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5

Contamination('infection') will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. ...


5

You actually have observed the most important sign of active fermentation, which is the kraeusen. Guarantee you've got a leak somewhere in your fermenter causing the airlock not to push. It's rarely worth judging the state of fermentation based on airlock activity anyway, as it's often very likely to lead you wrong. In conclusion: you're fine, do not chuck ...


5

If you were getting beer/yeast coming out of your airlock, it seems safe to say your beer was fermenting, perhaps quite vigorously. It's not uncommon for a beer to ferment completely within a few days, so that signs of active fermentation will almost completely disappear. This may be what has happened. Or it could be that in replacing the airlock, you maybe ...


4

Cool them down to as close to freezing as you can to make sure as much as possible of the CO2 stays in solution. Then carefully vent the pressure from each one in a safe place. If it's not done carbonating then I'd repeat the above every day until it is. (Edit: it's done after 6 months...)


3

As @skvery suggested, backsweeten it to make it sweeter. Mead is quite devoid of nutrients (as honey is basically straight fructose) so a strong yeast bred specifically for mead / low nutrient fermentations will outperform an ale yeast and not become as stressed. Due to the strong yeast, more of the sugar will be converted to alcohol which is why ...


3

If you're in the US, the very first thing you should do is engage a lawyer who specializes in this.


3

You need a legal expert but here are just a few of the things you will need to worry about 1. federal and state liscencing 2. trademarking 3. land rights and water rights Are you talking about buying a distillery or building one? because each has its own slew of problems.


3

I don't think that this is going to work very well, stripping out the barrier between the freezer and the refrigerator. Any number of things could happen: You risk damaging the refrigerant lines that may pass between or go around the freezer portion, Unless you can disable the freezer, you may find it working extra hard to try and maintain the thermostat ...


3

For a ten gallon batch, you'll probably want to have about 11 gallons of wort at the end of the boil to account for kettle losses (dead space, break material, hops). If you figure you'll boil off roughly a gallon per hour and you might want to be able to do a 90 minute boil sometimes, your kettle will need to hold an additional 1.5 gallons. That puts you at ...


2

My bet is that after only 3 days, it wasn't really finished. In combination with the addition of amylase enzyme, you're simply seeing more fermentation activity. Fermentation does not always have an obvious visual component; gravity readings over time are the only solid way of knowing. My corny kegs are marked as "good" up to 150psi. 15 psi is extremely low ...


2

In addition to Franklin's answer, I would also say that if you are seein an active kraeusen with no airlock activity this early in fermentation it is fairly likely you may have a leak in your fermenter. Not knowing what you are using, I can tell you this has happened to me with plastic buckets. You should check your seal and make sure you have a good tight ...


2

What temperature is your fermenter. You may want to consider cooling it down if it is too high. That will slow fermentation and potentially produce better tasting beer if your temp is too high. Keep in mind that fermentation creates heat, so the fermenter will have a higher than room temperature. As far as no bubbles go, make sure that everything is snug ...


1

No you should carbonate with c02 only to about 2 volumes as nitro systems instruct. Then serve on beer gas using a higher than normal pressure than you would pure c02, up to 25psi.


1

You didn't mention it in your question, but I'm assuming that you've made a 5 gallon batch. When I put those ingredients into Beer Smith, it shows a starting gravity of 1.062, which is perfectly reasonable for an IPA. Let the beer finish fermenting. It will probably take a week or two longer than a lower gravity beer, so be patient. In the end you'll have ...


1

Since you don't have a hydrometer, it will be hard to tell what's really going on. But likely, what happened is that your fermentation got "stuck". In other words, let's assume the recipe's OG was 1.060. John Palmer estimates that each pound of DME yields 40 points of extract per gallon of water, or about 8 points per 5 gallons. Assuming you did a 5 gallon ...


1

The apple juice might have some viable wild yeast present, or it may be yeast from the air inoculated the juice. Wild yeast has a low alcohol tolerance which it probably why your cider has been weak. You'll get better, more consistent results by adding cultured yeast. Champagne yeast is fine choice, if you like your hard cider without any residual sweetness, ...


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