellets and ...


1

Might be possible, if you are brewing two batches, one just after another. If you will try to store wet hops, you are giving mold time to grow. Isomerisation continues to occur when hops are hot, so no way to dry them without loses. So then there is freezing, but that's troublesome. If done fresh, from one brew to another directly, would work, but you ...


1

In the fermentables section, if you "Add Custom" you can indicate that a fermentable (extract) addition is a "Late Addition", but it does not seem to specify exactly when/how late that addition is; I imagine it means "near flameout". As such, it looks like it will account for bitterness changes. You should probably inquire with the Brewers Friend authors/...


1

The alpha acids that give the bitterness from hops reach saturation somewhere around 90 IBUs. Since your hops were not exposed to the whole volume of beer (presumably they were filtered out at the of the boil) you aren't getting the full impact from them. It is reasonable to say that the IPA is actually 90 IBUs (saturation is around 90mg/L). Then divide by ...


1

There are a bunch of factors to consider here. To name a few: As you mention, zero to very little gravity will tend to increase the utilization rate as there will be less competitive inhibition from wort sugars. Boiling in water alone will mean a higher pH (as malt phosphates, even in extract brewing, would normally react with hardness in/added to the water ...


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