5

Don't pin it. This is a cask practice, but not necessary in your corny keg and will reduce the carbonation. In fact, you can prime it (fully sealed), wait 14 days, put it in the fridge and tap it in a few hours; the pressure built up during priming will let it flow, at least for a gallon or two. After which, if you can't put CO2 on it, prime it again and ...


5

Yes the head space is important. At the very least, you need the head space to cushion fluid volume expansion & contraction from temp change.


2

Mine seem to hold just under 5.25 gal.


2

I tested one of my pin lock kegs just the other day, and it came out to almost exactly five gallons. There was just a tiny bit of space left at the top after adding five gallons of water, as measured by filling a one-gallon pitcher five times. I don't know if pin lock and ball lock differ, nor do I know if it might vary by manufacturer. For what it's worth, ...


2

Gas compresses under pressure. Liquid doesn't. If you have no head space, then when CO2 is produced after bottling, there's nowhere for the pressure to go but to break the bottle. If you have too much head space, then if enough CO2 is produced to produce the bottle, then there's quite a bit of compressed gas expanding, and that expansion is dangerous, ...


2

What I've been told is that the CO2 from that space is what dissolves into the beer to carbonate it. I can tell you from my experience that little to no headspace makes the beer carb less and slower and lots of headspace makes it carb more.


2

You can do that, but you will lose a bit of the CO2 that has been produced. Assuming you cap, you will have to recap with new (sanitized) caps. If you work clean this should not give you any problems.


2

Unfortunately, none if this is ideal, but I guess you knew that! Leaving on the yeast cake for 2 months is clearly not an option, so really the only other option is to rack, and your keg is probably the best alternative you have. Over-priming (say with 300-400g of sugar) will mean you can try to expel some of the air and renewed activity of the yeast will ...


2

FWIW, you should realize that the CO2 you are degassing does not come from the blanket of CO2 in the fermentor. Its CO2 that dissolved into the wine during fermentation. I find the vacuum idea a cool way to degas though. In the future, I think your process needs to stay the same for using CO2 to keep the headspace free from O2. As for keeping it under ...


1

Let me answer your questions You will need that 2 gallons of head space for foaming. Don't use a six gallon bucket. Air is less of a concern during primary because of the volumes of CO2 produced but once the active fermentation has stopped, you need to be sealed in a carboy that is topped just a couple of inches from the bung. You want as little headspace ...


1

To answer your questions: It's not ideal, but it'll probably be fine Gasses mix, so you'll force a mix of oxygen and CO₂ out from the headspace. That will reduce the amount of oxygen, but won't eliminate it. Could work, without the "stir all sediment" bit. Could do, of course. :) You can certainly prime a keg. I'd probably over-prime a bit since the keg ...


1

That's a question that's been debated with no definitive answer. Some say it's better to blow off the braun hefe becasue of the bitterness it might contribute. Others say it's better to use a larger fermenter so you don't lose yeast. There really is no right or wrong answer other than "try it each way and decide for yourself".


1

I believe the main reason for topping off wine is to reduce headspace. This is only necessary after initial fermentation, when the CO2 produced wards off Oxygen. Wine is very susceptible to oxidation. However, if you have the wine in a carboy already, use instinct to think about how much you will disturb the wine by topping off. I think people normally top ...


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