5

Control over color is the first thing and the biggest. Even the lightest DME will make beer darker than an all grain made with pilsner to the same gravity. Control over body. All extract, DME included, tends to finish a little higher in gravity points post fermentation than when brewing with all grain. There are ways to help improve the difference in ...


5

You may get some oxidation of the "specialty" wort letting it sit like that. You aren't really saving any time though. Start your steep in cold water while you heat it up. By the time its at 160F you are generally good to pull the grains out and keep on heating to boiling. I know most instructions when I started extract and grain brewing says to steep in ...


4

Yes, you use the wort you create by steeping as part of your boil volume. The method looks fine. I wouldn't worry about steeping efficiency. You won't get more than a few gravity points out of it unless you steep several pounds of grain. Also, be aware that not all grains are suitable for steeping. Some need an actual minimash.


4

Cost - It costs much less per batch (in the long run) to make beer from grain Control - You have much more control over the brewing process. Time - I know you said you know this, but this is the main reason people go extract. The mash time adds over an hour to your brewing day from getting the water up to temperature to mashing to running off the wort. Add ...


3

There's no upper limit in terms of how much speciality malt you can actually use and still extract sugar - the limit is more to do with taste. To my mind, in an extract brew, 20% is the maximum amount of caramel/crystal malt that I would use in a recipe, simply because of the amount of residual sweetness left, which is on top of the sweetness left by the ...


3

Its two different options. You can either do the malt version or the extract version. Wheat Liquid Malt Extract is actually a mix (usually 50/50) of wheat malt and pils/2-row/pale malt, depending on the manufacturer.


3

I've done it maybe 5-6 times and there's no problem. I keep the liquid from the steeping refrigerated overnight and boil it the next day. But as has been said, there may not be much time saving from it. If you think it would help you, there's no problem with it, though.


3

I disagree with Denny's assessment. Compare the theoretical results of not crushing them to grinding them into a powder. The the first case you'll get little flavor/color; in the second you get maximum flavor/color. So the crush does indeed have an important impact. The key is to do it the same way every time for consistency brew to brew. That way an ...


2

With the 'tea' being added to your 60 minute boil, and as long as you follow good sanitation procedures, I don't see any major problems that you would run into. But, you can much more easily just steep your grains in your brew pot while bringing your water up to a boil. This won't add time to your brew day, and will save you time having to deal with ...


2

I don't think it would be a problem, just transfer it to your clean & sanitized fermenting bucket and put the lid and air lock on. the next day transfer back to the boiling pot. the only real down side I could see is it will take longer to bring to a boil.


2

Considering that your problem is consistent, I would say it is the extract. Although you can make good beer form good extract, you can't control the fermentability, so you can't make different styles very well from the same extract. Going to a partial grain recipe might be relatively painless way to fix the problem. The brew-in-a-bag method is easiest to ...


2

As a general suggestion on recipe formulation, this would be a good starting point: http://homebrewmanual.com/home-brewing-calculations/


2

I would not do this. It probably wont "ruin" the flavour, but beer is a (sometimes delicate) balance of the sweetness of the malt against the bitterness of the hops. Your proposal is to add extra sweetness only. I always try to brew the best possible beer. This means not cutting corners for the sake of a relatively small expense. You probably spent a ...


2

I've not brewed with it, but from the Weyermann specs, it's 13L (11.8-13.7L) mild, restrained notes of caramel honey-colored hue use up to 30% in Belgian Blonde, Amber, Tripel, Dubbel Given that it's 500g and it's playing against Vienna, the color is probably less significant than the flavor. To get the restrained caramel, you could probably get away with ...


1

Grain absorbs approx 1 litre per 1 kg, that's the only hard-and-fast rule, everything else depends on recipe and on what you're trying to achieve. Do I understand right that your fermentable base is still going to be liquid/dry extract, and you're gonna steep just specialty malts? If so you can steep maybe 1 kg crystal in ~4 litres of 65C water for ~30 ...


1

Wort juice will sour if left exposed to air below 150F. You can put it in a sanitized, sealed container, but I wouldn't leave it for more than 18 hours. Longer if you refrigerate it. But all of this sounds like more work and more risk than just steeping it when you need it.


1

Ok here's what you want to do. Do the steep as instructed. When you remove the grains just before 170°F, sqeeze the bag the best you can to get as much wort as possible, silicone bbq mits help. Now at 1.75 gallons after grain absorption Then top off to your kettle capacity with water, add DME, mix well and continue with boil without a lid on. Now at 4 ...


1

I am not an expert, but I am also a BIABer and a I work with a small kettle (about 19 liters). So I am always trying to retrieve as much wort as I can with the limitations of my equipment. Something that I recently learn adapting recipes to my equipment, is that yes is possible to make a more concentrate wort that fits size of my/your kettle, and after that ...


1

I believe this would be a protein rest, though the temperature is considerably lower than what I have heard before. John Palmer, in his excellent book, says to use a temp between 113 and 131 degrees. Here is the link http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14-4.html. I have used this method quite a bit and seen a noticeable difference in the beer head ...


1

Did you do a partial boil and add more water afterward? If so, the problem is likely to be inadequate mixing. The wort is heavier than water so when you take a reading you get essentially "watered down" wort. It's nearly impossible to get them mixed thoroughly to get an accurate reading. But if you use all the ingredients and end up with the volume the ...


1

If the volumes are as you both computed and experienced, then there's not very much reason why an extract brew would be so far off the OG number. My guess is that the computer added in the results of "mashing" the crystal grains, crystal does not have any diastatic power. Without any base malt present, no converstion can take place. So your "mash" was really ...


1

That depends on how you define "body." This BYO article offers a pretty solid definition on body: "Body is the sensation of palate fullness, the viscosity and feel of beer in the mouth. It is a characteristic of beer that reflects its ending density and refers to the mouth-filling and thickness properties that a given sample contains." The BYO article ...


1

To answer your first question: "In the base malt or steeped". Saison Dupont uses a mashing method, they do not used steeped grains because all the specialty grains can be added to the mash to achieve the desired flavor as well as fermentable sugars. I will go out on a limb and say that 99.9% of commercial beers do not use the steeping grain method used in ...


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