9

It might be Brix or Plato, which are basically the same. To test, mix up a 10% solution of sugar: 10 grams sugar in 90 grams water. If the scale is Brix, your solution should read 10 at the calibration temperature. If the units are gravity points, it will read 40.


6

Specific gravity measures density, which is mass/volume. If you measured the total mass of your system (3000g + 300g) you would have gotten 3300 grams, but the volume is not 3000 ml because you added the DME and it increases the volume of the solution. If the volume increased by 174 ml you would get 3300/3174 = 1.040 for the density. In other words, the ...


6

They are both very accurate when used correctly. It's really best to use both Refractometer is only accurate for OG readings. Benefit is a few drops for sample instead of 100-200ml. This is very useful when doing several samples trying to hit an OG in the mash/boil process. You still need your hydrometer for fermentation gravity readings and FG. Though ...


5

The biggest issue in doing that is that krausen will get stuck to both your hydrometer and your carboy walls. Even if you wait for the krausen to die off before dumping your hydrometer in, you will still have a bit of a hard time reading it through the krausened carboy walls... But hey, go ahead and try! That is the essence of homebrewing.


5

For the benefit you'd gain from leaving your hydro in there (maybe saving some volume as you won't take samples) I think it wouldn't really be worth your time as I imagine it would be pretty difficult to read without having to clean it off. Also having to open up your fermentor each time to take a reading exposes the wort to possible infection. I usually ...


5

It is called a 'wine thief'. This should be readily available in any homebrew shop. Possibly in several sizes and qualities even.


4

Here's a different approach to answering your question. Another completely valid, and backwards way of asking your question would be to ask: "How did people know that a hydrometer was an indicator of the beer being done?" The hydrometer really doesn't tell you that your beer is "done". What it tells you is that the sugars have been converted by yeast into ...


4

If it was an extract batch, it's easier to calculate the OG than to measure it. If it was all grain and you know your efficiency, we can calculate it pretty closely from the recipe.


4

I haven't used a hydrometer in years. I think they are worthless and you waste a fair amount of beer using one. You can do a very close estimate of your alcohol content by just using only a refractometer. I used a similar formula when making wine and remembered it for using it with beer too. I won't post the formula here (it's at this website). I never ...


3

Quick but not very helpful answer, I am pretty sure there is some sort of equation that can be used for this I am not sure where I have seen it. I am going to do some digging through some book and the interwebs for you and will update here if/when I find it. Found it, it assumes T is in C. SG(true) = SG(indicated) x [ 1.0 - 0.00025[ T(actual) - T(...


3

The Beerbug is simple on how it gets its SG readings. It uses a weighted buoy, or other contraption that sinks in the wort. then it reads how much it weighs, the lighter it is the thicker the wort. heavier it weighs, thinner or lower gravity of the wort...... If you look at these links, beerbug review 1 and 2 you can plainly see the weighted buoy ...


3

You can always measure the specific gravity of any liquid with a hydrometer, but unless you know the starting gravity (as in, pre-fermentation), the reading won't actually tell you much. This on top of the fact that the byproducts of a mixed fermentation (alcohol, acetic or lactic acid, &c) will all have different densities makes a hydrometer reading ...


3

Refractometer that others mentioned here are very easy to use. Since there are many correction calculators available online, the error of reading won't be terrible. Seems that no one suggested the use of pycnometer. I believe it is most precise "tool" for estimating gravity. The way it works is similar to what @mboren described.


3

Even with champagne yeast, fermentation shouldn't take more than a couple of days to complete fully. At the eighteen day mark, what you're seeing is degassing of the cider, where residual CO2 from the fermentation is escaping the liquid, not fermentation. At this point, your cider has complete fermentation, and should be aged as necessary before being ...


3

Which of these two tools is more accurate/precise in taking gravity measurements? Hydrometer. In my experiance. It could be my cheap refractometer but i've noticed some inaccurate readings and I therefore don't trust it completely. I use the refractometer during the boil and fermentation just to get a general idea, but always a final reading with a ...


