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1

Cold alone is not really an option, since yeast will not die but become dormant, and could be reactivated after heating a little. There are a few ways to acheive this: Pasteurization This will kill the yeast, but heating could affect the final product in some cases. Filtration A very fine filter can remove yeast particles. Sweeteners/Less sugar Adding ...


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Two months is not too much, if the temperature is not too hot. Best scenario, you could be lucky and still have some water in the airlock. Beer might be fine. Worst scenario, water has evaporated in the airlock. Beer has a great risk of contamination or spoilage. As for the smell, it will depend on temperature as well. If the airlock is dry and the ...


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The foam you are talking about is normally called "kraĆ¼sen" (mostly) or "barm" (sometimes, UK). The sediment at the bottom is excess yeast and trub that has dropped out of your beer. Even if a fermentation is going on for a longer time, this layer will form, so do not worry about that. Looking at the picture, I see that you had a very vigorous fermentation. ...


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The main problem with leaking buckets and fermenters is that when the fermentation finishes, normal air will start to enter and might start oxidising your beer. This air will mix with the carbon dioxide. How much it might stale and oxidise your beer depends on the size of the leak and the exposure time of course. For the fermentation itself a leaky bucket ...


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I agree with chthon. In any case, the results will be different than the orginal recipe. One thing that is affected by doubling the malt is the hop utilization. Hop utilization varies depending on the pre-boil gravity : http://howtobrew.com/book/section-1/hops/hop-bittering-calculations Hopefully, you used enough water in your mash to get a good ...


2

The first problem is that the Mangrove Jack's Empire Ale yeast has an alcohol tolerance of only 8%. Using some beer recipe software, the amount of malt you used would lead to an alcohol percentage of 15%. Which means that your yeast will stop halfway the fermentation. Second, the amount of hops is not matched to the original gravity obtained by using 6kg ...


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I would boil the spray-malt in some water. This will both dissolve and sanitise the malt. As soon as it is at roughly the same temperature as the ferment, add it in and stir well, but minimising splashing as much as possible, so as not to re-introduce too much extra oxygen. The existing yeast should have no trouble consuming the new sugars. There should ...


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Obligatory Disclaimer I'm not at all experienced with brewing ... but I have some pretty good experience with spawning and cultivating mushrooms. That sure looks like a fungal growth to me. Classic mycelium threads, building into a network. Some Google Images for you that look pretty similar. Google Images : mycelium fungus As with all unknown fungi/...


4

This looks like Pediococcus contamination: see here Is this lactobacillus? More information about spoilage here: https://www.craftbrewingbusiness.com/news/four-bacteria-that-will-ruin-your-beer/ Lack of sanitation might have cause this.


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You could simply add some pressure from a CO2 cylinder - as if doing a pressure transfer. Maybe take some gas from inside an emptied keg. But really - I would not worry about it. If the ferment is still in the early vigorous stages, it will re-pressure the vessel. Even in the latter stages, carbon dioxide is still being created, and it will somewhat ...


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Vinegar has a fairly distinctive flavour. If you can't taste it, I would say no. During fermentation, the yeast rapidly uses-up all the dissolved oxygen in the vessel. Acetobacter needs oxygen to turn ethanol into vinegar. So as long as your air lock was in-place, the fermentation will maintain a positive pressure of carbon dioxide. So there should be ...


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