Hot answers tagged

7

A ginger bug is simply a lactic acid culture started from raw ginger root (with skin still on) and sugar mixed together in dechlorinated water. When you "add the ginger bug" to your drink recipe, you're adding the liquid from this culture after straining out the chopped ginger bits. After the ginger bug has been allowed to mature to a slightly fizzy state (...


5

Ginger juice alone does not have enough sugar to be fermentable. However, ginger beer is a popular, slightly alcoholic beverage made from ginger root, sugar, water and citric acid. Take a look at this question and answer.


5

Ginger has its own microbes that will change fermentation. You will want to kill if you just want ginger flavor and aroma. I would suggest making a ginger slurry then pastureize it by bringing it to about 200°F (90°C) for about 3 minutes. Cool it in a sanitary way (cover / seal). Then add this slurry late fermentation when most of your alcohol is present.


4

You're probably not getting fermentation in the bottle. "make the ginger tea/syrup in a stainless steel pot" What are you doing in this step? If you are boiling to make a syrup you are killing the ginger plant (bug). It won't be around to make CO2 when you bottle. "Stir, then immediately bottle the contents." Are you also adding (boiled) sugar at ...


4

If primary fermentation is complete, adding priming sugar only allows the wort to consume the newly added sugar; it doesn't continue to ferment afterward. In a 5gal corny keg, 4 oz of corn sugar will be sufficient. You must leave it at room temp (just like a bottle) for a couple of weeks. It should carbonate just fine. (Akin to cask conditioning). You can ...


3

No hands on experience on this kind of brew, but a few thoughts: You have a few options, add the ginger to the boil, to the primary fermenter or to the secondary fermenter (or if you don't have/use another fermenter, to the primary after the active fermentation is done). Each will most likely give different results, I would guess adding it to the boil may ...


3

Youngs Super Wine yeast is superb (I don't work for them by the way). The taste is amazing, but you have to be careful to "proof" bottles after bottling. Check after 12-24 hours. They will explode if left for 2 days or so. (Read online about exploding Ikea flip top lids in ginger beer making). Also if bought in 60g compound, refrigerate after first use. If ...


2

I once made ginger candy. The secret to the spiciness was in heating the ginger, letting it cool and then heating it again. Each heating and cooling cycle added quite a bit more kick to the ginger. I would imagine the same would be true for ginger beer. After the fourth cycle, the ginger was so spicey that I could not eat it!


2

That kick of ginger typically gets stronger with longer steeping time. After some experimentation, I'm convinced that the "bundenburg" flavor comes from long steeping and pear juice.


2

As kids, we used to grow a ginger beer "plant" up from Ginger & Sugar and a few Sultanas. Every couple of days we would add a bit more sugar-water to it. There were no real measurements, but I know for sure we did not add any yeast other than what was on the skin of the dried fruit. (Obviously if it grows a chunky black pellicle, you don't use it.) ...


2

The longer you heat it, the stronger it is. Don't use the liquid into it's cooled with the ginger in it. Acid and chili pepper or Cayanne help as well, I use cayenne and lime.good luck


2

Ginger Bugs can provide very sharp amounts of ginger flavor depending on the quality and quantity of ginger used in the ginger bug. It is a fun, easy, inexpensive and surprisingly versatile ferment that I encourage noobs to master first. Then also do the GingerBeerPlant (GBP) grains when you can find a source of GBP. GBP grains are very similar to water ...


2

To Exactly answer your questions: Is it possible, Does anyone know the process? Yes, you would have to ferment some wine then add a very high ABV% of Alcohol, acquired, paid or distilled by another means. Example ratio: 300ml of 10% wine + 700ml of 80% spirit = 59%ABV How much yeast, should I use in the grape juice? Go for 1 tsp per gallon(4.5L). can I ...


2

When the bug is ready to use, it should NOT smell like fresh ginger. The ginger bug should smell like ginger at first, and then as the days go by and you add more ginger and sugar it starts to develop a yeasty/alcoholic smell. The bug is made to get the yeast culture going, so it makes sense that it smells like that. I can still smell the ginger in mine,...


2

I have put my ginger beer plant through hell and it always comes back. I left it in the fridge for 2 months once and it was fine. I spilled it all over the floor and rescued a few particles and restarted it. The only thing I can find to consistently kill it is store-bought lemon juice that has preservatives. I'm sure yours is totally fine. As @kevbonham says ...


