Hot answers tagged

4

You should be OK. The connectors are not identical inside the keg. The beer out connector has a long tube to take it to the bottom of the keg. The gas in connector is open near the top of the keg. This is so the gas pushes the beer up the tube from the bottom. By reversing the posts you are effectively pushing the beer out the top of the keg by bubbling CO2 ...


4

Fermenting/fermented beer has something like 0.8 volumes of CO₂ dissolved into it. Adding hops creates a ton of nucleation points for CO₂ bubbles to form. Fermentation has likely not restarted. You can add the second batch of hops whenever you like.


3

As brewchez stated it mostly for stouts with a nitro faucet in the homebrew world. But Beergas is preferred commercially if a tap run is really long. The Beergas allows them to push at much higher psi without overcarbonating beer along the way, for all styles of beer.


3

Most draft systems for homebrewers use just normal CO2. The beer gas of N2 and CO2 is used for 'nitro' dispense depending on the N2/CO2 ratio.


2

No, length is not a problem. Just coil your beerline and tape it together so that it is not a mess whenever you open the door. CO2 should be outside the fridge. Yes, you can drill through the side, but the door is usually the safest. When drilling through the side, avoid the 5cm around the sides as there are cooling tubes running there. An even better idea ...


2

The system sounds to be unbalanced. If the inner diameter of the chilling coil in the jockey box is different than the one you've used before then the resistance is certainly off creating the unbalanced performance. A lot of foam and sputtering output at the faucet is normally caused by too low a serving pressure. I'd say up the pressure and see what you ...


2

You're making a real lager, so try to keep the temps as low as possible - around 50F/10C would be about ideal. (The fermentation will raise temperature this by about 6F/3C.) But if you don't and let it warm up, it will still be a lager - it's because of the yeast - S-23 is a true lager strain (Saccaromyces pastorianus). Lager yeast tend to produce sulphur -...


1

There is an alternative way I have found to work. If you have your keg in a kegerator and have run out of CO2, then follow these steps. First start by disconnecting the CO2 from the keg coupler. Use a bicycle pump with a needle used for blowing up sports ball to replace the CO2. Attach the needle to the CO2 line and use duct tape etc. to secure it. Once ...


1

You have not ruined the beer. If anything early in the fermentation, day 1-2 letting in a little oxygen is good for the yeast as it allows them to form more flexible cell walls. As Yeast require oxygen to create sterols which maintain cell wall flexibility. Usually you want to leave the lid covering but not locked down for day 1-2, to stop CO2 pressure ...


1

Yes, it will force CO2 into the liquid, but you probably don't want your lovely beer to be as fizzy as your cola. Therefore, if you would use 3 or 4 presses for the Soda, use only 1 or 2 presses for your beer, a bit of experimentation and I am sure it will all be fine. If I were doing it I would carbonate it just before serving and serve it out of the soda ...


1

A cO2 soda maker won't work well, as these usually have a preset infusion volume of cO2 for soda not beer. Soda has a co2 volume of 4.0 most beer styles are around 2.4 There is a cO2 gun of sorts we use in homebrew that attaches to a 2liter soda bottle and uses beverage co2 cartridges but it's unique in than you can give it shots of cO2. So you can carb up ...


1

Saflager S-23 is a lager yeast. http://www.fermentis.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/SFG_S23.pdf 9-22°C as it ferments 12-15°C when you lager the beer. http://billybrew.com/swamp-cooler-homebrew try doing swamp cooler to get that temp down and under control. Lager not recommended for someone starting out. If you can't control fermantion temperature then ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible