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The skin of sultanas or raisins have natural occurring yeast needed for the fermentation process. Older recipes typically used a 'ginger bug' derived from the yeast on sultana skin in stead of brewers yeast. It is not coincidental for the sultanas to float as this indicative of the fermentation process active also within the swollen sultanas.


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It's safe to drink. It could potentially have some type of wild bacteria (lacto perhaps), although depending on the brew ingredients this could just be some coagulated oils etc. However, it won't hurt you either way, although introduction of wild yeast could create some off-flavors.


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If you have "spritz", which is carbon dioxide gas, then you have fermentation. No need for concern. Ginger beer often will not have the yeast krausen layer on top, the yeast remains suspended within the beer itself until it is finished and then will settle out. All you need now is patience. Just leave it alone. All is well. Cheers, good luck, ...


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It's about different flavor profiles. One is a cleaner ferment simpler flavor profile, the other offers more complexity. Using the open container to catch wild microbes is definitely hit or miss. The best bet for this type of flavor profile is to get ginger bug from an established source (commercially or a fellow ginger beer brewer). A good strong bug ...


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Right so there's no "optimal" method for this, brewing is a balancing act between sweetness, alcohol, carbonation-pressure and yeast. Even things like the shape of the fermentation vessel effect the performance of the yeast. You will always need a little trial and tweaking, and this is part of the fun. So a ginger beer "bug" (or "plant") is typically a ...


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I believe the difference has historical implications. Additionally ginger bug is said to have beneficial healthful properties that are absent in the shortcut recipe. It’s supposed to be much more probiotic. A bug cultivates the yeasts already present on the ginger root meaning that those yeasts are attracted to ginger and will ferment the ginger itself ...


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The yeast will be using the sugar to make alcohol and carbon dioxide. I'm not sure where you read that it will get sweeter, but as far as I know the more sugar you add the more the yeast will consume. The best way to sweeten it is to add a sweetener such as Stevia. You can only use sugar/honey/maple syrup if your yeast has died. Be careful adding sugar ...


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I'm assuming you made a pseudo soft-drink Ginger Beer, where it's mostly a sweet beverage, and yeast is primarily used to bring carbonation (and only incidental alcohol). The problem you will have is over-carbonation, the ginger beer will not "go bad". The yeast will continue consuming the sugar until none is left, or the amount of alcohol it produces is ...


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Just be patient, it is perfectly normal for there to be little to no pressure after the first day. Especially if you do not live somewhere hot to supercharge the yeast. If you do not start seeing any activity by day 3 I'd add another half cup of your now very active ginger bug to get it started. I live in a hot climate and I need 2 days for second ...


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Yeast is a mould (fungus), so you want your ginger bug to have mould. If it has brightly coloured mould - black, red, yellow, discard it. Generally yeast will stay in suspension for a while, before settling to the bottom, making a creamy-white layer. While it's fermenting, yeast produces a lot of weird smells. If it's stopped bubbling, the yeast has ...


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Vinegar has a fairly distinctive flavour. If you can't taste it, I would say no. During fermentation, the yeast rapidly uses-up all the dissolved oxygen in the vessel. Acetobacter needs oxygen to turn ethanol into vinegar. So as long as your air lock was in-place, the fermentation will maintain a positive pressure of carbon dioxide. So there should be ...


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My ginger beer gets hotter if I strain the ginger mixture multiple times. So after straining after a simmer of 30 minutes, move the strained ginger mixture into a pan add hot water and boil (5 min). Do this several times (5 times) until strained water runs clearer. It doesn't take more time if you have to top up a 23L drum with hot water.


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Your recipe seems fine. I usually use only a tablespoon full of ginger bug. I think you're opening the bottle way too soon. Carbonation needs at least 5 days. 7 will be better. I suggest you use soda bottle to bottle it. The hardness will tell what's going on. if it goes a bit out of shape, you can burp the bottle by opening it a bit. That should solve your ...


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I have been feeding my ginger bug for a few years now, had to start over a few times. Your ginger bug will initially just smell like the ginger you've used, however fresh it may be. As you continue to feed it there will be a higher concentration of yeast, and especially dead/dormant yeast. This you can see as a layer at the bottom of your ginger bug ...


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Mine always smells fresh, tho I start a new one every week or two, Ive noticed that letting it go to long can somtimes cause a "sulfury" smell in the final beverage. Ps. A ginger beer "scoby" is made of Wild ginger... its not bakers yeast or kombucha (Which I'm pretty sure is made from the wild yeast on tea leaves), make your own culture, its a lot more ...


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