2

The yeast/bacteria are unlikely to be dead, but may have gone dormant for a number of reasons. If you added sugar too quickly, you may have decreased the water activity too much. This is one reason honey is so resistant to microbial growth - too much solute in the liquid. If you weren't adding ginger when you fed the bug (or your ferment is really active),...


2

If it was "fizzy" but not now that is on par with other starters, and sounds normal. If by taste you don't have the residual sweetness from the sugars then the "bug" has grown and consumed the sugar. If this is the case, then your starter is ready to inoculate your sodas.


2

Well, theoretically you can add any kind of yeast to any kind of grape extract and, provided conditions are sanitary, you don't get an infection, and you give it enough time to ferment, you will have a wine of some sort. Unfortunately, it probably won't be very good. In fact, it will probably be horrible. To make drinkable wine will require proper juice, ...


2

Oxygen! The growth medium must be oxygenated from time to time. If one uses tap water then minerals and trace elements are rarely a problem but available nitrogen may be. The ginger beer SCOBY is quite good at using the ground ginger to obtain most nutrients other than sugars but sometimes a bit of yeast/wine nutrient helps. Friends have added a shot glass ...


2

When you use some of the ginger bug you simply add back the amount of liquid afterwards. You can keep it going for as long as you want, just keep feeding it ginger and sugar at regular intervals and it will keep bubbling along for as long as you want it! Tip: if you don't need the ginger bug for a while you can put it in the fridge and only feed it once a ...


2

Yeast is a mould (fungus), so you want your ginger bug to have mould. If it has brightly coloured mould - black, red, yellow, discard it. Generally yeast will stay in suspension for a while, before settling to the bottom, making a creamy-white layer. While it's fermenting, yeast produces a lot of weird smells. If it's stopped bubbling, the yeast has ...


1

That recipe has a potential ABV of about 5.5% if allowed to completely ferment. It's carelessly labeled non-alcoholic. Depending on what yeast you actually have in your ginger bug this could ferment very quickly. In a matter of hours. Some strains will even continue in cold conditions. It may take a few tries at a bug before you get one that works well. ...


1

Rough filtration followed by sterile filtration, add back sugar, then force carb. This wouldn't be cheap or easy (or even practical at your volume). I would suggest you just purchase a ginger beer for something like this.


1

I have made ginger beer from regular old yeast before so there is nothing inherent about ginger that makes it unsuitable for yeast fermentation. Yeast technically speaking is a fungus not bacteria so how things that have anti bacterial qualities interact with fungi I'm not sure.


1

I have been feeding my ginger bug for a few years now, had to start over a few times. Your ginger bug will initially just smell like the ginger you've used, however fresh it may be. As you continue to feed it there will be a higher concentration of yeast, and especially dead/dormant yeast. This you can see as a layer at the bottom of your ginger bug ...


1

Mine always smells fresh, tho I start a new one every week or two, Ive noticed that letting it go to long can somtimes cause a "sulfury" smell in the final beverage. Ps. A ginger beer "scoby" is made of Wild ginger... its not bakers yeast or kombucha (Which I'm pretty sure is made from the wild yeast on tea leaves), make your own culture, its a lot more ...


1

I know this sounds too easy, but I had half of a batch do this. I was using two different types of bottles (8oz. and 16 oz.). It ends up that the smaller bottles had thin, cheap, rubber gaskets, and there wasn't a good seal. No seal = no pressure buildup = no carbonation. I used almost the exact recipe/process the OP used. I noticed the problem when I ...


1

is it better to use organic ginger That depends on a lot of factors but organic produce seems to have better taste than conventional produce. As to what kind of sugar it entirely depends on what color you want the liquid to have and the taste. Here's a good ginger bug recipe Break off a knob from your hand of ginger, peel away its papery skin and ...


1

In malt beer production, we (can) bottle after the primary fermentation, often making a simple syrup of priming sugar to aid CO2 production. You can also purchase “carb tabs” (sugar pills) which have really simplified my life but receive mixed reviews online. Added sugar will dry out the taste slightly and you probably still have enough sugar and yeast in ...


1

Getting ABV at that level is possible through distillation process. Although it won't be classified as wine anymore if the ABV is 60%. Here you go to get started making wine. You can know how much yeast should be used at that tutorial as well. We can make wine using either brewer or baking yeast and it's drinkable, but you won't get optimal result if ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible