7

A ginger bug is simply a lactic acid culture started from raw ginger root (with skin still on) and sugar mixed together in dechlorinated water. When you "add the ginger bug" to your drink recipe, you're adding the liquid from this culture after straining out the chopped ginger bits. After the ginger bug has been allowed to mature to a slightly fizzy state (...


7

I'm not sure if this is true in ginger-beer making, but in mead-making, raisins are sometimes added to supply nutrients for the yeast. The all honey and water mixture which is the mead starting point cannot host a very healthy yeast colony without the trace minerals supplied by the raisins. Maybe it is the same for ginger beer... BTW. If you can get your ...


6

During the start of the fermentation the Yeast reproduces quickly using the oxygen present in the beer and produces diacetyl which imparts a buttery flavor. Which is why it is usually recommended to start the fermentation at a lower temperature to slow down the diacetyl production (and the reproduction rate, I suppose). The beer fermentation is then '...


6

Putting a few raisins in a bottle before you cap it, will let you know when its carbonated as the raisins, will float to the top after. They sink at first.


5

Bottle priming takes typically 2 weeks, depending upon temperature and yeast health. The bottles should initially be stored at room temperature so the yeast can produce CO2 from the priming sugar, which takes 2-3 days. If you opened the bottle then, you'd get a loud hiss and flat beer, since all the CO2 is in the headspace. After the CO2 is produced, it ...


5

The skin of sultanas or raisins have natural occurring yeast needed for the fermentation process. Older recipes typically used a 'ginger bug' derived from the yeast on sultana skin in stead of brewers yeast. It is not coincidental for the sultanas to float as this indicative of the fermentation process active also within the swollen sultanas.


4

I've had success using 3-5 lbs of fresh ginger in a 5 gallon batch of ginger soda. I find it's important to very finely cut the ginger (I use a strong blender/food processor). Once I've simmered the ginger for about 15-30 minutes, I strain the pulp into a grain sock and squeeze as much liquid as possible from it. I use my hands to do the pressing (warning:...


4

The recipe you followed is for a (mostly) non-alcoholic ginger beer (a soda/soft drink). The fermentation here is really just for carbonation. Not sure if you get Fentiman's where you live, but it's like that. It should be sweet with little alcohol, so you did it right. Adding more ginger flavor is easy - just add more ginger. I use this recipe for a soft ...


4

If primary fermentation is complete, adding priming sugar only allows the wort to consume the newly added sugar; it doesn't continue to ferment afterward. In a 5gal corny keg, 4 oz of corn sugar will be sufficient. You must leave it at room temp (just like a bottle) for a couple of weeks. It should carbonate just fine. (Akin to cask conditioning). You can ...


4

I can't say for sure, as I've never made ginger beer per se, but I have used it in beer before. According to Wikipedia, the main chemical component of fresh ginger's pungency is gingerol, which, when pure, actually scores 60,000 Scoville Heat Units. On drying or cooking, part of the gingerol becomes shogaol, which is more than twice as hot (rating 160,000 ...


4

I'm a bit late to the conversation, but I also recently started brewing my own Ginger Beer using a Ginger Bug and bottling in the Grolsch-Style swing top bottles. I've had very good success with this method, and got curious as to the pressure capabilities of the swing-top style vs. a crimped top, as I would like to continue experimenting with commercial ...


3

Using ReaLemon could negatively affect your ginger beer, but it is hard to tell the effect without knowing the concentration of free sulfite (SO2) in ReaLemon. ReaLemon's label says it contains sulfite and the manufacturer says that any of their products that mention sulfites "contains 10 ppm or more of sulfites". After a short period of tolerance, ...


3

Ignoring the other ferementables (lime and pineapple juice) 3 cups of sugar weights about 600g - or 1.32lb. Table sugar has a potential of 1.046 points per pound per gallon, which gives an estimated SG of 46 x 1.32 / 2 = 30 gravity units So your ginger beer would have had an initial SG of 1.030. I plugged these figures into BeerSmith, which computes ...


3

I never go past 3 weeks on the primary yeast cake. If left too long the yeast can start to consume some of the trub material and produce "off" flavors. A month probably will be fine and I'm sure there are those who leave it sitting on the trub longer but I like to take it off and play on the safe side.


3

No hands on experience on this kind of brew, but a few thoughts: You have a few options, add the ginger to the boil, to the primary fermenter or to the secondary fermenter (or if you don't have/use another fermenter, to the primary after the active fermentation is done). Each will most likely give different results, I would guess adding it to the boil may ...


3

There's a good article about the ginger beer plant (which I think is your ginger bug) on this website. http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2008/07/ginger-beer-plant-101.html.


3

Youngs Super Wine yeast is superb (I don't work for them by the way). The taste is amazing, but you have to be careful to "proof" bottles after bottling. Check after 12-24 hours. They will explode if left for 2 days or so. (Read online about exploding Ikea flip top lids in ginger beer making). Also if bought in 60g compound, refrigerate after first use. If ...


3

Up front sharpness comes from acidity and to some degree, the level of carbonation. Most soft drinks have citric acid, and some phosphoric acid to create a sharpness to balance the sugar, and have a high level of carbonation (>3 vols CO2) Getting that sharpness is a balance thing - if you have too much sugar compared to the acid the drink will not be sharp, ...


3

I'm South African and my grandmother used to make ginger beer all the time when we were little and it always had raisins in. Unfortunately she is no longer around for me to ask her why but whatever the scientific reason is, I think it's the traditional way to make ginger beer in South Africa. I loved the raisins and will be adding some to my recipe!


3

It will be absolutely fine. Drink and enjoy. By dropping into the fridge so early you just caused the yeast to stop their work. By removing it and allowing it to warm you have restarted the fermentation. You could happily leave it out of the fridge for a few months and so long as the bottles can handle the pressure that could build you would have no issues. ...


3

The commercial brands terminate fermentation through pasteurization before the ABV gets above the FDA required 0.5%. The only way I see to deal with this at home is to limit the amount of sugar so it the total ferment doesn't exceed 0.5%ABV. In the bar setting you could make up for the lack of sweetness with your simple syrup when making the cocktail. IMO,...


3

Turbo yeast is very aggressive and consumes almost all sugars. Bitter is most likley from an unbalance in sweet / bitter. Add a non fermentable sugar like lactos to sweeten and counter the bitter to taste.


3

It does not work like that, No yeast will stop exactly at 5% (unless you kill it), this way of doing things is not safe ! First solution is to make your wort so that you end up with the correct among of alcohol after complete fermentation, and afterwards add non-fermentable sugars to your fermented wort. Some usual non-fermentables are maltodextrin or ...


3

Will the ginger beer taste different if you don't ferment? Yes. but mostly because you will have a sweeter product because the yeast didn't consume the sugar you put into it. You may want to adjust your sugar levels down a bit, or you may not. There could be some minor taste differences because of the lack of yeast by-products but with a 2.3% ABV ginger ...


3

First off all... If you're new to this, relax. There's a few sensible precautions to take that make a difference - sanitise your equipment before hand, keep it upside down when empty, keep your brew covered when not actively using it, start with either a bought yeast / bug, or a starter from a friend / trusted source. Do all these and you'll almost certainly ...


3

I like my ginger beer somewhat sweet and carbonated. This means that, at some point after bottling, the fermentation/carbonation process must be stopped. To determine this point, I bottle as normal (in glass bottles), but I also bottle one 500ml plastic soda bottle (an empty PET bottle, like coke, mineral water, etc.). I test this bottle daily to check the ...


3

It's about different flavor profiles. One is a cleaner ferment simpler flavor profile, the other offers more complexity. Using the open container to catch wild microbes is definitely hit or miss. The best bet for this type of flavor profile is to get ginger bug from an established source (commercially or a fellow ginger beer brewer). A good strong bug ...


2

I once made ginger candy. The secret to the spiciness was in heating the ginger, letting it cool and then heating it again. Each heating and cooling cycle added quite a bit more kick to the ginger. I would imagine the same would be true for ginger beer. After the fourth cycle, the ginger was so spicey that I could not eat it!


2

That kick of ginger typically gets stronger with longer steeping time. After some experimentation, I'm convinced that the "bundenburg" flavor comes from long steeping and pear juice.


2

The longer you heat it, the stronger it is. Don't use the liquid into it's cooled with the ginger in it. Acid and chili pepper or Cayanne help as well, I use cayenne and lime.good luck


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