5

This looks like Pediococcus contamination: see here Is this lactobacillus? More information about spoilage here: https://www.craftbrewingbusiness.com/news/four-bacteria-that-will-ruin-your-beer/ Lack of sanitation might have cause this.


4

I would set the fermenter into a tub with 2 inches water in the bottom, and drape a wet t-shirt over the fermenter. This will cool it off just by about 5 degrees F, which might keep it under 70 F. To avoid potential fusel alcohols and unusual esters and phenols, you don't want it to get much hotter, so this method is ideal.


4

If you have "spritz", which is carbon dioxide gas, then you have fermentation. No need for concern. Ginger beer often will not have the yeast krausen layer on top, the yeast remains suspended within the beer itself until it is finished and then will settle out. All you need now is patience. Just leave it alone. All is well. Cheers, good luck, ...


4

It's safe to drink. It could potentially have some type of wild bacteria (lacto perhaps), although depending on the brew ingredients this could just be some coagulated oils etc. However, it won't hurt you either way, although introduction of wild yeast could create some off-flavors.


4

We did a "Farmhouse IPA" a year or so ago with Omega's Voss Kveik yeast and fermented it at 90°F. I was pleasantly surprised with how clean it was. It had the expected citrus-y notes, and paired nicely with 3+ lbs. per barrel of dry-hopping, too (Simcoe, Citra, Galaxy). "IPAish enough" is clearly a subjective term. If you're looking for ...


4

Last Australian summer I did a few brews with Lallemand brand Kveik dry yeast at ambient temperatures around 26degC (79degF); actual fermentation got to between 28-29degC (82-84degF) according to my laser thermometer. The results were excellent. Clean tasting beer and no off flavours whatsoever. Kveik is described as a neutral yeast, and my results support ...


4

I used Omega Lutra Kveik on a Bells THA clone last month and it turned out great. There is usually this slippery mouthfeel with the US-05 which wasn't there with the Lutra. I couldn't believe how clean the beer was when transferring. Be prepared for a blow off tube though. Fermentation was done at room temp which varied 72F to 75F. (update) I had a couple ...


3

Cold alone is not really an option, since yeast will not die but become dormant, and could be reactivated after heating a little. There are a few ways to acheive this: Pasteurization This will kill the yeast, but heating could affect the final product in some cases. Filtration A very fine filter can remove yeast particles. Sweeteners/Less sugar Adding ...


3

If it's still fermenting, you're likely just experiencing the hops still in suspension. After fermentation is complete, a LOT of this material and the associated bitterness will drop out of suspension. In other words, it is very normal for a beer, of ANY style, to taste very bitter after just 3 days of fermentation, then to have it all mellow out after the ...


3

The human senses are actually very fine tuned to alert you to the presence of bacteria and mold and prevent botulism (though I think you probably understand this implicitly and just want an authoritative answer). Firstly, look at your brew. Infection will typically manifest as black spots or a layer of pellicle on the top of the drink. Second, smell it -- ...


3

Bakers yeast has been selected to ferment quickly, as the faster it ferments available sugars the faster the dough rises and the sooner you can bake your bread. Whereas, beer and cider yeasts have been selected for flavour profile, and not rate of fermentation. I have in the past brewed with Bakers yeast and if you keep the temps reasonable it can be OK, but ...


2

The generally specified amount is about 1/3 of a cup of yeast slurry into a 20 litre/5 gallon batch - so maybe 25ml, more?. This is all very rough, because you can never be sure of the concentration or viability of the yeast without putting it under a microscope. It's difficult to pitch too much yeast at the home brew level though, so I'd err on the side ...


2

The yeast will be using the sugar to make alcohol and carbon dioxide. I'm not sure where you read that it will get sweeter, but as far as I know the more sugar you add the more the yeast will consume. The best way to sweeten it is to add a sweetener such as Stevia. You can only use sugar/honey/maple syrup if your yeast has died. Be careful adding sugar ...


2

The first problem is that the Mangrove Jack's Empire Ale yeast has an alcohol tolerance of only 8%. Using some beer recipe software, the amount of malt you used would lead to an alcohol percentage of 15%. Which means that your yeast will stop halfway the fermentation. Second, the amount of hops is not matched to the original gravity obtained by using 6kg ...


2

Two months is not too much, if the temperature is not too hot. Best scenario, you could be lucky and still have some water in the airlock. Beer might be fine. Worst scenario, water has evaporated in the airlock. Beer has a great risk of contamination or spoilage. As for the smell, it will depend on temperature as well. If the airlock is dry and the ...


