7

I can understand your confusion - with potential, current, resistance and power all being defined in terms of each other, it's tricky to know where to start! An electric element is a resistive load, with constant resistance. Consequently, the power rating is given relative to the voltage across the element. Since we know the power and the voltage, we can ...


3

I have built a temperature regulation system for fermentation and a mash controller for my electric kettle using Arduino and Raspberry Pi. The Arduino controls the hardware while the Pi handles the web interface, logging, etc. The Pi queries the Arduino over a USB serial connection. There are two reasons for this: The PID software and other stuff I wrote ...


3

For calculating heating element amp draw (as well as other useful things like water heating time), check out the Javascript calculator on my website. Now for your questions three: 1- Algebra Watts = Volts * Amperage is correct, but we need to go back a step to Ohm's law (Volts = Amperage * Resistance) to work this out. We can rearrange Ohm's law to I = V/...


3

If you're boiling 5 gallons or less on the stove top, then brewing indoors can be done using your regular kitchen setup, assuming you've got an extractor fan in the kitchen to vent all the water vapor. For partial boils, it worked well, but for full boils, it took a over an hour to bring the mash liquor up to temperature, and even longer to bring the full 5 ...


2

I use a 5500W reliance element for boiling 56L wort (ca. 15 gallons) on about 80% duty which gives a vigorous boil. This is the typical pre-boil volume for hitting 10 gallons packaged beer. The element uses a 1" NPS thread (although check carefully - there are also elements with 1-3/8" thread.) You can get 1" NPS locknuts at bargainfittings.com. There's a ...


2

It's got to be the element going open at that temperature - 5500W is plenty of power (9 minutes!). I guess this a water heater element, designed to operate at 120F or so, it might even be a 'safety feature'. An inductive ammeter would answer that question very quickly.


2

The problem might be a thermocouple this is a hardwired switch that will cut the element out if the temp goes to high. this is a additional safety and is normally wired in series with the thermostat that normally switches of the element when it gets to the set temperature. this switch might be faulty, your local electrician might be able to fix it or maybe ...


2

you may want to ask this on the electronics stack exchange. but to answer this here. no, you cant replace a PT100 sensor, with a 1-wire temp sensor. PT100/1000 are analog sensors, 1 wire sensors are digital. as to convert a 1 wire, to an analog sensor, all depends on your knowledge of electronics, easy if you know a lot, hard if you dont know anything....


2

I would think a low wattage element would work. Low wattage to insure against scorching wort as it travels buy the element under the false bottom. Essentially what you are describing is the same thing as a direct fired kettle mash tun. That's how I mash. I am using a propane burner under the mash tun equipped with a false bottom and a pump. The trick is ...


2

Check your agitator motor connection. How many wires does it have? Where are these wires connected? Sounds like you've wired your agitator motor in such a way that when you turn on your heating element, your agitator motor takes the voltage from the heating element as well. So when you adjust your voltage on the agitator motor, it doesn't do anything ...


1

I have a Robobrew and while it will run on 110V, it appears to be less than satisfactory (regardless of what their marketing tells you). One thing that will help is buying the thermal jacket for it (it has an official thermal jacket) which will help to retain heat. Also as others have said, if your house has 2x110v phases from the main distribution get your ...


1

Sorry, the two are very different - to make a OneWire sensor look like a PT100 sensor, you'd have to find some way to recreate the resistance in the wire that varies with temperature, which is how a PT100 works. The simplest way to do that would be to use a real PT100 sensor - emulating a PT100 sensor would be much harder and most likely introduce more error ...


1

Does the Kettle have a thermal cut out switch wired in the circuit with the element? If this is the case the thermal cut out switch switches the element off each time it gets to a specific temp. this is a safety feature and can be bypassed by if you have some electrical knowledge.


1

I think you would have to make that adapter yourself. Water heater threads are usually NPS or standard threads where your SS fittings are NPT Pipe threads. Your best bet is to weld the correct bung or adapter into the keg side. I have seen 120V 1400+W immersion heaters that use o-ring style seals but will not heat as well as 220v elements. Another choice ...


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