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What is the IBU cutoff between a Pale Ale and an IPA?

Referring to the BJCP Style Guidelines, the following is true: English Pale Ales (ESBs): 25-50 IBUs American Pale Ales: 20-40 IBUs IPAs: 40-60 IBUs for English, 40-70 IBUs for American, 60-120 IBUs ...
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2 votes
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My ingredient quantities seem a bit off

Liquid extract has about 36 ppg or points/pound/gal. That means that one lb. of LME in one gal. of water gives you an OG of 1.036. You have 5 kg or about 11 lb. Multiply that by 36 and you have a ...
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2 votes

My ingredient quantities seem a bit off

One way to evaluate beer bitterness is through the IBU/OG ratio. In your case that would be 151/63=2.396. Now this is hugely bitter! I don't know which style of beer you are trying to brew, but to ...
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  • 135
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Why is IBU/GU a good measure?

This is a good question, and I've talked to a few people that agree. I think it's just the nature of the recipe definition/creation process (especially historically): we control most directly the OG, ...
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2 votes
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IBU above 100... how bad is that?

There's plenty of commercial beers that exceed 100 IBUs, some go to absurd levels. A lot of my favorite DIPA's have over 100 (Stone's Ruination being the first that comes to mind). I've had the IBU ...
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2 votes
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How to get a feel for the numbers involved in brewing

To expand on my comment above: For most homebrewers, unless you're willing to drop some serious money on lab equipment, your measurements will be mostly limited to weights, volumes and specific ...
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2 votes
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What is the "gravity correction factor" for IBU formulation and why do we apply it at 1.050?

I consulted "Designing Great Beers", and indeed, it shows the same formula, without really explaining why the gravity correction factor is applied, only that it needs to be applied, with ...
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  • 3,565
2 votes

Might have over-bittered

When making late hop additions your times need to include all the time isomerization can occur for IBU calculations. Basically whenever the wort is above 175°F. Any addition of 45 minutes or less need ...
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2 votes

Correction of Tinseth's for pellets vs cones

On the Experimental Brewing podcast, we did a test to see how close the IBUs you actually get are to what software predicts (hint:off by as much as +/- 40%). https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/...
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1 vote
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Hop alpha acid, iso-alpha acid and resin contributions to the boil, by example

The hops' lupulin glands do not only produce alpha-acids. They produce also other volatile substances (oils, resins) which give flavor and aroma to beer. And the hops also contain tannins which also ...
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  • 3,565
1 vote
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Re-using aroma hops (whole)

Might be possible, if you are brewing two batches, one just after another. If you will try to store wet hops, you are giving mold time to grow. Isomerisation continues to occur when hops are hot, so ...
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1 vote
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A question on the Brewers' Friend Calculator

In the fermentables section, if you "Add Custom" you can indicate that a fermentable (extract) addition is a "Late Addition", but it does not seem to specify exactly when/how late that addition is; I ...
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IBU calculation for blended worts / braggott

The alpha acids that give the bitterness from hops reach saturation somewhere around 90 IBUs. Since your hops were not exposed to the whole volume of beer (presumably they were filtered out at the of ...
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1 vote
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Effect on a low gravity boil size on IBUs in the final batch

There are a bunch of factors to consider here. To name a few: As you mention, zero to very little gravity will tend to increase the utilization rate as there will be less competitive inhibition from ...
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