4

That beer definitely needs more time. It's likely that the periods of lower temperature slowed or potentially even halted fermentation, and the sweet smell you describe is probably unfermented sugars in the wort. You just need to warm that brew up a bit (19°C as you've said there is perfect) and wait another couple of days at least. At best, bottling now ...


4

Calculate the recipe as if you were adding all the honey up front. Also take an original gravity reading with just a partial amount of honey present; if you divide the gravity points by the number of pounds of mead you used, you should know how many more points will be added later on. For instance, if you were say adding 9 pounds of honey up front, then ...


2

If the gravity is indeed stable, I think @phillippe's answer is good, logical advice and would be wise to follow. On the other hand, if this is a 5gal(19L) all grain batch with ~10lbs of fermentable grain, I don't think your SG could be much over 1.050. This is of course an assumption, based on ~10 pounds of grain and average efficiency. That means you've ...


2

In general, you can consider you fermentation completed when you get the same gravity reading for 3 days in a row. It is either completed or stuck (I won't go on the details here, but do a search on 'stuck fermentation' if you like). In your case, 1.028 seems low enough to be considered finished. You can go ahead and bottle, however, I would recommend ...


1

If your hydrometer is not reading correctly then yes this could be the issue. In tap water at 20 or 25 depending on calibration it should read 1000+/-0.5. If it is reading 1006 then it is a fair way off. Applying a correection factor of 1021 = 0006 => 1015 which is pretty close to your target of 1014. I I strongly suggest you get a new hydrometer. I would ...


1

The general rules I used to know if yeast is done, is 3 consecutive days with the same gravity measure. At that point, you can conclude that it is done or stuck, but with a FG of 1.014, it seems low enough to me to call it done. People do not always reach the attenuation written on the yeast package. It is never too late to add yeast, but adding more yeast ...


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