6

Even if you can't identify the strain, you can try using the cones to brew test batches, to see if it's any good as bittering hops, aroma or flavor. I did this with a batch of random "ornamental" hops, and liked the results enough to try to cultivate them.


5

I've spoken with hop growers and wholesalers about this before, and short of a DNA analysis there is almost no way to know for certain. You can make a rough guess based on the appearance of the hops and history of the area, but that's about it.


5

In Germany: Eickelmann In UK: Hopshop


5

Hops are normally grown from rhizomes to ensure you're getting the right strain - hop seeds will often be a cross-breed and may have unpredictable flavour or alpha acid characteristics. Differences between male & female plants are most noticeable once they flower. I don't know about suppliers in Europe, but you can generally find hop rhizomes even in ...


3

Cascade. They are the most fruitful of all, easiest to grow, and everybody knows and loves them. Citra. The new Cascade of the 21st century that most everybody knows and loves. Or alternatively, down under by you, maybe you'd prefer Galaxy which is very similar. Hallertau. The classic that everybody knows and loves. Not quite as fruitful, but not bad, ...


3

Hops grow from Rhizomes, essentially a stick/root that you put in the ground. Make sure you a string stretching 20 feet for the bines to grow up on. Here is a site that ships them internationally. http://www.freshops.com/order/international Here is some tips for growing hops http://www.oregonhops.org/culture2.html Cheers!


2

You can still use your hops, however buy some lady bugs or praying mantis' they will destroy the aphids. Also try planting marigolds near the hops it attracts lady bugs.


2

It will depend on the variety and your weather. I live in the middle of prime hop growing country. I have one Cascade plant that's about 12 years old now. I get anywhere from 20-27 lb. of wet hops each year from it. Enough that it's a hassle to pick, dry, and vacuum package them.


2

Short answer; no. (Unless the parent was old school and painted the room blue or pink.) However, for a flowering plant: Cones are the female flower. The male flowers appear as small clusters of round buds from http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=405875 First comment on page has a pic of both.


2

I have been keeping 3 bines per plant with mine. I wait until there are 3 bines that are about one foot long each (or more) and assume these are the strongest. Then I just cut all the rest and continue to prune any new ones that pop up.


2

This my first year growing hops, I was under the impression that home hop growers are really just looking for something reasonably strong but cheap, since you'll likely just be cutting it away after the season. So going too expensive is a waste of money since it'll unlikely be reusable, but just enough to have something strong and weather proof for the ...


2

I have tried a string-like twine and plastic-coated metal wire. The plastic-coated metal wire is so much better. Stronger, and the hops are training themselves up them better without the need for manual intervention.


1

Medusa is just a commercialized named for multihead. You can get them, as well as Canadian Red Vine (currently sold-out) from Great Lakes Hops. https://www.greatlakeshops.com/store/p113/MultiheadNeomexicana


1

It depends a lot on what your local growing conditions are, since it's well into the growing season at this point. If it were me (northeast US) I'd probably keep the two existing shoots, and train a few more of the new ones as well, then trim everything else that comes up. The first year of growth is mostly about establishing a strong root system. On ...


1

I imagine most cheap twine will work just fine. Jute or another cheap twine used for gardening should be doing fine. You will cut the vines down every year, so I wouldn't go for something expensive. I can't imagine you would have more than 50lbs on one vine, so strength is probably not a huge concern.


1

I am sorry to say this but there isn't really a substitute for Nelson Sauvin it is a rather unique hop. Some people suggest: Riwaka, Motueka; but they are not to my mind a reasonable substitute. I really think you are going to struggle to find anywhere selling NS rhizomes, they don't seem to be available for sale.


1

If growing conditions are optimal you'll get plenty of hops. I have 3 varieties growing and my Fuggles is the most dominant. 2nd year I had close to 2 lbs dried and packaged off a single rhizome so 5-8 rhizomes will get you plenty of picking opportunities. I've read on average you can expect a healthy rhizome will produce 1.5 to 2 lbs in a good season.


1

Certainly don't cut them all back, from my knowledge its best to focus on three bines. If you want a good yield out of your plant, that is generally the accepted number of bines your hop plant will produce good healthy hop cones. A good referenece is here: http://www.growinghopsathome.com/


1

Pruning bines is most critical during the first year when the rhizomes are getting established. The main problem with too many bines after that is that they get hopelessly entangled and it gets harder to pick the flowers. I think they also reach a point where the plant is blocking the sun from itself. The optimal number of bines is dependant on the amount ...


1

Hops don't grow from seeds...they grow from rhizomes. I recommend you talk to Hop Union about getting rhizomes. The closer you are to the 45th parallel, the better they will grow.


1

As I understand it hop vines are pretty vigorous (growing to be up to 3m tall in one season), so yes, I would worry about them choking out grapes (or at least competing for leaf space) if they were planted to use the same trellis. Of course, like most close plantings, they may work fine, just with somewhat lowered yields each. You should try it for one ...


1

You also need to be careful that you are not planting any male hops, which could potentially be cross pollinated with other hop plants in the area. Here in the US they only sell female rhizomes to ensure that they are the only type out growing. Male hop plants are tightly controlled.


1

As Denny said it will reduce your vertical growth. However as the years go on you'll get more shoots coming up than you want to train if you are trying to keep things tidy and growth maximized. At that point you can compete with the birds and eat the hop shoots / tops yourself. If you google you'll find recipes for pickling them and when to harvest. Some of ...


1

Most hops in the US are grown in the Yakima valley, technically a desert. Watering hops may be necessary depending where you are located but let me assure you any water there would be irrigation from the grower, as there is little or no rainfall. Dripline has been recommended on many sites and I would predict this is the standard of the region.


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