2

The foam you are talking about is normally called "kraüsen" (mostly) or "barm" (sometimes, UK). The sediment at the bottom is excess yeast and trub that has dropped out of your beer. Even if a fermentation is going on for a longer time, this layer will form, so do not worry about that. Looking at the picture, I see that you had a very vigorous fermentation. ...


2

No. You didn't kill your cider, this description sounds like a perfectly normal fermentation. Generally a yeast fermentation is vigorous in the first 1~7 days (typically producing a krausen), this phase is known by the term "primary fermentation". The time taken can be significantly different depending on temperature, sugar-concentration, amount of yeast, ...


2

With some ciders I experience the same burning sensation after a few ciders. I haven't figured out the exact causes yet but I will share a few theories worth testing: 1) Acidity. Some apples are much higher acidity than others. Also some yeasts will produce a higher acid product than others. And as Kingsley also alluded to, carbon dioxide is also acidic ...


2

You ALWAYS want to sanitize your top off water if you are getting it from tap. Bottled water is not necessary but recommended. Additionally, you need to get rid of the chloramines as they will give you off flavors. Adding a campden tablet will aid in that. https://www.morebeer.com/articles/removing_chloramines_from_water. To prevent scorching of the LME, add ...


2

Either way should be fine. Although I'd probably pitch the yeast before moving it just to avoid having to have another thing to do after moving it. 2 hours probably isn't enough for it to start fermenting vigorously enough to even pop a plugged bung out so it won't cause problems as long as it's secured in your car. Just think of it as really good ...


2

There is this homebrew question which already has some good answers. The first thing to look at is your brewing water, and your cleaning and sanitizing solutions. If your brewing water is not highly chlorinated, and you are not using any cleaners solutions that would impart this flavor you may be getting phenolic off flavors as a result of an infection. Your ...


2

Chlorine can only really come from your water or your cleaning process. Make sure you get filtered water or use a campden tablet in your water to get rid of chlorine before you brew. How are you cleaning your equipment? You should only be using chemicals like PBW and Starsan to clean and sanitize everything. Are you absolutely sure it's chlorine? You might ...


2

I would take a gravity reading and taste it! it looks like it fermented well, did it come out of the top? if you had the white cap on it then that is definitely OK. CO2 is heavier than air, so would have protected the beer, and your white cap would have stopped bigger bogies from getting in. but all in the taste, right?


2

In my experience, I usually don't begin to see CO2 bubbles until days 3 or 4. Usually by the end of a week you should have pretty aggressive fermentation. I usually keep my Cider fermenting on a temperature that is the lowest that the yeast supports on the packet as I find that the fermentation is "cleaner" and I believe yeast will produce more &...


2

Is it bad to produce beer like this? ( i don't have money to buy airlock). I wouldn't call it ideal, but it is fine. The only purpose of an airlock is to allow air to escape and not enter. Should I open the bottle every 12 hours to let the gas come out? Yes, I would open it to let it degass to prevent the bottle from exploding during the few days of ...


2

Let the bubbling stop. Then put it in the fridge. Then after a couple of days of clearing put it in the fridge to let the yeast settle out. Once this is done, carefully puur your fermented liquor off the lees(left over yeast), and drink. Do not expect this to be good, it will be liquid and contain alcohol, but it will likely taste awful. I have made ginger ...


2

That stuff is mostly yeast and protein from the active fermentation. Its called krausen. Its nothing to be concerned about. I'd be concerned if it wasn't there post ferment!


2

It really depends on the type of beer. Cold crashing isn't necessary, but works better the longer it goes. For a typical ale, I usually wouldn't bother for more than 3 days mostly 'cause I prefer fresh over crystal-clear. However, for something like a lager, going a month really smooths out the beer. I'm guessing that your cold crash range temps are in ...


1

I see two possibilities: The second recipe has an unrealistic final gravity and most likely isn't finished fermenting. Fruit has very simple sugars, with final gravities typically 0.992 to 0.999 regardless of yeast strain used in most cases, so unless there was a more complex sugar added, or an unfermentable sugar like lactose or maltodextrin, the second ...


1

With only two data points, the only thing you can conclude with any real confidence is that there is simply more dissolved sugar in a beverage with a higher finishing gravity. In the above example (again it's only two data points), it could be suggesting this particular yeast tops-out at around 8.8% AbV, because the second set of readings still retain quite ...


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