6

So far I found no difference in head retention from various relatively highly kilned specialty malts like crystal/caramunich etc. Carafoam is a different beast in that regard. Btw likely same level of head retention, as from carafoam, can be achieved with additions of flaked barley or torrified wheat. Not mentioning that healthy yeast and good fermentation ...


4

Proteins are what make head/foam. When I make cider I generally add some dry malt extract (<10% of total fermentables). This helps with some residual sweetness by holding up the final gravity some. I have also noticed slight increase in head retention vs other ciders. Not sure if you want to go that route, but it works for me. I don't know if there ...


4

Using specialty malts for head retention is kind of a canard. You'll have much better luck by controlling your fermentation....http://byo.com/stories/article/indices/35-head-retention/697-getting-good-beer-foam-techniques . To answer your question more directly, neither one is better than the other.


3

That grease in extraction fan is from volatile food grease / oils. In my experience these are not water soluable. The condensation that fell back in was most likely just water.


2

I mash from the grains and use maltodextrin to improve head retention, as well as a beer heading liquid containing propylene glycol alginate(PGA), which helps to stabilise the head and prevent collapse of the bubbles. The look and condition of my beers has drastically improved since using these additives but I'm not sure which is most reponsible. To get a ...


2

Maltodextrin will increase body using between 1/4 and 1lb in a 5 gallon batch. Although equally, using LME/DME instead of sugar with a kit will do a similar job and give you a much maltier beer. Maltodextrin has relatively little taste, so don't expect the beer to be much sweeter. To increase head formation and retention, and sweeten the beer, you can add ...


2

I only use maltodextrin with extract beers, added with the rest of the malt. You can add it at any time during the boil though. A pound in 5 or 6 gallon for IPA's type brews, 1/2lb in lighter beers. I don't think all grain brew needs it, but it greatly improves my P.D.Q. APA's. Kiwi Bruce


2

I would just boost the dextrins in the beer knowing that you will have additional oils from the chocolate (and the coffee). While its a good idea, I'm not sure cold-crashing/skimming would get all of the oil as a lot of it may still be dissolved in solution. Add some oats, extra flaked barley and/or dextrin malt to the mash. With respect to the coffee ...


2

Maltodextrin will have an affect on body also the head formation and retention, dry hopping may help foam stability as in increase in iso-humulones enhance head retention. I am not sure how dry hopping will affect the iso-humulone levels. Be warned with the Dextrins, if you have got a few too many tannins in the mix then addition of dextrins may form a ...


2

The head in beer is a result of the proteins and the alpha acids from the hops combining to form complexes that create the structure needed to maintain the head of foam. You may be able to add a small amount of hop oil and reduce other bittering components so the taste isn't adversely affected, and is still balanced by any sweetness in the beverage. If ...


2

The worst that could happen is that it would affect head formation and retention. But you might be OK. No big deal.


2

I would start with a mild dish washing soap with warm water, it usually gets rid of grease and oils. If you have a bottle brush, use it, if not shake the bottles well. Then rince the bottles well. If the glass bottles fit in your dishwasher, you can also give them a wash there first (glass only, not PET). If this doesn't work, then I would look for a ...


2

What not use a commercial brewing steriliser/cleaner like VWP? Soak in a solution made with very hot water overnight. One might find that all that is needed thereafter is a rinse with fresh water and drain dry. If necessary a scrub with a bottle brush should complete the job. Specifically, 1) It should be easy to get rid of the fat/oil without compromising ...


1

Since no one has really touched on this part of the question: 'Will [...] dry hopping post fermentation help a no head/thin beer?' No, and in fact dry hopping would probably only serve to make things worse. As Mr_road notes, it's the isomerized alpha-acids that contribute to foam stability. Dry hopping adds basically no isomerized alpha acids since ...


1

Another way to add to head retention is to pressurize your drink with nitrogen rather than CO2, think Guiness. This aides head retention as N2 does not dissolve as easily as CO2 in water therefore leads to a longer lasting tighter foam. I would try and mash some wheat to avoid the malty beer flavour if this is your concern. Using torrified wheat should ...


1

Here's a scientific publication that may interest you. (from the abstract) "Microscopic observations have shown that the fast antifoams rupture the foam films by the so-called "bridging" mechanisms, which involve the formation of oil bridges between the two surfaces of the foam film."


1

I decided to make some very pale bitter ("golden ale") for a change, with no addition of my normal 250g of standard crystal malt. So the only ingredient were my usual Maris Otter pale malt 2.5Kg/5 gallons, 100g pale rye malt 100g torrefied wheat. That makes an everyday brew of about 3.5% alcohol. The rye and wheat were added for flavour (rye) and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible