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The problem with much fresh "Supermarket fruit" is that it is usually picked early and is usually unripe. If one can find "ripe" or "over ripe" fruit in a supermarket then IMHO that is the fruit one really wants to use. Unfortunately such fruit has limited shelf life and so is usually difficult to find unless it has been marked down for quick sale. The most ...


4

First let me say you can pretty much make wine from all grapes, just some of that wine will be better than others. If I had a picture of the leaves, I could probably tell if it's wine grapes or not, but I am guessing that it's just table grapes. I think the easiest way to guess that wine grapes get powdery mildew quite easily and table grapes (bred from ...


3

Yes, when ripe is best. Cheers


3

One doesn't brew gin from sloe berries, you flavour gin with the sloes. There is no need to dry the sloes. Just pop them in a bottle with the gin and some sugar and leave for a couple of months. There are plenty of recipes if you look for them, and not a little voodoo. Some people like to freeze the sloes first, others will prick them (with a thorn from ...


2

Calcium is not going to be an issue. The sorbate as a preservative is likely going to be an issue. Pitch more yeast than you think you need to overcome the preservative.


2

Per this Homebrew Talk thread it seems like the primary reason pectolase is added earlier in the process is due to low alcohol tolerance. However there should have been virtually no alcohol when you added the pectolase as it takes hours for yeast to multiply and begin fermentation. Depending on how vigorous your fermentation is and possibly many other ...


1

I see two possibilities: The second recipe has an unrealistic final gravity and most likely isn't finished fermenting. Fruit has very simple sugars, with final gravities typically 0.992 to 0.999 regardless of yeast strain used in most cases, so unless there was a more complex sugar added, or an unfermentable sugar like lactose or maltodextrin, the second ...


1

With only two data points, the only thing you can conclude with any real confidence is that there is simply more dissolved sugar in a beverage with a higher finishing gravity. In the above example (again it's only two data points), it could be suggesting this particular yeast tops-out at around 8.8% AbV, because the second set of readings still retain quite ...


1

Yes, you can make good "wine" with supermarket fruits, but as you mentioned they are not always the most fresh resource available. Local fairs are a good source of fresh fruits, etc ... Not sure if your city has regular fairs, but in these places you can find lot of good stuff and also organic fruits. When I make melomel, flavored Kombucha or cider, I ...


1

The sugar will be consumed - up to a point. I have no experience making orange wine with cane sugar, but yeast can only convert just so much sugar to alcohol before the alcohol level becomes self-toxic. The amount depends on the yeast. I have used this technique to great advantage making mead, where simply varying the about of honey in the ferment takes ...


1

Just fermenting orange juice alone won't get you into a "wine" like strength. There isn't enough sugar in pure OJ alone. So these recipes include the addition of sugar to get the alcohol up. And yes the sugar will get "consumed during fermentation" to be more accurate... it will get fermented. It is not likely to be a sweet finishing product as the pure ...


1

Alcohol inhibits pectic enzyme. At around 16% you have some issues. Double the dose (of enzyme) and maybe double the time to clear, maybe 2-3 months.


1

I would give it a coulpe of weeks, if it has not cleared after 2 weeks I would add a second dose of pectalase as there is a chance the alcohol will have deactivated the enzyme. Regarding quantity to add follow the manufacture's guidlines. If still not clear, either bottle and drink cloudly or try adding some finings wait a week then bottle.


1

I only have experience with cider (and many thousands of gallons of grape wine, but it's not a problem with grapes). I put the enzyme in when I crushed the fruit (I suggest you do this next time) and it cleared very quickly in the secondary. It is usally less than a month. I suggest you wait a month or two, wine is about waiting, it's not beer. Gelatin could ...


1

I started out making a blackberry-Cabernet wine, adding if I remember 6 jars of jam to 3 gallons of water, x amount of sugar to a SG of 1.090 or about 12 % ABV. I used EC1118 yeast and low and behold I ended up with stuck fermentations every time, just about the same SG as you. If I recall correctly there is something in the jam (chemical) that interferes ...


1

I've had a number of beers and meads that after a week, fermenting in fridge, have had the bucket covered in mold. I don't know which kind of bucket you use, I use these. Since they are very well sealed, every time I had this "problem", I washed the exterior with a washing brush and sprayed a sanitizer all over the exterior. Until now I had no contaminated ...


1

Wine grapes have a really thick pith inside and make seeds, table grapes generally have less pith and are seedless varieties. Here's a diagram. Harvesting them when ripe is the hard part, you have to take a random sample and check the sugar levels with refractometer. Iirc, 31 brix or so is fully ripe; less suitable varieties will peak at lower values. Edit:...


1

If they are not sweet, they are most probably not very good to make wine. Some grapes are good to be eaten, but do not produce good wine. I tried making wine from sweet dark grapes that looked like wine grapes but were not (forgot the name), so I ended up throwing it out, the lack of acidity and taste were not up to par. You can try a small quantity, ...


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