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Did you take hydrometer reading before you started? Do you need to be feeding it, with sugar and flavours? What yeast you using/are you following a recipe? short answer, It will be fine just wont match your recipe and you would have invented something new!!


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Did you take an hydrometer reading (OG) before ferment? If so, what was it and: take another reading, has it go down? Has it finished? with champagne yeast it should go dry (depenging on your OG reading), so a reading about 1.000 means there are no sugars left to ferment If you didn't take an hydrometer reading (and have a hydrometer) take a reading now, ...


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I use pet bottles - having made this mistake before, I found that the bottles delaminated (you get blisters between the layers) the bottles look a bit cloudy, but still function just fine(!). I have used them many times since. When this happened, I spent a couple of weeks, each day, slackening the caps, letting the gas out then tightening them up again ...


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yes it is possible, yes it should be fine. Below is some maths (that I hope helps) - 1 mol of glucose weighs ~180g. You have 1.3 us gal ~ 5 litre (4.9....) of fermentable liquid, I will say 5 is much easier to work with here. At gravity of 1070 you have roughly 1 mol/litre. (182.5g/l) If we assume that during feremtation roughtly 1 mol of glucose yields 2 ...


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So far my brewing is all from kits, I don't use air locks, just 5gal buckets with lids, not sealed all round - so pressure doesn't build up. Then I prime and bottle the flat beer and it gets its fizz from there. As the initial fermentation has co2 sealing the surface of the brew the free space above won't matter, then if you bottle condition it should all ...


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I use an old fridge in the garage. Got an Inkbird controller which has two sockets attached - one for the fridge and another for the heat pad under the fermentation bin. Thermometer probe is in a makeshift pocket inserted through the lid so that it's below the surface of the brew. Now I can control the fermentation temperature to a one degree Centigrade ...


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I know this sounds too easy, but I had half of a batch do this. I was using two different types of bottles (8oz. and 16 oz.). It ends up that the smaller bottles had thin, cheap, rubber gaskets, and there wasn't a good seal. No seal = no pressure buildup = no carbonation. I used almost the exact recipe/process the OP used. I noticed the problem when I ...


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Correct me if I got this wrong, you want to ferment 2Gal (~10 litre) in a 30 Litre pressure vessel? For 1st Ferment, you will probably get away with it as long as the vessel is left undisturbed then the CO2 produced by the yeast is heavier than air and should protect the beverage. the fermentation will probably not produce enough CO2 to bubble any/all air ...


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I would take a gravity reading and taste it! it looks like it fermented well, did it come out of the top? if you had the white cap on it then that is definitely OK. CO2 is heavier than air, so would have protected the beer, and your white cap would have stopped bigger bogies from getting in. but all in the taste, right?


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The yeast will be using the sugar to make alcohol and carbon dioxide. I'm not sure where you read that it will get sweeter, but as far as I know the more sugar you add the more the yeast will consume. The best way to sweeten it is to add a sweetener such as Stevia. You can only use sugar/honey/maple syrup if your yeast has died. Be careful adding sugar ...


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If you use the same amount of yeast in a smaller batch, you would expect a faster fermentation, and perhaps a lower final gravity. When making a strong beer (like a Belgian Triple, etc.) it is common practice to pitch a lot of yeast to ensure good fermentation that fully completes. That said, a final gravity of 1.018 seems very high for a pale ale (on a ...


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No, batch size should not be what is taking the final gravity low. I would question first why you expect an FG of 1.018. That estimate is likely inaccurate but depends most of all on the specifics of the recipe including grist, mash time, and yeast strain. Also, you say you have brewed a pale ale. Assuming this is dry hopped, be aware that hops contain ...


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