7

If you are worried about the yeast getting through that bag, you have nothing to worry about. When we talk about sterile filtration, the generally accepted size of the filter is .45u (micron). 1000 microns = 1 millimeter. While the mesh on that bag is less than a millimeter, it's not even close to .45u. I don't think that most breweries even sterile filter ...


6

'Is there a disadvantage to screening my grain to remove the flour before mashing?' Aside from your point about losing extract (the most important thing, really), a few things I can think of: Fine flour disproportionately represents potential extract, by weight. "Fine grits and flour [...] yield some 50-60 % of the weight of milled malt but 80-90% of the ...


5

It it not a necessary step. (Neither is "secondary", usually.) [EDIT: I missed a potential misconception you have about transfering the yeast when kegging:] Usually, you will attempt to minimize how much yeast you transfer into the kegs, as instead of using priming sugar and yeast to carbonate, you can force-carbonate by applying direct and measured CO₂ ...


5

I also have had a similar issue. I switched bags from the handmade swiss voile to one I bought at a homebrew shop which had wider mesh. What happened was pretty disturbing. The beer was suddenly full of fine material which was boiling up and creating a very nasty mess on the side of the pot. I cleaned this crap out several times as it built up over the ...


5

What you describe in your comments sounds like trub (pronounced "troob"). It's mostly yeast, proteins, fats, and sometimes hop material. It's totally normal for that stuff to settle to the bottom of the vessel after fermentation is complete. You don't filter it; you just let it settle and then carefully siphon the beer off while picking up as little of the ...


4

200L? Wow. You might consider using a length of copper tubing with slits cut in it, instead of a false bottom. My mash tun came with a false bottom which was always a bit of a pain to get nicely into place. One day I replaced it with the copper tube thing and I love it! I have since replaced my mash tun with a larger one, but I'm still using the same ...


4

I think you have the right idea about sealing the rim of your false bottom. The common method is to use a length of vinyl tubing slit lengthwise. The false bottom fits into the slit as you wrap the tubing around it.


4

No. Unless it's a cloudy style that relies on particulates. But putting that bag over your racking cane will probably just clog up and be a frustrating mess. I would use finings and cold crash. Then use the racking cane as intended no to disturb the trub.


3

I also use BIAB with a bag bought online. The flour from the crushed grain flows pretty freely out of the mash and is present after the boil and chill as a huge cloud settling towards the bottom of my fermenter. Whirlfloc definitely helps clump the stuff together with the cold-crash material, but the goop clogs every filter I have tried. I've also ...


3

If you are using a grain bag wrapped tightly around the racking tube, it will clog very quickly. Also, flexible tubing draped over a kettle will collapse, or at least narrow, as hot wort is passing through it. You should use a rigid racking cane with a cap on the end that keeps the bottom of the cane raised from the bottom of the kettle by a few millimeters. ...


2

assuming you do it post fermentation, you will oxidize the beer badly. Not a good idea.


2

You won't necessarily pick up more oxygen, if you purge both the keg, carboy and filter with CO2. Purging will minimize the exposure to oxygen. But you'd need 3 transfers: rack from the carboy to the keg (only the keg will handle pressure.) from the keg, through the filter, to the carboy. finally, rack from the carboy to the keg again. With this many ...


2

There are several different homebrewing filters out there. 1 micron and 3 micron filters are most typical. It will dramatically reduce the quantity of yeast getting passed to the bottle so you may want to pitch some krausen with your priming sugar if you are going to ferment in the bottle. Not too sure if it really makes sense to filter if you are going to ...


1

At 5 gallons a week, you're doing volumes that could justify a Buon Vino Super Jet, especially if you're batching your filtrations so you do four at a time or so. I've got a long background in wine filtering. Check the following links for more info General filtering discussion http://www.timvandergrift.com/?p=225 Using the Mini Jet https://www.youtube....


1

You obviously understand that you’ll be stripping the yeast out of your beer with filtering. That will need to be replaced in order to bottle condition your beer. How much should you put back in is a guesstimate in my opinion. If you reintroduce the sediment to your beer, you are back where you started, clear beer now made temporarily cloudy with yeast ...


1

You'll get some sediment for sure. To just about completely prevent sediment you'd have to force carb your beer (kegging). Sort of a way to experience it is if you buy a commercial beer that is 'bottle conditioned', you'll notice a little but of trub on the bottom of the bottom. However if you let the bottles condition, then leave them in the fridge for a ...


1

I believe Irish moss or carageen moss (a type of seaweed) is used as a fining agent in commercial brewing. I'm afraid I can't comment on filtration.


1

I just cold age my beers in kegs so they drop clear in about a week. I can then jump the beer to another keg or bottle after dropping clear to not have to worry about shaking a keg and then having to let all that stuff settle out again. I have used bentonite in mead and wine. It worked really well. (it is a volcanic clay so not animal based.) I've ...


1

1) I've not used plate filters but seems they would work well, but be expensive. I use a cartridge water filter, and find they are easily cleanable and reusable a few times. 2) Try Clairty Ferm, is enzyme based and it can actually drop gluten to FDA "gluten free" levels. https://www.whitelabs.com/other-products/wln4000-clarity-ferm-brewers-clarex If you ...


1

Depending on filter size, it could filter out yeast. Also, unless you have a closed filter system pushed by CO2 you will oxidize your beer. I used a filter for a little while but stopped. I found it to be a PITA for not much benefit and also found that it seemed to strip body and flavor from the beer.


1

You might want to try a "Cold Crash" first too. Depending on your situation, if you can get your carboy to a location where it is very cold and let it sit over night, you might get it to settle a little more. Put it in a location where you don't have to move it before racking.(Garage?) Not sure if your bottling, but if you are, you might do it in two ...


1

The following is pure imagineering. I have never been in the situation you are describing, but thinking about hard ginger-beer, I may have to change that pretty soon. Take this with a grain of salt and other members, please pipe in if necessary. Given the quantity of suspended particles which you are talking about, you might have better luck pouring the ...


1

What about some cheesecloth or butter-muslin tied around the end of your racking cane that will go in the primary? You could easily sanitize it by boiling or soaking in your choice of no-rinse sanitizer. Using some similar filter on the other end of the racking tube could work too, but I'd be worried about oxidation. You should probably rack the clear beer ...


1

One way to filter the beer is using finings. I don't know their impact on purines but they certainly clear beer fairly well. SuperKlear works well and you can watch the line between clear and cloudy move down the carboy over a couple of weeks. I also don't know if there is any kind of purine tester, but something like that may be useful to determine the ...


1

There is a new product on the web (you can for sure get it on Amazon.com) called SafeTASTE. It is a concentrated product that adds the tasty minerals back to distilled or reverse osmosis water - only a few drops are need in each cup of water. 1 mL will flavor an entire liter. It has the same minerals, in the same forms and the same concentrations relative ...


1

If there is yeast in suspension, then filtering out the yeast will make the beer color appear darker. When you add yeast, (e.g. when making a starter) the color becomes progressively lighter - the yeast cells make the beer more reflective. When you remove the yeast cells, the beer becomes less reflective, and darker. The beer will also become clearer, ...


1

If it's just a little (a few centimetres) sediment at the bottom, then I'd say to just pour slowly when you near the bottom of the bottle, and try to avoid shaking/disturbing the bottle too much when handling and transporting. Wine I've bought commercially sometimes has sediment and as long as you're careful, it's not a major problem. If it really is as ...


1

I go through this with many gallons of wine in our kegs. In time, all sediment drops out, most within 1 week of transfer. This might seem too obvious and simple, but you must give it time. Any more "movement" and you will get more oxidation than you want. Rajanatha Head Brewer of Kauai's Hindu Monastery


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