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It is not mentionned anywhere on the web what the dry hop is. If you can buy small hop packs at your local brew store, try buying the smallest amount of Fuggles or East Kent Goldings and then compare the smells. I am suggesting those two hops, since I know they are used in Porters, but it could be any other, like: Glacier, Bullion or Northern Brewer...


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Okay, so I actually tried this. I made a simple gruit(Beer with herbs instead of hops), and I just used neem as the herb. It did not interfere with the yeast at all and created an interesting drink. It tastes a lot like neem tea, and is nice and bitter, but also tastes malty like beer. When warm and un-carbonated, it's not great, but when cold and carbonated ...


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According to the hops book from the great Brewing Elements series, if you store your hops pellets in the freezer in a vacuum bag, it should stay usable for up to three years in general. Loss of alpha acid will occur, but not too much. This is not true for fresh hops, though. I store my hops in a freezer at -16deg C and vacuum it always after use and am ...


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Most varieties will safely store frozen for up to a year if wrapped tightly with low oxygen content. Beyond one year you will likely begin to see some degradation.


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I'm not a professional chemist so I can't recommend any quantitative tests, but you could make a controlled subjective comparison against a package of purchased hops with known alpha acid content. The goal is not an exact number but a relative bitterness. Micro batches of a quart to 1/2 gallon size using either sugar water or a basic light malt extract, use ...


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