3

you can predict ABV by using the yield calculation, Safcider gives 1% of ABV for 16.3g/l 1049 ~ 135 g/l therefore 135/16.3 => 8.2% ABV Or you can get more complex by looking through these equations, but that is overkill for a quick homebrew, unless like me you are a bit of a science/maths geek: http://realbeer.com/spencer/attenuation.html


2

As well as hydrometers, carbonating and hopping beer is also a fairly recent trend in brewing, so a long time ago, the wort was brewed (by steeping grain and boiling, no hops), put into a barrel and then stirred with a big stock of wood that provided the yeast. The beer didn't have anything like the quality we expect today, so it was simply deemed ready ...


2

My best guess is that the scale that goes to 26 is degrees Brix, and that one marked in % is potential alcohol. You can test the first guess by making a solution of 10% table sugar. Add 10g of sugar to 90g of water and mix well. The Brix scale should read 10.


2

The scale is sometimes called "Gravity Points" - it's the Specific Gravity value (1.xxx) without the "1." prefix. So, 1.010 is 10, 1.020 is 20,...1.100 is 100 and so on.


2

As others have suggested, a refractometer is probably the way to go. However, if you've just broken a hydrometer and want to get your SG right now, you should be able to use a scale. I haven't tried this myself, so I don't know for sure, but I suspect that the average kitchen scale will yield results that are less precise than a hydrometer. Given the mass, ...


2

The hydrometer is known to have been invented by the late 4th century or early 5th century, and to have been used for brewing no later than 1770. Source: wikipedia. In most cases, we determine whether a beer is "done" by taste, not measurements. We use a hydrometer mostly to determine when it is OK to package a beer, and for our amusement to determine its ...


2

I dropped mine into the glass carboy and left it in (wasn't an easy way to get it out). It was a bit difficult to read but I managed. Removed it carefully after bottling. No disasters.


2

Conversion from Brix to SG doesn't require temp adjustment. Only the reading you measure needs to be adjusted for temp. Or better yet zero out your refractometer with distilled water that's the same temp as your wort. Do this easily by letting both the wort and distilled water sit at room temp until even, then calibrate, then take reading. Edit: SG scale ...


2

Both Brix and specific gravity are temperature sensitive but the conversion seems to be independent of that fact. That is, if you start with the correct value in Brix, your converted SG value will be correct. So you will want to make sure that your Brix value is temperature adjusted before you do the conversion. From what I've heard, refractometers ...


2

Might be a duplicate here: How to calculate alcohol without OG reading? It appears that there is a formula using your Specific Gravity from a hydrometer and if you pick up a refractometer, a measurement from that, that you can use to calculate the ABV. Jump to section "Measurement of ABV" at Brew Your Own for the formula. From the article: ABV = [...


2

There is some rather complex math that can calculate an OG, but requires a hydrometer and a refractometer reading post fermentation. Brewzor Calculator (android app) and Beersmith have these formulas. But in your case you could estimate using an OG of 1.040 which is typical for Apple juice.


2

I recently switched too. One problem I noticed with the smaller sample is that if you pull from the top of the vessle you may get some oils or other less dense particles collected at the top. This layer of particles doesn't effect the hydrometer much reading since the sample size is much larger. Precision - as long as temp is about 70f the hydrometer will ...


2

To add to the other answers, what you are looking for to determine how much sugar to add to your must (juice) is a Chaptalization calculator. Link to calculator here What this calculator tells you is that at 1.049 SG, if the must ferments to near complete dryness, you would have an ABV of 6.5%. By increasing the SG to 1.075, if the must ferments to near ...


2

Hydrometer will be effected by anything that will suspend in and displace a solution. Your best bet with not changing your process (straining) would be to take your OG readings with a refractometer. You would only need a single drop of clear solution then.


2

I think you mean a 5 gallon batch (19 L)? I don't know your specific recipe, but the corn sugar is usually for priming the bottles for carbonation after the beer is done. So you would boil your extract and hops, cool it down and put it in your jar or bucket for fermentation, add the yeast, and wait a week or two for it to be done. After all that, when the ...


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